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  1. Nepalese rupee - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Nepalese_rupee

    The Nepalese rupee ( Nepali: रुपैयाँ; symbol: रु, ₨; code: NPR) is the official currency of the Federal Democratic Republic of Nepal. The Nepalese rupee is subdivided into 100 paisa. The issuance of the currency is controlled by the Nepal Rastra Bank, the central bank of Nepal. The Nepalese rupee was introduced in 1932 when ...

    • History

      The rupee was introduced in 1932, replacing the silver mohar...

    • Exchange rates

      Between 1857 and 1930, the Nepalese rupee was fixed at 1.28...

  2. Nepalese rupee — Wikipedia Republished // WIKI 2

    wiki2.org › en › Nepalese_rupee

    Jun 20, 2019 · The Nepalese Rupee (Nepali: रूपैयाँ, symbol: रू, Rs.; code: NPR) is the official currency of the Federal Democratic Republic of Nepal. The Nepalese rupee is subdivided into 100 paisa. The issuance of the currency is controlled by the Nepal Rastra Bank, the central bank of Nepal. The Nepalese rupee was introduced in 1932, when it replaced the Nepalese mohar at the rate 2:1.

  3. Nepalese rupee - Wiki

    en.wikiredia.com › wiki › Nepalese_rupee
    • 1945–1955
    • 1972–2001
    • 2007–2012

    Rupees in Nepal and Pakistan were worth the same amount. Early banknotes which were issued between 1945 and 1955 during the rule of King Tribhuvanwere put into circulation by the Sadar Muluki Khana (The Treasury) as Nepal did not have a Central Bank at that time. Notes issued under the reign of King Tribhuvan were therefore not signed by a bank governor, but by a Kajanchi (Head of the Treasury) who also serves as a Hindu high-priest. As such, Nepal’s early paper currency probably include the only bank-notes in the world which were signed by a high-priest. These early notes were printed by the Indian Security Press in Nashik and do not have any security features, except for watermarks and the special paper on which they are printed.

    During King Birendra’s rule, one can also distinguish between two major series of banknotes. The first series features the king wearing the military uniform while on the notes of the second series the king is wearing the traditional Nepalese crown adorned with feathers of the bird of paradise. During this period regular banknotes of 2 and 20 rupees and special banknotes of 25 and 250 rupees were issued for the first time. The legends found on the last issues of Gyanendra revert to Nepal sarkar("Nepalese government"), thus omitting the reference to the king.

    In October 2007, a 500-rupee note was issued on which the king’s portrait was replaced by Mt. Everest. This reflects the historic change from a kingdom to a republic which took place in May 2008 in Nepal. Further notes of 5, 10, 20, 50, 100 and 1000 rupees with Mt. Everest and without reference to the king in their legends followed in 2008. The first issues of the 500- and 1000-rupee notes were printed on paper which still had the king's crowned portrait as a watermark in the "window" on the right part of the face of the notes. It was decided to print a red Rhododendron flower (Nepal's national flower) on top of the watermark. Notes of these denominations which were issued in 2009 and thereafter are printed on paper which has a Rhododendron flower as watermark instead of the royal portrait and were therefore released without the additional overprint in red.

  4. Talk:Nepalese rupee - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Talk:Nepalese_rupee

    File:Nepal One Rupee obverse.jpg Nominated for speedy Deletion An image used in this article, File:Nepal One Rupee obverse.jpg , has been nominated for speedy deletion for the following reason: Wikipedia files with no non-free use rationale as of 18 November 2011

  5. Wikipedia:Featured picture candidates/Nepalese Rupee

    en.wikipedia.org › Nepalese_Rupee

    Nepalese Rupee coin. Voting period is over. Please don't add any new votes. Voting period ends on 29 Jul 2010 at 08:16:53 (UTC) Articles in which this image appears Nepalese rupee, Economy of Nepal, Rupee Creator Benjamint 08:16, 20 July 2010 (UTC) Support as nominator--Benjamint 08:16, 20 July 2010 (UTC)

  6. Rupee - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Rupee

    Rupee is the common name for the currencies of India, Indonesia, the Maldives, Mauritius, Nepal, Pakistan, Seychelles, and Sri Lanka, and of former currencies of Afghanistan, Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, and the UAE (as the Gulf rupee), British East Africa, Burma, German East Africa, and Tibet.

