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      • The convertible mark was established by the 1995 Dayton Agreement. It replaced the Bosnia and Herzegovina dinar, Croatian kuna and Republika Srpska dinar as the single currency of Bosnia and Herzegovina in 1998. Mark refers to the German mark, the currency to which it was pegged at par.
      en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bosnia_and_Herzegovina_convertible_mark
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    When was the Mark introduced in Bosnia and Herzegovina?

    When was the Bosnian convertible Mark pegged to the Euro?

    What is the BAM ( Bosnia Herzegovina convertible mark )?

    When was the currency of Bosnia and Herzegovina created?

  2. Bosnia and Herzegovina convertible mark - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Bosnia_and_Herzegovina

    The convertible mark was established by the 1995 Dayton Agreement. It replaced the Bosnia and Herzegovina dinar, Croatian kuna and Republika Srpska dinar as the single currency of Bosnia and Herzegovina in 1998. Mark refers to the German mark, the currency to which it was pegged at par. Etymology. The names derive from the German language.

  3. Bosnia-Herzegovina Convertible Mark (BAM) Definition

    www.investopedia.com › terms › b
    • What Is The Bosnia-Herzegovina Convertible Mark (BAM)?
    • Understanding The Bam
    • Real World Example of The Bam

    The Bosnia-Herzegovina Convertible Mark (BAM) is the national currencyof Bosnia and Herzegovina. It is comprised of 100 subunits called fenings and was first introduced in 1995.

    The Central Bank of Bosnia and Herzegovina, established in 1997, issues and circulates the Bosnia-Herzegovina convertible mark (BAM).1 The creation of the central bank, as well as the convertible mark, came as part of the Dayton Agreement. This diplomatic agreement marked the end of the Bosnian War, forming the basic governing structure of modern Bosnia and Herzegovina. The newly-created BAM replaced two currencies that were previously used in the region: the Bosnian dinar and the Croatian kuna. Instead, the BAM became the sole currency for Bosnia-Herzegovina. While the BAM was initially pegged to the German Deutschmark (D-Mark) at par, its exchange rate was fixed to the euro (EUR) at a rate of 1 EUR per 1.95583 BAM when Germany adopted the EUR in 2002.2 Today, the BAM is distributed in banknotes in denominations of 10, 20, 50, 100, and 200 marks. Its coins, meanwhile, are circulated in denominations of 1, 2, and 5 marks. Smaller coins are also available, in denominations of 5, 10...

    Bosnia and Herzegovina, located on the coast of the Adriatic Sea, was a portion of Yugoslavia until 1992 when it achieved its independence. The area is home to three main ethnic groups: the Bosniaks, the Serbs, and the Croats. This mixture has led not only to a vibrant cultural existence but also to years of bitter conflict. Currently, the country has a three-member presidency with one member from each ethnic group.5 Bosnia and Herzegovina have an economy as varied as their history and culture. The Bosnian War of the 1990s caused substantial damage to the economy, but the country has since begun to rebound. Tourism and information technology services make up two of the country’s largest export industries, although the country also has experience in certain specialty manufacturing sectors such as car seats and footwear products.6

  4. Bosnia and Herzegovina convertible mark wiki | TheReaderWiki

    thereaderwiki.com › en › Bosnia_and_Herzegovina
    • History
    • Coins
    • Banknotes
    • Exchange Rates
    • Mistakes
    • See Also

    The convertible mark was established by the 1995 Dayton Agreement. It replaced the Bosnia and Herzegovina dinar, Croatian kuna and Republika Srpska dinar as the single currency of Bosnia and Herzegovina in 1998. Mark refers to the German mark, the currency to which it was peggedat par.

    In December 1998, coins were introduced in denominations of 10, 20 and 50 fenings/pfenigs. Coins of 1, 2 and 5 marks were introduced later. The coins were designed by Bosnian designer Kenan Zekic and minted at the Royal Mint in Llantrisant (Wales, UK).

    In 1998, notes were introduced in denominations of 50 fenings/pfenigs, 1 mark, 5, 10, 20, 50 and 100 marks. 200-mark notes were added in 2002, whilst the 50-fening/pfenig, 1- and 5-mark notes were later withdrawn from circulation. All current notes are valid throughout the country. The banknotes are issued by the Central Bank of Bosnia Herzegovina, with distinct designs for the entities of Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina and the Republika Srpska,1 except for the largest denomination – 200-mark note. On the notes of the Republika Srpska, inscriptions are printed in Cyrillic, then Latin script, and vice versa. Banknotes, with the exception of the 200-mark note, are printed by the French company Oberthur.

    Initially the mark was pegged to the German mark at par. Since the replacement of the German mark by the euro in 2002, the Bosnian convertible mark uses the same fixed exchange rate to euro that the German mark had (that is, 1 EUR = 1.95583 BAM).

    Banknotes and coins of Bosnia and Herzegovina have many mistakes and inconsistencies. Officially, only one banknote has not been released in circulation because of a mistake, even though other banknotes with mistakes had been issued.

  5. Bosnia and Herzegovina convertible mark - Wiki

    en.wikiredia.com › wiki › Bosnia_and_Herzegovina

    The convertible mark was established by the 1995 Dayton Agreement. It replaced the Bosnia and Herzegovina dinar, Croatian kuna and Republika Srpska dinar as the single currency of Bosnia and Herzegovina in 1998. Mark refers to the German mark, the currency to which it was pegged at par. Etymology. The names derive from the German language

  6. Bosnia and Herzegovina convertible mark - Infogalactic: the ...

    infogalactic.com › info › Bosnia_and_Herzegovina

    The convertible mark was established by the 1995 Dayton Agreement. It replaced the Bosnia and Herzegovina dinar, Croatian kuna and Republika Srpska dinar as the single currency of Bosnia and Herzegovina in 1998. Mark refers to the German mark, the currency to which it was pegged at par.

  7. Bosnia and Herzegovina convertible mark - WikiMili, The Best ...

    wikimili.com › en › Bosnia_and_Herzegovina

    Dec 24, 2020 · The convertible mark was established by the 1995 Dayton Agreement. It replaced the Bosnia and Herzegovina dinar, Croatian kuna and Republika Srpska dinar as the single currency of Bosnia and Herzegovina in 1998. Mark refers to the German mark, the currency to which it was pegged at par. [1] Etymology. The names derive from the German language.

  8. Bosnian Currency - Saric

    saric.us › Family Member Pages › Muhamed

    On June 22, 1998, Bosnian Central Bank introduced the current monetary unit called konvertibilna marka(convertible mark). One Bosnian marka has 100 fenings. Bosnian currency was once pegged 1-to-1 to the Deutsche Mark, thus the namesmarkaand fenings (from German Pfennig).

  9. Exchange Bosnia and Herzegovina convertible marks in 3 easy ...

    www.leftovercurrency.com › exchange › bosnia-and

    The Bosnia and Herzegovina convertible Mark was introduced as the currency of the former Yugoslavian country of Bosnia-Herzegovina in 1998. It was originally pegged to the pre-Euro currency of Germany, the Deutsche Mark. Similar to the German Mark, the Bosnia and Herzegovina convertible Mark is subdivided into 100 pfenigs.

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