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  1. Society in the Joseon Dynasty From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Korean people in a painting from the 18th century Society in the Joseon Dynasty was built upon Neo-Confucianist ideals, namely the three fundamental principles and five moral disciplines.

    Society in the Joseon Dynasty - Wikipedia

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Society_in_the_Joseon_Dynasty
  2. en.wikipedia.org › wiki › JoseonJoseon - Wikipedia

    When the new dynasty was brought into existence, Taejo brought up the issue of which son would be his successor. Although Yi Bangwon, Taejo's fifth son by Queen Sineui, had contributed most to assisting his father's rise to power, the prime minister Jeong Do-jeon and Nam Eun used their influence on King Taejo to name his eighth son (second son of Queen Sindeok) Grand Prince Uian (Yi Bang-seok ...

    • Easterners

      The Easterners (Korean: 동인; Hanja: 東人; RR: Dongin; lit. East...

    • Jeong Cheol

      Jeong Cheol (Hangul: 정철, Hanja: 鄭澈; 18 December 1536 – 7...

  3. This article explains the history of the Joseon dynasty, which ruled Korea from 1392 to 1897. The history of Joseon is largely divided into two parts: the early period and the late period; some divide it into three parts, including a middle period. The standard for dividing the early period and the late period is the Imjinwaeran period (Japanese invasions of Korea) (1592 ~ 1598).

    • Overview
    • Government
    • Local government
    • Factions
    • Rebellions
    • Diplomacy

    The politics of the Joseon dynasty, which ruled Korea from 1392 to 1897, were governed by the reigning ideology of Korean Confucianism, a form of Neo-Confucianism. Political struggles were common between different factions of the scholar-officials. Purges frequently resulted in leading political figures being sent into exile or condemned to death. ...

    The king ruled for life, unlike any of his appointees. The kings of Joseon were all of the Jeonju Yi clan and descended from Taejo. For a list of Joseon kings, see List of Korean monarchs. Under Confucian philosophy, the king commanded absolute loyalty from his officials and subj

    In order to serve in the positions of responsibility outside the military in Joseon dynasty, one had to take a series of gwageo literary examinations and pass each of them. Theoretically, any male other than cheonmin and children of concubines could take gwageo examinations to en

    State Council was the highest deliberative body of the Joseon dynasty although it faded in importance after first centuries of rule. It was composed of twelve officials. The Chief State Councillor, Left State Councillor, and Right State Councillor were the highest-ranking officia

    The ranked officials were sent from the central government. Sometimes a secret royal inspector was sent to travel incognito and monitor the provincial officials. Secret inspectors were generally young officials of lower rank but invested with royal authority to dismiss corrupt officials. 1. Provinces: – There were eight provinces, each of them gove...

    Throughout the dynasty, various regional and ideological factions struggled for dominance in the political system. In the earliest years of Joseon, tension between the capital faction and the Yeongnam-based Sarim faction dominated national politics. The different Seowon across the country, which combined the functions of Confucian shrines with educ...

    The most famous rebellions took place in the 19th century, as the social system of Joseon was beginning to collapse: the rebellion of Hong Gyeong-nae in the northern provinces in 1811, the Imo Incident of 1882, and the Donghak uprising of 1894–1895. Occasional rebellions also took place among the country's small ethnic minorities. The Tungusic trib...

    Joseon's international relations implemented Korean Neo-Confucian ideal of "serving the great" to Chinese Ming dynasty and later Manchu Qing dynasty. On a lower level, the country maintained ties with various neighboring nations, including the Jurchen tribes of the north and the Japanese and Ryūkyū states across the sea. To this end, interpreting s...

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    • Overview
    • Guiding principles
    • Structure
    • Clans, family and marriage
    • Women

    Society in the Joseon Dynasty was built upon Neo-Confucianist ideals, namely the three fundamental principles and five moral disciplines. There were four classes: the yangban nobility, the "middle class" jungin, sangmin, or the commoners, and the cheonmin, the outcasts at the very bottom. Society was ruled by the yangban, who constituted 10% of the...

    Korean society has always been hierarchical and the conscious, government-backed spreading of Neo-Confucianism reinforced this idea. Even though the philosophy originates in China, Korea also adopted and integrated it into daily life, transforming it to fit the nation's needs and developed it in a way that became specific to Korea. Korean society i...

    The basis of Joseon society was a system similar to caste systems. Historian Baek Ji-won considers the Korean system comparable to that of India. According to Michael Seth, the Korean system could, in principle, be compared to India's. In practice, however, classes may not have been as impenetrable and clearly separated as in India. Bruce Cumings, ...

    Korea has a clan system, where every Korean belongs to a bongwan that can trace ancestry back to the founding father of the clan. Different clans may share certain surnames, differentiated by the founding city or town of the clan. Clan structure had existed well before the founding of Joseon but the spread of Confucianism made its rules stricter, d...

    During the Goryeo Dynasty women had considerable freedom. They could freely mingle with men, have their own possessions, and inherit land. That changed drastically during the second half of the Joseon era after the Imjin War, women's situation became gradually worse. Their life was regulated by Neo-Confucianism but in a much stricter way than in Ch...

  5. Joseon (Hangul: 조선; Hanja: 朝鮮; also Chosŏn, Choson, Chosun, Cho-sen), was a Korean state started by Taejo Yi Seong-gye. It began after the end of the Goryeo Dynasty at what is today the city of Kaesong. It ended with the assassination of Empress Myeongseong. Joseon was the last dynasty of Korean history and the longest Confucian dynasty.

  6. The Veritable Records of the Joseon Dynasty are the annual records of the Joseon Dynasty of Korea, which were kept from 1392 to 1865. The annals, or sillok, comprise 1,893 volumes and are thought to cover the longest continual period of a single dynasty in the world. With the exception of two sillok compiled during the colonial era, the Annals are the 151st national treasure of Korea and listed in UNESCO's Memory of the World registry. The Annals has since 2006 been digitized by the National Ins

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