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    • Tachycardia - Wikipedia
      • From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Tachycardia, also called tachyarrhythmia, is a heart rate that exceeds the normal resting rate. In general, a resting heart rate over 100 beats per minute is accepted as tachycardia in adults.
      en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tachycardia
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  2. Tachycardia - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Tachycardia

    Tachycardia, also called tachyarrhythmia, is a heart rate that exceeds the normal resting rate. In general, a resting heart rate over 100 beats per minute is accepted as tachycardia in adults.

  3. Tachycardia - Simple English Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    simple.wikipedia.org › wiki › Tachycardia

    From Simple English Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Tachycardia is the fast beating of the heart. In adults, it refers to heart rates higher than 100 beats per minute. Tachycardia may be a normal physiological response to stress, but depending on the cause and how healthy the patient is, tachycardia could be harmful and need medical treatment.

  4. Atrial tachycardia - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Atrial_tachycardia

    Atrial tachycardia is a type of heart rhythm problem in which the heart 's electrical impulse comes from an ectopic pacemaker (that is, an abnormally located cardiac pacemaker) in the upper chambers (atria) of the heart, rather than from the sinoatrial node, the normal origin of the heart's electrical activity.

  5. Supraventricular tachycardia - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Supraventricular_tachycardia
    • Overview
    • Pathophysiology
    • Diagnosis
    • Prevention
    • Treatment

    Supraventricular tachycardia is an abnormally fast heart rhythm arising from improper electrical activity in the upper part of the heart. There are four main types: atrial fibrillation, paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia, atrial flutter, and Wolff–Parkinson–White syndrome. Symptoms may include palpitations, feeling faint, sweating, shortness of breath, or chest pain. They start from either the atria or atrioventricular node. They are generally due to one of two mechanisms: re-entry...

    The main pumping chamber, the ventricle, is protected against excessively high rates arising from the supraventricular areas by a "gating mechanism" at the atrioventricular node, which allows only a proportion of the fast impulses to pass through to the ventricles. An accesory "bypass tract" can avoid the AV node and its protection so the fast rate may be directly transmitted to the ventricles. This situation has characteristic findings on ECG. Ebstein's anomaly is the congenital heart lesion mo

    Subtypes of SVT can usually be distinguished by their electrocardiogram characteristics

    Once an acute arrhythmia has been terminated, ongoing treatment may be indicated to prevent recurrence. However, those that have an isolated episode, or infrequent and minimally symptomatic episodes, usually do not warrant any treatment other than observation. In general, patients with more frequent or disabling symptoms warrant some form of prevention. A variety of drugs including simple AV nodal blocking agents such as beta-blockers and verapamil, as well as anti-arrhythmics may be used, usual

    Most SVTs are unpleasant rather than life-threatening, although very fast heart rates can be problematic for those with underlying ischemic heart disease or the elderly. Episodes require treatment when they occur, but interval therapy may also be used to prevent or reduce recurrence. While some treatment modalities can be applied to all SVTs, there are specific therapies available to treat some sub-types. Effective treatment consequently requires knowledge of how and where the arrhythmia is init

  6. Ventricular tachycardia - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Ventricular_tachycardia
    • Overview
    • Signs and symptoms
    • Cause
    • Pathophysiology
    • Diagnosis
    • Treatment

    Ventricular tachycardia is a type of regular, fast heart rate that arises from improper electrical activity in the ventricles of the heart. Although a few seconds may not result in problems, longer periods are dangerous; and multiple episodes over a short period of time is referred to as an Electrical Storm. Short periods may occur without symptoms, or present with lightheadedness, palpitations, or chest pain. Ventricular tachycardia may result in ventricular fibrillation and turn into cardiac a

    While a few seconds may not result in problems, longer periods are dangerous. Short periods may occur without symptoms or present with lightheadedness, palpitations, or chest pain. Ventricular tachycardia may turn into ventricular fibrillation and can result in cardiac arrest.

    Ventricular tachycardia can occur due to coronary heart disease, aortic stenosis, cardiomyopathy, electrolyte problems, inherited channelopathies, catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia, arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia, or a myocardial infarction.

