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  1. Seward Highway - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seward_Highway

    The Seward Highway is a highway in the U.S. state of Alaska that extends 125 miles (201 km) from Seward to Anchorage. It was completed in 1951 and runs through the scenic Kenai Peninsula, Chugach National Forest, Turnagain Arm, and Kenai Mountains.

    • 1923–present
    • East 5th Avenue in Anchorage
    • 125.336 mi (201.709 km)
    • Railway Avenue in Seward
  2. Talk:Seward Highway - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Talk:Seward_Highway

    The Seward Highway crosses the KPB/MOA boundary somewhere in between the Placer River/Twentymile Creek crossings and the ascent into the Kenai Mountains. RadioKAOS (talk) 13:19, 13 March 2012 (UTC) (Oh yeah, one more thing)...In recent years, the Rand McNally atlas has published mini-features on Scenic Byways and other scenic drives.

  3. Seward Highway to Glenn Highway Connection - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seward_Highway_to_Glenn...

    The Seward Highway to Glenn Highway Connection is currently in the scoping stage of project development. During the scoping process, the project team will collect input from the various individuals, community groups, and government agencies that will be incorporated into an Environmental Impact Statement.

  4. People also ask

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  5. Seward, Alaska - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seward,_Alaska
    • Overview
    • History
    • Geography
    • Economy
    • Government and infrastructure

    Seward is an incorporated home rule city in Alaska, United States. Located on Resurrection Bay, a fjord of the Gulf of Alaska on the Kenai Peninsula, Seward is situated on Alaska's southern coast, approximately 120 miles by road from Alaska's largest city, Anchorage. With a population of 2,693 people as of the 2010 Census, Seward is the fourth-largest city in the Kenai Peninsula Borough, behind Kenai, Homer, and the borough seat of Soldotna. The city is named for former U.S. Secretary of State W

    In 1793, Alexander Baranov of the Shelikhov-Golikov company established a fur trade post on Resurrection Bay where Seward is today and had a three-masted vessel, the Phoenix, built at the post by James Shields, an English shipwright in Russian service. The 1939 Slattery Report on Alaskan development identified the region as one of the areas where new settlements would be established through Jewish immigration. This plan was never implemented. Seward was an important port for the military buildup

    According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 21.5 square miles, of which 14.4 square miles is land and 7.1 square miles is water. The northern city limits are demarcated by the lower reaches of the Resurrection River, but extend east past the river's mouth at the northern end of Resurrection Bay to include parts of the bay's extreme northeastern shore, including the beach at the mouth of Fourth of July Creek and the grounds of Spring Creek Correctional Center just i

    Seward's local economy is largely driven by the commercial fishing industry and seasonal tourism. Many lodging facilities, restaurants and shops in the city cater mainly to tourists, and are only open for business during the summer tourist season, generally regarded as running from mid-May through mid-September. Other major employers in the city include the state-run Spring Creek Correctional Center, the Alaska Department of Labor and Workforce Development's AVTEC vocational school, and the loca

    The City of Seward employs a council–manager style of government, with a seven-member city council elected by the citizens, as well as a council-appointed city manager, city attorney and city clerk, responsible for all local administration including police, fire, utilities, and harbor management. At the borough level, Seward is situated in Kenai Peninsula Borough District 6, which has one seat on the nine-member borough council. This council oversees area-wide issues such as education ...

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    • 907
  6. Talk:Seward Highway/GA1 - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Talk:Seward_Highway/GA1

    "The Seward Highway officially reaches its northern terminus at an intersection with 5th Avenue. AK-1 continues on for a short period as 5th Avenue, before becoming known as the Glenn Highway." These sentences contradict each other. There are paragraphs of this Route description that are not referenced at all.

  7. Category:Seward Highway - Wikimedia Commons

    commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Category:Seward_Highway

    Seward Highway through Kenai Mountains, 1970s.jpg 2,790 × 2,350; 6.49 MB Seward Highway turnout, Jul 07.jpg 1,280 × 960; 294 KB Seward Highway-1.jpg 900 × 576; 81 KB

  8. Alaska Route 1 - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alaska_Route_1

    Alaska Route 1 (AK-1) is a state highway in the southern part of the U.S. state of Alaska.It runs from Homer northeast and east to Tok by way of Anchorage.It is one of two routes in Alaska to contain significant portions of freeway: the Seward Highway in south Anchorage and the Glenn Highway between Anchorage and Palmer.

  9. Seward Highway – Wikipedia

    sv.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seward_Highway

    Seward Highway är en landsväg i den amerikanska delstaten Alaska som sträcker sig ca 202 kilometer från Seward till Anchorage. Den stod färdig 1951 och löper genom natursköna Kenai Peninsula och Turnagain Arm, där den utsågs till National Scenic Byway av US Department of Transportation.

  10. Portage Glacier Highway - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Portage_Glacier_Highway

    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia The Portage Glacier Highway, or Portage Glacier Road, is a highway located in the U.S. state of Alaska. The highway is made up of a series of roads, bridges, and tunnels that connect the Portage Glacier area of the Chugach National Forest and the city of Whittier to the Seward Highway.

  11. The Seward Highway starts in Anchorage and winds south until it ends in the gorgeous town of Seward. Stretching for 127 miles between Anchorage and Seward, this road weaves through a landscape of astonishing beauty.