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      • Waddar ( Dravidian)
      • Waigali or Kalasha-Ala ( Indo-Aryan)
      • Waima or Roro ( Malayo-Polynesian)
      • Wakhi ( Iranian)
      • Walloon ( Romance)
      • Waray-Waray or Binisaya ( Malayo-Polynesian)
      • Washo ( Hokan)
      • Welsh ( Celtic)
      • Western Neo-Aramaic ( Semitic)
      • Wolane (Silt'e) ( Semitic)
      simple.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_languages#:~:text=W%201%20Waddar%20%28%20Dravidian%29%202%20Waigali%20or,10%20Wolane%20%28Silt%27e%29%20%28%20Semitic%29%20More%20items...%20
  1. People also ask

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  2. Malayo-Polynesian languages - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Malayo-Polynesian_languages

    The Malayo-Polynesian languages are a subgroup of the Austronesian languages, with approximately 385.5 million speakers.The Malayo-Polynesian languages are spoken by the Austronesian peoples of the island nations of Southeast Asia and the Pacific Ocean, with a smaller number in continental Asia, going well into the Malay peninsula.

  3. Central–Eastern Malayo-Polynesian languages - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Central–Eastern_Malayo...

    Distribution. The Central Malayo-Polynesian languages are spoken in the Lesser Sunda and Maluku Islands of the Banda Sea, in an area corresponding closely to the Indonesian provinces of East Nusa Tenggara and Maluku and the nation of East Timor (excepting the Papuan languages of Timor and nearby islands), but with the Bima language extending to the eastern half of Sumbawa Island in the ...

  4. Malayo-Polynesian languages - Simple English Wikipedia, the ...

    simple.wikipedia.org/.../Malayo-Polynesian_languages

    The Malayo-Polynesian languages are a subgroup of the Austronesian languages. There are about 385.5 million people who speak these languages.The Malayo-Polynesian languages are spoken by the Austronesian people of the island nations of Southeast Asia and the Pacific Ocean.

  5. Western Malayo-Polynesian languages - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Western_Malayo-Polynesian...

    The Western Malayo-Polynesian (WMP) languages, also known as the Hesperonesian languages, are a paraphyletic grouping of Austronesian languages that includes those Malayo-Polynesian languages that do not belong to the Central–Eastern Malayo-Polynesian (CEMP) branch.

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  6. Proto-Malayo-Polynesian language - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Proto-Malayo-Polynesian
    • Overview
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    Proto-Malayo-Polynesian is the reconstructed ancestor of the Malayo-Polynesian languages, which is by far the largest branch of the Austronesian language family. Proto-Malayo-Polynesian is ancestral to all Austronesian languages spoken outside Taiwan, as well as the Yami language on Taiwan's Orchid Island. The first systematic reconstruction of Proto-Austronesian by Otto Dempwolff was based on evidence from languages outside of Taiwan, and was therefore actually the first reconstruction of what

    The Proto-Austronesian vowels *a, *i, *u, *e and final diphthongs *ay, *aw, *uy, *iw remained unchanged.

    In a recent study, Roger Blench has raised doubts that there was actually a single unitary Proto-Malayo-Polynesian language. Rather, Malayo-Polynesian expansion across the Luzon Strait consisted of multi-ethnic crews rapidly settling across various locations in maritime Southeast Asia, as suggested by both archaeological and linguistic evidence. There was also a Malayo-Polynesian migration to Hainan; Blench notes that both Hlai and Austronesian peoples use the foot-braced backstrap loom as well.

    Below are selected animal and plant names in Proto-Malayo-Polynesian from the Austronesian Comparative Dictionary.

  7. Category:Malayo-Polynesian languages - Wikimedia Commons

    commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Category:Malayo...

    Wikipedia: Instance of: language family: Subclass of: Austronesian languages: ... Greater North Borneo languages, Batanic languages) Nuclear Malayo-Polynesian ...

  8. Malayo-Polynesian languages | Article about Malayo-Polynesian ...

    encyclopedia2.thefreedictionary.com/Malayo...

    Malayo-Polynesian languages (məlā`ō-pŏlĭnē`zhən), sometimes also called Austronesian languages (ô'strōnē`zhən), family of languages estimated at from 300 to 500 tongues and understood by approximately 300 million people in Madagascar; the Malay Peninsula; Indonesia and New Guinea; the Philippines; Taiwan; the Melanesian, Micronesian, and Polynesian islands; and New Zealand.

  9. Malayo-Polynesian languages | Infoplease

    www.infoplease.com/encyclopedia/arts/language/...

    Malayo-Polynesian languages məlā´ō-pŏlĭnē´zhən [], sometimes also called Austronesian languages ô˝strōnē´zhən [], family of languages estimated at from 300 to 500 tongues and understood by approximately 300 million people in Madagascar; the Malay Peninsula; Indonesia and New Guinea; the Philippines; Taiwan; the Melanesian, Micronesian, and Polynesian islands; and New Zealand.

  10. Formosan languages - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Formosan_languages

    Families of Formosan languages before Chinese colonization, per Blust (1999).Malayo-Polynesian (red) may lie within Eastern Formosan (purple). Note that the white section in the northwest of the country does not indicate a complete absence of aboriginal people from that part of Taiwan.

  11. Austronesian languages - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Austronesian_languages

    The first was Malayo-Polynesian, distributed across the Philippines, Indonesia, and Melanesia. The second migration was that of the Oceanic languages into Polynesia and Micronesia. Primary branches on Taiwan (Formosan languages) In addition to Malayo-Polynesian, thirteen Formosan subgroups are broadly accepted.