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  1. Eureka! The Archimedes Principle | Live Science

    www.livescience.com/58839-archimedes-principle.html
    • Biography
    • 'Eureka! Eureka!'
    • The Archimedes Principle
    • Uses of The Archimedes Principle
    • Current Research

    Archimedes lived in Syracuse on the island of Sicily in the third century B.C. At that time, Syracuse was one of the most influential cities of the ancient world, according to Scientific American. Trading vessels from Egypt, Greece and Phoenicia filled the city-state's harbor. It was also a hub of commerce, art and science, according to the Archimedes Palimpsest.After studying geometry and astronomy in Alexandria, the \\"greatest intellectual center in the ancient world,\\" according to Scientifi...

    Archimedes has gone down in history as the guy who ran naked through the streets of Syracuse shouting \\"Eureka!\\" — or \\"I have it!\\" in Greek. The story behind that event was that Archimedes was charged with proving that a new crown made for Hieron, the king of Syracuse, was not pure gold as the goldsmith had claimed. The story was first written down in the first century B.C. by Vitruvius, a Roman architect. Archimedes thought long and hard but could not find a method for proving that the crown...

    According to Boundless, the Archimedes principle states that the buoyant force on an object submerged in a fluid is equal to the weight of the fluid that is displaced by that object. If a glass is filled to the top with water and then ice cubes are added to it, what happens? Just like the water spilled over the edge when Archimedes entered his bathtub, the water in the glass will spill over when ice cubes are added to it. If the water that spilled out were weighed (weight is a downward force)...

    The Archimedes principle is a very useful and versatile tool. It can be useful in measuring the volume of irregular objects, such as gold crowns, as well as explaining the behaviors of any object placed in any fluid. Archimedes' principle describes how ships float, submarines dive, hot air balloons fly, and many others examples, according to Science Clarified. The Archimedes principle is also used in a large variety of scientific research subjects including medical, engineering, entomology, e...

    Bone volumes/densitiesThe Archimedes principle has many uses in the medical and dentistry field and is used to determine the densities of bones and teeth. In a 1997 paper published in the journal Medical Engineering & Physics, researchers used the Archimedes principle to measure the volume of the inside spongy part of the bone, also known as the cancellous bone. The volume fraction of the cancellous bone can be used in various age and health studies including being an index in aging studies,...

  2. Russian scientists have discovered a new physical paradox ...

    www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2020-07/ptgs-rsh...

    Russian scientists have discovered a new physical paradox Scientists offered their explanation on how to eliminate the Fermi-Pasta-Ulam-Tsingou paradox. Peter the Great Saint-Petersburg ...

  3. What Is the Black Hole Information Paradox? | Space

    www.space.com/black-hole-information-paradox...

    Related: Eureka! Scientists ... As Stephen Hawking first discovered in the 1970s, black holes aren't entirely black. ... What's exciting about this paradox is that all of the potential answers ...

  4. Edgar Allan Poe’s Eureka and the Big Bang | by Paul Halpern ...

    medium.com/starts-with-a-bang/edgar-allen-poe-s...

    Jul 07, 2015 · In his final work Eureka — A ... for fans of the macabre, parts of the world are murky not gleaming. Therefore, Olbers’ paradox warranted sound explanation. ... we’ve discovered far more ...

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  6. Archimedes’ principle | Description & Facts | Britannica

    www.britannica.com/science/Archimedes-principle

    Archimedes’ principle, physical law of buoyancy, discovered by the ancient Greek mathematician and inventor Archimedes, stating that any body completely or partially submerged in a fluid (gas or liquid) at rest is acted upon by an upward, or buoyant, force, the magnitude of which is equal to the weight of the fluid displaced by the body.

  7. List of Eureka characters - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Eureka_characters

    Holly Marten is a socially inept scientist sent to Eureka to assist with the upcoming mission to Titan. Although brilliant, she is painfully awkward with human relationships, which complicates Fargo's determined wooing of her. She was murdered by Senator Wen when she discovered she and the rest of the Astreaus crew were in a computer program.

  8. New 'frozen dragon' pterosaur found hiding in plain sight

    www.nationalgeographic.com/science/2019/09/...

    Sep 10, 2019 · A new study in the Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology describes a new pterosaur called Cryodrakon boreas, "frozen dragon of the north winds."The flying reptile had a wingspan of at least 16 feet ...

  9. Olbers' paradox - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Olbers's_Paradox

    In astrophysics and physical cosmology, Olbers' paradox, named after the German astronomer Heinrich Wilhelm Olbers (1758–1840), also known as the "dark night sky paradox", is the argument that the darkness of the night sky conflicts with the assumption of an infinite and eternal static universe.

  10. Stein's example - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stein's_example

    The estimators of Stein's paradox are, for a given θ, better than X for some values of X but necessarily worse for others (except perhaps for one particular θ vector, for which the new estimate is always better than X). It is only on average that they are better.

  11. List of multiple discoveries - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_multiple_discoveries

    1984: Comet Levy-Rudenko was discovered independently by David H. Levy on 13 November 1984 and the next evening by Michael Rudenko. (It was the first of 23 comets discovered by Levy, who is famous as the 1993 co-discoverer of Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9, the first comet ever observed crashing into a planet, Jupiter.)