Yahoo Web Search

  1. Bosniaks - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Bosniaks

    The Bosniaks were recognized as an ethnic group in 1961 but not as a nationality and in 1964 the Fourth Congress of the Bosnian Party assured the Bosniaks the right to self-determination. On that occasion, one of the leading communist leaders, Rodoljub Čolaković , stated that "our Muslim brothers" were equal with Serbs and Croats and that ...

  2. History of the Bosniaks - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › History_of_the_Bosniaks

    Bosniaks are a South Slavic ethnic group, native to Bosnia and Herzegovina and the region of Sandžak. The term Bosniaks was re-instated in 1993 after decades of suppression in the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia. The Bosniak Assembly adopted the ethnonym to replace "Bosnian Muslims."

  3. People also ask

    Is Bosnia Muslim or Catholic?

    Are Bosnian Muslims considered Slavic?

    What is the Bosniak scale?

    What is Bosniak 2F type of kidney cysts?

  4. Bosniaks - Simple English Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    simple.wikipedia.org › wiki › Bosniaks

    The Bosniaks (Bošnjaci/Бошњаци, feminine: Bošnjakinja/Бошњакиња) are South Slavic nation and ethnic group. They come from Old Bosnia, which is today Bosnia and Herzegovina, though many of them are from the other Balkan populations, especially Serbia, Montenegro and Croatia.

  5. Bosniaks - Wikipedia

    sco.wikipedia.org › wiki › Bosniaks

    Bosniaks are teepically characterisit bi thair historic tee tae the Bosnie historical region, tradeetional adherence tae Islam syne the 15t an 16t centuries, common cultur an leid. In the Inglis-speakin warld, Bosniaks are referred tae as Bosnie Muslims or simply Bosnies an aw.

  6. List of Bosniaks - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › List_of_Bosniaks

    Mak Dizdar, his works Stone Sleeper and The Blue River are important poetic achievements; Hamid Dizdar, writer and poet but also older brother of Mak Dizdar; Safvet-beg Bašagić, considered the father of Bosnian renaissance

  7. Bosniaks of Serbia - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Bosniaks_of_Serbia
    • Overview
    • Demographics
    • History
    • Politics
    • Religion

    North America United States of America Canada South America Argentina Bolivia Brazil Chile Colombia Peru Oceania Australia New Zealand Culture Kinship Architecture Cultural Heritage Sites Literature Music Art Cinema Cuisine Sport History History of Bosnia and Herzegovina Bosnian rulers Language Bosnian Shtokavian Serbo-Croatian Related nations Ethnic Muslims Montenegrins Ethnic Yugoslavs Croats Serbs Slovenes v t e Bosniaks are the fourth largest ethnic group in Serbia after Serbs, Hungarians an

    Bosniaks, as ethnic minority, are primarily the ones living in south-western Serbia, in the region historically known as Sandžak, which is today divided between the states of Serbia and Montenegro. Colloquially referred to as Sandžaklije by themselves and others, Bosniaks form the majority in three out of six municipalities in the Serbian part of Sandžak: Novi Pazar, Tutin and Sjenica and comprise an overall majority of 59.6%. The town of Novi Pazar is a cultural center of the Bosniaks ...

    Two thirds of Sandžak Bosniaks trace their ancestry to the regions of Montenegro. which they started departing first in 1687, after Turkey lost Boka Kotorska. The trend continued in Old Montenegro after 1711 with the extermination of alleged converts to Islam. Another contributing factor that spurred migration to Sandžak from the Old Montenegro was the fact that the old Orthodox population of Sandžak moved towards Serbia and Habsburg Monarchy in two waves, first after 1687, and then ...

    The first major political organising of the Sandžak Muslims happened at the Sjenica conference, held in August 1917, during the Austrian-Hungarian occupation of the Sanjak of Novi Pazar. The Muslim representatives at the conference decided to ask the Austrian-Hungarian authorities to separate the Sanjak of Novi Pazar from Serbia and Montenegro and merge it with Bosnia and Herzegovina, or at least to give an autonomy to the region. After the end of the World War I and the creation of the Kingdom

    According to the 2011 Census, almost all Bosniaks in Serbia are Muslim. The remainder is not religious or did not declare their religion. The Bosniaks make up the basis or 65% of the Muslim community in Serbia, with most other Muslims being ethnic Albanians or a part of the Romani community.