  7. Nepalese rupee wiki | TheReaderWiki

    thereaderwiki.com › en › Nepalese_rupee

    The Nepalese rupee (रु) is pegged to the Indian rupee (₹) at the rate रु1.60 = ₹1 since 1994; prior to this, it had been pegged at the rate रु1.45 = ₹1. History. The rupee was introduced in 1932, replacing the silver mohar at a rate of 2 mohar = 1 rupee. At first, the rupee was called the Mohru in Nepali. 1945–1955. Rupees ...

  8. Wikizero - Nepalese rupee

    www.wikizero.com › en › Nepalese_rupee
    • History
    • Banknotes
    • Exchange Rates
    • See Also
    • References
    • External Links

    The rupee was introduced in 1932, replacing the silver mohar at a rate of 2 mohar = 1 rupee. At first, the rupee was called the Mohru in Nepali.

    On 17 September 1945, the government introduced notes for 5, 10 and 100 rupees, with the name mohru used in Nepalese. There are also 25- and 250-rupee notes commemorating the Silver Jubilee of Birendra Bir Bikram Shah in 1997.[citation needed] Since 2007, Nepalese rupee banknotes have been produced by Perum Peruri, the mint company of Indonesia. In 2012, Nepal Rastra Bank issued a revised banknote series that is similar to the 2007 series, but now include inscriptions in English and the year of issue on the back.

    Between 1857 and 1930, the Nepalese rupee (two half-rupees or mohars) was fixed at 1.28 per Indian rupee. After this period, its value fluctuated against the Indian rupee, falling to रु1.60 = ₹1 in 1939, rising to रु0.60 = ₹1 during the Second World Warand falling again afterwards. In 1952, the government of Nepal officially pegged the Nepalese rupee at रु1.28 = ₹1, although the market rate remained at रु1.60 = ₹1. Between 1955 and 1957, there was a series of soft peg revaluations that started at रु1.755 = ₹1 and appreciated to रु1.305 = ₹1 by 1957. In 1958, the government applied a new exchange rate of रु1.505 = ₹1 for the purchase of plane tickets only. A hard peg of रु1.60 = ₹1 was instituted in 1960, which was revalued to रु1.0155 = ₹1 when the Indian rupee was sharply devalued on 6 June 1966.The Indian rupee ceased to be legal tender in Nepal in 1966. From 1967 to 1975, the government pegged the Nepalese rupee against the Indian rupee, the US dollar and gold, starting at रु1.35...

    Agrawal (Giriya), Shyam and Gyawali, Kamal Prasad: Notes and Coins of Nepal. Nepal Rastra Bank Golden Jubilee Year 2005/06, Kathmandu, 2006.
    Bertsch, Wolfgang: "The Legends on the Banknotes of Nepal", International Banknote Society (IBNS) Journal, vol. 48, no. 3, 2009, p. 39–44.
    Jha, Hari Jaya: An Overview of Nepalese Paper Money. Manjeeta Jha, Lalitpur (Patan), B.S. 2058 (= A.D. 2001).
    Lorenzoli, Giovanni: “Nepali artistic buildings as seen on Nepali notes”. Journal of the International Banknote Society, vol. 43, no. 3 (2004), p. 6–14.

    Heiko Otto (ed.). "Historical and current banknotes of Nepal" (in English and German). Retrieved 2017-05-29.

  9. Nepal - Wikipedia

    bcl.wikipedia.org › wiki › Nepal

    An Nepal sarong nasyon sa Asya. Mananagbuan ini sa Timog Asya, sa tahaw kan Tsina asin India. Inaapod man na Demokratikong Republikang Pederal nin Nepal. Pigtatantiya na nasa 26.4 milyong katawo an populasyon kan Nepal. Ini an ika-48 na matawong nasyon sa kinaban dangan ika 93 sa pinakamahiwas na teritoryo sa kadagaan.

    • Nepalese Rupee (NPR)
    • Kathmandu
    • Federal Parliamentary Republic
    • NP
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