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  1. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia For a list of words relating to West Germanic languages, see the West Germanic languages category of words in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. The main article for this category is West Germanic languages. Wikimedia Commons has media related to West Germanic languages.

    Category:West Germanic languages - Wikipedia

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:West_Germanic_languages
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  3. West Germanic languages - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/West_Germanic_languages

    Most agree that after East Germanic broke off (an event usually dated to the 2nd or 1st century BC), the remaining Germanic languages, the Northwest Germanic languages, divided into four main dialects: [obsolete source] North Germanic, and the three groups conventionally called "West Germanic", namely

  4. Category:West Germanic languages - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:West_Germanic...

    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia For a list of words relating to West Germanic languages, see the West Germanic languages category of words in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. The main article for this category is West Germanic languages. Wikimedia Commons has media related to West Germanic languages.

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  5. Germanic languages - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Germanic_languages

    Other West Germanic languages include Afrikaans, an offshoot of Dutch, with over 7.1 million native speakers; Low German, considered a separate collection of unstandardized dialects, with roughly 0.3 million native speakers and probably 6.7–10 million people who can understand it (at least 5 million in Germany and 1.7 million in the ...

  6. Germanic languages - Simple English Wikipedia, the free ...

    simple.wikipedia.org/wiki/West_Germanic_languages

    (Redirected from West Germanic languages) The Germanic languages are a branch of Indo-European languages. They came from one language, "Proto-Germanic", and were originally spoken in Northern, Western and Central Europe.

  7. List of Germanic languages - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Germanic_languages

    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia The Germanic languages include some 58 (SIL estimate) languages and dialects that originated in Europe; this language family is a part of the Indo-European language family. Each subfamily in this list contains subgroups and individual languages. The standard division of Germanic is into three branches,

  8. Frisian languages - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frisian_languages

    Frisian languages belong to the West Germanic branch of the Indo-European languages, the most widespread language family in Europe and the world. Its closest living genealogical relatives are the Anglic languages , i.e. English and Scots ( Anglo-Frisian languages ); together with the also closely related Low Saxon dialects the two groups make ...

  9. German language - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/German_language

    The East Germanic languages are now extinct, and Gothic is the only language in this branch which survives in written texts. The West Germanic languages, however, have undergone extensive dialectal subdivision and are now represented in modern languages such as English, German, Dutch, Yiddish, Afrikaans, and others.

  10. West Germanic languages | Britannica

    www.britannica.com/topic/West-Germanic-languages

    West Germanic languages, group of Germanic languages that developed in the region of the North Sea, Rhine-Weser, and Elbe. Out of the many local West Germanic dialects the following six modern standard languages have arisen: English, Frisian, Dutch (Netherlandic -Flemish), Afrikaans, German, and Yiddish.