    The morphology of the tachycardia depends on its cause and the origin of the re-entry electrical circuit in the heart. In monomorphic ventricular tachycardia, the shape of each heart beat on the ECG looks the same because the impulse is either being generated from increased automaticity of a single point in either the left or the right ventricle, or due to a reentry circuit within the ventricle. The most common cause of monomorphic ventricular tachycardia is scarring of the heart muscle from a p

    The diagnosis of ventricular tachycardia is made based on the rhythm seen on either a 12-lead ECG or a telemetry rhythm strip. It may be very difficult to differentiate between ventricular tachycardia and a wide-complex supraventricular tachycardia in some cases. In particular, supraventricular tachycardias with aberrant conduction from a pre-existing bundle branch block are commonly misdiagnosed as ventricular tachycardia. Other rarer phenomena include Ashman beats and antedromic atrioventricul

    Therapy may be directed either at terminating an episode of the abnormal heart rhythm or at reducing the risk of another VT episode. The treatment for stable VT is tailored to the specific person, with regard to how well the individual tolerates episodes of ventricular tachycardia, how frequently episodes occur, their comorbidities, and their wishes. Individuals suffering from pulseless VT or unstable VT are hemodynamically compromised and require immediate electric cardioversion to shock them o

  7. Sinus tachycardia - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Sinus_tachycardia
    • Overview
    • Signs and symptoms
    • Cause
    • Diagnosis
    • Treatment

    Sinus tachycardia is an elevated sinus rhythm characterized by an increase in the rate of electrical impulses arising from the sinoatrial node. In adults, sinus tachycardia is defined as a heart rate greater than 100 beats/min. The normal resting heart rate is 60–100 bpm in an average male adult and 60-90 bpm in an average female adult. Normal heart rate varies with age, from infants having faster heart rates and the elderly having slower heart rates. Sinus tachycardia is a normal...

    Tachycardia is often asymptomatic. It is often a resulting symptom of a primary disease state and can be an indication of the severity of a disease. If the heart rate is too high, cardiac output may fall due to the markedly reduced ventricular filling time. Rapid rates, though they may be compensating for ischemia elsewhere, increase myocardial oxygen demand and reduce coronary blood flow, thus precipitating an ischemic heart or valvular disease. Sinus tachycardia accompanying a myocardial infar

    Sinus tachycardia is usually a response to physiological stress, such as exercise, or an increased sympathetic tone with increased catecholamine release, such as stress, fright, flight, and anger. Other causes include: 1. Pain 2. Fever 3. Anxiety 4. Dehydration 5. Malignant hyperthermia 6. Hypovolemia with hypotension and shock 7. Anemia 8. Hyperthyroidism 9. Mercury poisoning 10. Kawasaki disease 11. Pheochromocytoma 12. Sepsis 13. Pulmonary embolism 14. Acute coronary ischemia and myocardial i

    Sinus tachycardia is usually apparent on an ECG, but if the heart rate is above 140 bpm the P wave may be difficult to distinguish from the previous T wave and one may confuse it with a paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia or atrial flutter with a 2:1 block. Ways to distinguish the three are: 1. Vagal maneuvers to slow the rate and identification of P waves 2. administer AV blockers to identify atrial flutter with 2:1 block Heart sounds should also be listened to.

    Treatment for physiologic sinus tachycardia involves treating the underlying causes of the tachycardia response. Beta blockers may be used to decrease tachycardia in patients with certain conditions, such as ischemic heart disease and rate-related angina. In patients with inappropriate sinus tachycardia, careful titration of beta-blockers, salt loading, and hydration typically reduce symptoms. Patients who are unresponsive to such treatment can undergo catheter ablation to potentially repair the

  8. Paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Paroxysmal_supra
    • Overview
    • Signs and symptoms
    • Treatment

    Paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia is a type of supraventricular tachycardia, named for its intermittent episodes of abrupt onset and termination. Often people have no symptoms. Otherwise symptoms may include palpitations, feeling lightheaded, sweating, shortness of breath, and chest pain. The cause is not known. Risk factors include alcohol, caffeine, nicotine, psychological stress, and Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, which often is inherited. The underlying mechanism typically involves an

    Symptoms may include palpitations, feeling faint, sweating, shortness of breath, and chest pain. Episodes start and end suddenly.

    AV nodal blocking can be achieved in at least three ways

  9. Postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Postural_orthostatic

    Postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS) is a condition in which a change from lying to standing causes an abnormally large (or higher than normal) increase in heart beat rate. This occurs with symptoms that may include lightheadedness, trouble thinking, blurred vision, or weakness.

    • Antibodies against the Alpha 1 adrenergic receptor and muscarinic acetylcholine M4 receptor
    • Most common (modal) age of onset is 14 years
  10. Tachycardia: Fast Heart Rate | American Heart Association

    www.heart.org › tachycardia--fast-heart-rate

    Tachycardia refers to a heart rate that’s too fast. How that’s defined may depend on your age and physical condition. Generally speaking, for adults, a heart rate of more than 100 beats per minute (BPM) is considered too fast. View an animation of tachycardia.

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