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    • What language is spoken in Taiwan?

      Image courtesy of blog.glossika.com

      blog.glossika.com

      • The languages of Taiwan consist of several varieties of languages under families of Austronesian languages and Sino-Tibetan languages spoken in Taiwan. The Formosan languages, a branch of Austronesian languages, have been spoken by the Taiwanese aborigines in Taiwan for thousands of years.
      en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Languages_of_Taiwan#:~:text=The%20languages%20of%20Taiwan%20consist%20of%20several%20varieties,Taiwanese%20aborigines%20in%20Taiwan%20for%20thousands%20of%20years.
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  2. Languages of Taiwan - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Languages_of_Taiwan

    The languages of Taiwan consist of several varieties of languages under families of Austronesian languages and Sino-Tibetan languages spoken in Taiwan.The Formosan languages, a branch of Austronesian languages, have been spoken by the Taiwanese aborigines in Taiwan for thousands of years.

  3. What Languages Are Spoken In Taiwan? - WorldAtlas

    www.worldatlas.com/articles/what-languages-are...
    • What Languages Are Spoken in Taiwan?
    • Official Language of The Country
    • Vernacular Languages of Taiwan
    • Aboriginal Languages of Taiwan
    • Foreign/Immigrant Languages of Taiwan

    Taiwanese Hokkien, a topolect of the varieties of Chinese, is spoken by about 70% of the population of Taiwan. The main languages spoken in Taiwanese are dialects of Chinese, a situation which resulted from cultural imperialism of China on Taiwan. Japanese was also introduced to Taiwan during the Japan occupation of Taiwan. Some indigenous languages have managed to survive throughout the history and are spoken by a small minority, mainly the older generation.

    Mandarin Chinese is the official language of the country. Mandarin spoken in Taiwan assumes two forms the Standard Mandarin and theTaiwanese Mandarin (Hokkien). The Standard Mandarin was instituted as the official language during the occupation of the Kuomintang by the Chinese when the use of indigenous languages was highly discouraged. Taiwanese was influenced by Standard Mandarin, indigenous tongues, and other languages. Standard Mandarin is the language of instruction in schools and is mai...

    Taiwanese (Hokkien) is the primary language used in public and is visible in the transport system. Hokkien is especially significant outside Taipei. The language developed as the Southern Min dialect of Fujian and is the most popular Chinese dialect for Chinese living in other countries. After continuous suppression during the Japanese and Chinese occupations, Hokkien re-emerged with the surge in democracy during the 1990s. The young population in Taiwan is growing up bilingual, with a comman...

    The aboriginal inhabitants of Taiwan continue to pride in their native tongues. Believed to have lived in the country for about 10,000 years, the indigenous groups make up a minority of the total population. These languages are on the brink of extinction and only spoken by an aging population. The strongest of these languages is the Amis, which is being kept alive by relentless education programs. Another language, Siraya, thought to have been extinct is being revived by enthusiasts.

    During the Japanese occupation of Taiwan (1895-1945), Japanese was introduced to the country through sustained efforts. Japanese is subsequently more popular with the older generation and is the second largest foreign language in the country. The language is also spoken by business people who studied in Japan and a population of urban youth who look to Japan as a cradle of pop culture.

  4. Taiwan Language - What languages do people speak in Taiwan?

    www.taiwanese-secrets.com/taiwan-language
    • Taiwan Language Information
    • History of Languages in Taiwan
    • Mandarin Chinese in Taiwan
    • Taiwan Language – in Conclusion

    The question of Taiwan’s linguistic situation can be a bit confusing to some travelers, foreigners and newcomers. Do they speak Chinese? Is it the same as Mandarin? Is Taiwanese different from Chinese? What about Hokkien? Hakka? Let’s dive in.

    A bit of historical demography: Though it is a broadly-defined ethnic group, Han Chinese people make up 98% of the population of Taiwan. This is mostly due to centuries of migration from mainland China, which began in the 17th century. Surprisingly, that puts the indigenous population at only 2%. This is a bit misleading. Han Chinese includes within it many other ethnic and linguistic variations, the most prominent of which with regard to Taiwan being the Hakka and Fujianese.Read some facts a...

    Mandarin Chinese is the most widely spoken language in Taiwan today.Mandarin Chinese began its true takeover of the island in the 1940s, during the Chinese Civil War which found, for the first time, massive amounts of the Chinese elite making their way across the Taiwan Strait.Previous to this time, settlers of Taiwan were mostly those looking to make a buck or flee politically conflicted areas – they had no linguistic pretentions of any kind. That changed in 1945 when the ruling Kuomintang (...

