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  1. The Nepalese rupee (रु) has been pegged to the Indian rupee (₹) at the rate रु1.60 = ₹1 since 1994; prior to this, it had been pegged at the rate रु1.45 = ₹1. [2] Contents 1 History 1.1 The "Bullet paisa" 1.2 1972–2001 1.3 2007–2012 2 Banknotes 3 Exchange rates 4 See also 5 References 6 Sources 7 Further reading History [ edit]

    • Nepalese Banknotes

      2007/2008. In October 2007, a 500 rupee note was issued on...

    • History

      The rupee was introduced in 1932, replacing the silver mohar...

    • Exchange rates

      Between 1857 and 1930, the Nepalese rupee was fixed at 1.28...

    • History
    • Banknotes
    • Exchange Rates
    • See Also

    The rupee was introduced in 1932, replacing the silver mohar at a rate of 2 mohar = 1 rupee. At first, the rupee was called the Mohru in Nepali.

    On 17 September 1945, the government introduced banknotes for 5, 10 and 100 rupees, with the name mohru used in Nepalese. There are also 250-rupee notes commemorating the Silver Jubilee of Birendra Bir Bikram Shah in 1997.[citation needed] Since 2007, Nepalese rupee banknotes have been produced by Perum Peruri, the mint company of Indonesia. In 201...

    Between 1857 and 1930, the Nepalese rupee (two half-rupees or mohars) was fixed at 1.28 per Indian rupee. After this period, its value fluctuated against the Indian rupee, falling to रु1.60 = ₹1 in 1939, rising to रु0.60 = ₹1 during the Second World Warand falling again afterwards. In 1952, the government of Nepal officially pegged the Nepalese rup...

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  3. This page was last edited on 10 July 2019, at 11:20 (UTC).; Text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply.By ...

    • History
    • Banknotes
    • Exchange Rates
    • See Also
    • References
    • External Links

    The rupee was introduced in 1932, replacing the silver mohar at a rate of 2 mohar = 1 rupee. At first, the rupee was called the Mohru in Nepali.

    On 17 September 1945, the government introduced notes for 5, 10 and 100 rupees, with the name mohru used in Nepalese. There are also 250-rupee notes commemorating the Silver Jubilee of Birendra Bir Bikram Shah in 1997.[citation needed] Since 2007, Nepalese rupee banknotes have been produced by Perum Peruri, the mint company of Indonesia. In 2012, N...

    Between 1857 and 1930, the Nepalese rupee (two half-rupees or mohars) was fixed at 1.28 per Indian rupee. After this period, its value fluctuated against the Indian rupee, falling to रु1.60 = ₹1 in 1939, rising to रु0.60 = ₹1 during the Second World Warand falling again afterwards. In 1952, the government of Nepal officially pegged the Nepalese rup...

    Agrawal (Giriya), Shyam and Gyawali, Kamal Prasad: Notes and Coins of Nepal. Nepal Rastra Bank Golden Jubilee Year 2005–06, Kathmandu, 2006.
    Bertsch, Wolfgang: "The Legends on the Banknotes of Nepal", International Banknote Society (IBNS) Journal, vol. 48, no. 3, 2009, p. 39–44.
    Jha, Hari Jaya: An Overview of Nepalese Paper Money. Manjeeta Jha, Lalitpur (Patan), B.S. 2058 (= A.D. 2001).
    Lorenzoli, Giovanni: “Nepali artistic buildings as seen on Nepali notes”. Journal of the International Banknote Society, vol. 43, no. 3 (2004), p. 6–14.
    Heiko Otto (ed.). "Historical and current banknotes of Nepal" (in English and German). Retrieved 2017-05-29.
  4. The Nepalese rupee (रु) has been pegged to the Indian rupee (₹) at the rate रु1.60 = ₹1 since 1994; prior to this, it had been pegged at the rate रु1.45 = ₹1. [2] History The rupee was introduced in 1932, replacing the silver mohar at a rate of 2 mohar = 1 rupee. At first, the rupee was called the Mohru in Nepali. [3] The "Bullet paisa"

  5. en.wikipedia.org › wiki › RupeeRupee - Wikipedia

    The Indian rupees ( ₹) and Pakistani rupees ( ₨) are subdivided into one hundred paise (singular paisa) or pice. The Nepalese rupee subdivides into one hundred paisa (singular and plural) or four sukaas. The Mauritian, Seychellois, and Sri Lankan rupees subdivide into 100 cents. Contents 1 Etymology 2 History

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