  8. Bosniaks in Kosovo - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Bosniaks_in_Kosovo
    • Overview
    • Demographics
    • Bosniaks in Prizren
    • Politics

    North America United States of America Canada South America Argentina Bolivia Brazil Chile Colombia Peru Oceania Australia New Zealand Culture Kinship Architecture Cultural Heritage Sites Literature Music Art Cinema Cuisine Sport History History of Bosnia and Herzegovina Bosnian rulers Language Bosnian Shtokavian Serbo-Croatian Related nations Ethnic Muslims Montenegrins Ethnic Yugoslavs Croats Serbs Slovenes v t e Bosniaks are an ethnic minority group in Kosovo, numbering 27,553 according to th

    The 2011 census states the number of Bosniaks in Kosovo are 27,553, with around 21,000 of them living in the municipalities of Prizren and Dragaš. Bosniaks make up 1.6% of the whole population.

    From Tuzla they arrived first in 1935, continuing until 1945. The reason for their arrival was to be able to immigrate to Turkey under the Yugoslavian-Turkish migration law, like other Bosniaks in Socialist Republic of Macedonia. Today they are present in 18 villages: Nebregošte, Manastirica, Ljubinje Gornjo, Ljubinje Donjo, Rečane, Lokvica, Sredska, Bogošovce, Mušnikovo, Planjane, Gornje Selo, Rlačiki, Pejciki, Drajčiči, Milačiki, Zivinjanje.

    There are several Bosniak political parties in Kosovo and the oldest one is Bosniak Party of Democratic Action of Kosovo. Bosniaks feel generally safe in Kosovo, but there are a few that experience violence targeted towards them. There have been no Bosniak returns to Kosovo. Instead, more Bosniaks are selling their homes to leave for Bosnia and Herzegovina and Western Europe.

  9. Bosniaks of Slovenia - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Bosniaks_of_Slovenia
    • Overview
    • Geography
    • History
    • Religion

    Bosniaks are an ethnic group living in Slovenia. According to the last census from 2002, the total number of Bosniaks in Slovenia was 32,009 as they comprised 1.6% of the total population of Slovenia. According to the last census, they are the third largest minority ethnic group in Slovenia, after Serbs and Croats.

    Bosniaks in Slovenia primarily live in the capital city of Slovenia; Ljubljana. There are dispersed populations of Bosniaks living in various cities and towns in Slovenia, though most choose to live in Ljubljana. Many Bosniaks have left Slovenia for other Western countries and Bosnia. Bosniaks make up a tiny percentage of Slovenia's population, however today, many Bosniaks have retained their identity and culture.

    During the First World War, a Bosniak regiment made up primarily of Bosnian Muslims were sent to fight on the Italian front. One of the soldiers who fought there was a boy called Elez Dervišević, the youngest soldier to fight in the Soca battle in World War I. Elez was 11 years old when he served in the Austro-Hungarian Army. In Log pod Mangartom there is a statue of Elez's father dedicated to him. Many Bosniaks have emigrated to Slovenia from their native Bosnia since the 1960s ...

    Today, the majority of Bosniaks are predominantly Sunni Muslim and adhere to the Hanafi school of thought, or law, the largest and oldest school of Islamic law in jurisprudence within Sunni Islam.

  10. Bosniaks in Turkey - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Bosniaks_in_Turkey

    Bosniaks mostly live in the Marmara Region which is in other words the north-west Turkey. The biggest Bosniak community in Turkey is in Istanbul . Yenibosna ("New Bosnia") is a borough, located on the western part of the Istanbul district of Bahçelievler, bordering with the neighbor district Küçükçekmece.

  11. People also search for
  1. Ad
    related to: Bosniaks wikipedia