    Mandarin is here to stay, and in fact many younger Taiwanese people, especially in Taipei, have a much better command of English than of Hakka or Taiwanese. As a final note, keep in mind that Hakka, Taiwanese and Mandarin all use the same writing script. Therefore, even if someone can’t understand spoken Mandarin, they can read it perfectly.I hope you found this page about the languages of Taiwan useful!Return from Taiwan Language to Taiwanese CultureReturn to Taiwanese Secrets Homepage

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  5. Taiwan - Languages | Britannica

    www.britannica.com/place/Taiwan/Languages

    Taiwan - Taiwan - Languages: Each aboriginal group speaks a distinct language that generally is unintelligible to other groups. The aboriginal people had no written language until they made contact with the Dutch in the 17th century. The Hakka have their own language, which has affinities with both Cantonese and Mandarin Chinese. The Fukien Taiwanese speak Minnan, a form of Southern Min (often ...

  6. What Languages Are Spoken In Taiwan? | Crazy Spoken

    www.crazyspoken.com/what-languages-are-spoken-in...

    The language is taught in schools, a situation which has been attributed to the increasing population of young English proficient speakers. Mandarin Chinese is the official language of the country. Mandarin spoken in Taiwan assumes two forms the Standard Mandarin and theTaiwanese Mandarin (Hokkien).

  7. Languages Spoken in Taiwan | One Hour Translation

    www.onehourtranslation.com/translation/blog/...

    Mandarin. Mandarin Chinese has been the official language of Taiwan since 1945, and is the most spoken language in the country. It’s remarkably unchanged from the mainland variant of Mandarin that immigrants brought out, primarily in the 1940s as they escaped political and military upheaval in that country.

  8. Taiwan Guide: Official languages of Taiwan, Spoken and ...

    www.justlanded.com/.../Official-languages-of-Taiwan

    Taiwan’s history and geography have had a huge impact on the range of languages that are commonly found within its borders. From various forms of Chinese, to English, and the dialects of the native inhabitants, many different cultures have influenced the spoken and written word.

  9. The Languages of Taiwan | Island Folklore

    islandfolklore.com/about/taiwan/languages
    • Formosan Languages
    • Sinitic Languages
    • Language vs Dialect

    The Austronesian languages—from places like Madagascar, the Philippines, Malaysia, Indonesia and Polynesian islands like New Zealand, Hawaii and Samoa—are an extraordinarily diverse and widespread family of related languages. Linguists have pinpointed Taiwan as the original homeland of all Austronesian peoples. After centuries of extensive maritime exploration and migration, the Austronesian languages have spread far beyond the shores of Taiwan. The dialects of those who remained in Taiwan form the Formosan group of languages that continue to be spoken on the island. The Formosan languages are some of the oldest and most diverse branches of the greater Austronesian family.

    The Sinitic (Chinese) languages comprise one of the two main branches of the larger Sino-Tibetan language family. This Chinese branch is made up of numerous languages and dialects. Three distinct varieties are widespread in Taiwan—Taiwanese, Hakka and Mandarin. While Taiwanese is traditionally the most widely spoken language in Taiwan, Mandarin—introduced to Taiwan after World War Two—serves as the island’s primary lingua francaand is the most common second-language in Taiwan.

    “A language is a dialect with an army and navy.” So the saying goes—on the arbitrariness of the distinction between the two. Linguists currently have no universally accepted method for distinguishing between “language” and “dialect.” In academic circles, “variety” usually replaces the two poorly defined terms. The most widely used criterion by scholars to meaningfully distinguish between languages and dialects is “mutual intelligibility.” So if speakers of two varieties can easily communicate with each other, then the two varieties are more likely to be regarded as dialects. If speakers of two varieties are unable to easily understand each other, then their two respective varieties may be regarded as distinct (but possibly still related) languages. The languages of Taiwan fall into two main groups: Formosan (indigenous) and Sinitic (Chinese). Within each of Taiwan’s language families, varieties are sometimes regarded as dialects (like how English and Arabic are each respectively see...

  10. What language is spoken in Taiwan: features and interesting ...

    en.sodiummedia.com/4132293-what-language-is...

    What languages are spoken in Taiwan. For Taiwan, the situation is relatively simple: there are three Chinese dialects. Mandarin (North Chinese) is the official national language, and it is spoken by almost all residents. The second adverb, often referred to as Taiwanese, is widespread, especially outside of Taipei, the capital of the island.

  11. How Widely Spoken is English in Taiwan? – How Widely Spoken

    howwidelyspoken.com/how-widely-spoken-english-taiwan

    The city of Tainan in the south of Taiwan has launched a 10 year project in 2015 trying to make English a co-official language in the city. Learning Some Mandarin Thailand is actually quite a complex country in terms of languages , with many different ones spoken, but the major official language is Taiwanese Mandarin, spoken by over 80% of the ...