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  1. Sinitic languages - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Sinitic_languages

    The Sinitic languages, often synonymous with " Chinese languages ", constitute the major branch of the Sino-Tibetan language family. It is frequently proposed that there is a primary split between the Sinitic languages and the rest of the family (the Tibeto-Burman languages), but this view is rejected by an increasing number of researchers.

    • Languages

      Dialectologist Jerry Norman estimated that there are...

  2. Sinitic languages - Simple English Wikipedia, the free ...

    simple.wikipedia.org › wiki › Sinitic_languages

    From Simple English Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia The Sinitic languages, also called the " Chinese languages ", are a branch of Sino-Tibetan languages spoken mainly in China. Some think there is a split between Sinitic languages and the rest of the family (Tibeto-Burman languages), but many researchers now do not agree with this.

  3. Talk:Sinitic languages - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Talk:Sinitic_languages

    From what I gathered through google search, "Sinitic" or "Sinitic languages" pretty much all refers to Chinese. According to most dictionaries and encyclopedias (Britannica included), Sinitic is the same as Chinese, Chinese (Sinitic); "Sinitic" according to these dictionaries is simply another linguistic term for the Chinese language.

  4. Sinitic languages — Wikipedia Republished // WIKI 2

    wiki2.org › en › Sinitic_languages

    The Sinitic languages, often syn­ony­mous with " Chi­nese languages ", con­sti­tute the major branch of the Sino-Ti­betan lan­guage fam­ily.

  5. Semitic languages - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Semitic_languages

    The Semitic languages are a branch of the Afroasiatic language family originating in the Middle East. They are spoken by more than 330 million people across much of West Asia, North Africa, the Horn of Africa, Malta, in small pockets in the Caucasus as well as in often large immigrant and expatriate communities in North America, Europe and Australasia.

  6. File:Map of sinitic languages-en.svg - Wikimedia Commons

    commons.wikimedia.org › wiki › File:Map_of_sinitic

    Oct 14, 2020 · This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0 International, 3.0 Unported, 2.5 Generic, 2.0 Generic and 1.0 Generic license.: You are free: to share – to copy, distribute and transmit the work

    • 2004 (original); 2007-05-05 (SVG)
    • Wu Yue (original); Gohu1er (SVG)
    • File:Map of sinitic languages full-de.svg|{{language|de}
  7. Sino-Tibetan languages - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Sino-Tibetan_languages

    The study further suggests that there was an initial major split between the Sinitic languages and the Tibeto-Burman languages approximately 4,200 to 7,800 years ago (with an average of 5,900 years ago), associating this expansion with the Yangshao culture and/or the later Majiayao culture.

    • Proto-Sino-Tibetan
    • One of the world's primary language families
  8. Category:Sinitic languages - Wiktionary

    en.wiktionary.org › wiki › Category:Sinitic_languages

    Nov 07, 2019 · Fundamental » All languages » Languages by family » Sino-Tibetan » Sinitic This is the main category of the Sinitic languages . Information about Sinitic:

  9. Semitic languages - Simple English Wikipedia, the free ...

    simple.wikipedia.org › wiki › Semitic_languages

    The Semitic languages are a branch of the Afroasiatic language family, which originated in the Middle East. Semitic languages are spoken by more than 470 million people across much of Western Asia , North Africa and the Horn of Africa , as well as in large communities of people from different countries in North America and Europe .

  10. Languages of Taiwan - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Languages_of_Taiwan

    Traditional Chinese characters are widely used in Taiwan to write Sinitic languages including Mandarin, Taiwanese Hokkien and Hakka. The Ministry of Education maintains standards of writing for these languages, publications including the Standard Form of National Characters and the recommended characters for Taiwanese Hokkien and Hakka.

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