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  1. Stress symptoms: Effects on your body and behavior - Mayo Clinic

    www.mayoclinic.org › stress-symptoms › art-20050987

    Also, get emergency help immediately if you have chest pain, especially if you also have shortness of breath, jaw or back pain, pain radiating into your shoulder and arm, sweating, dizziness, or nausea. These may be warning signs of a heart attack and not simply stress symptoms. April 04, 2019. Show references.

  2. Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) - Symptoms and causes ...

    www.mayoclinic.org › symptoms-causes › syc-20355967
    • Overview
    • Symptoms
    • Causes
    • Risk Factors
    • Complications
    • Prevention

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a mental health condition that's triggered by a terrifying event — either experiencing it or witnessing it. Symptoms may include flashbacks, nightmares and severe anxiety, as well as uncontrollable thoughts about the event.Most people who go through traumatic events may have temporary difficulty adjusting and coping, but with time and good self-care, they usually get better. If the symptoms get worse, last for months or even years, and interfere with y...

    Post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms may start within one month of a traumatic event, but sometimes symptoms may not appear until years after the event. These symptoms cause significant problems in social or work situations and in relationships. They can also interfere with your ability to go about your normal daily tasks.PTSD symptoms are generally grouped into four types: intrusive memories, avoidance, negative changes in thinking and mood, and changes in physical and emotional reactions...

    You can develop post-traumatic stress disorder when you go through, see or learn about an event involving actual or threatened death, serious injury or sexual violation.Doctors aren't sure why some people get PTSD. As with most mental health problems, PTSD is probably caused by a complex mix of: 1. Stressful experiences, including the amount and severity of trauma you've gone through in your life 2. Inherited mental health risks, such as a family history of anxiety and depression 3. Inherited...

    People of all ages can have post-traumatic stress disorder. However, some factors may make you more likely to develop PTSD after a traumatic event, such as: 1. Experiencing intense or long-lasting trauma 2. Having experienced other trauma earlier in life, such as childhood abuse 3. Having a job that increases your risk of being exposed to traumatic events, such as military personnel and first responders 4. Having other mental health problems, such as anxiety or depression 5. Having problems w...

    Post-traumatic stress disorder can disrupt your whole life ― your job, your relationships, your health and your enjoyment of everyday activities.Having PTSD may also increase your risk of other mental health problems, such as: 1. Depression and anxiety 2. Issues with drugs or alcohol use 3. Eating disorders 4. Suicidal thoughts and actions

    After surviving a traumatic event, many people have PTSD-like symptoms at first, such as being unable to stop thinking about what's happened. Fear, anxiety, anger, depression, guilt — all are common reactions to trauma. However, the majority of people exposed to trauma do not develop long-term post-traumatic stress disorder.Getting timely help and support may prevent normal stress reactions from getting worse and developing into PTSD. This may mean turning to family and friends who will liste...

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  4. Anxiety disorders - Symptoms and causes - Mayo Clinic

    www.mayoclinic.org › symptoms-causes › syc-20350961
    • Overview
    • Symptoms
    • Causes
    • Risk Factors
    • Complications
    • Prevention

    Experiencing occasional anxiety is a normal part of life. However, people with anxiety disorders frequently have intense, excessive and persistent worry and fear about everyday situations. Often, anxiety disorders involve repeated episodes of sudden feelings of intense anxiety and fear or terror that reach a peak within minutes (panic attacks).These feelings of anxiety and panic interfere with daily activities, are difficult to control, are out of proportion to the actual danger and can last...

    Common anxiety signs and symptoms include: 1. Feeling nervous, restless or tense 2. Having a sense of impending danger, panic or doom 3. Having an increased heart rate 4. Breathing rapidly (hyperventilation) 5. Sweating 6. Trembling 7. Feeling weak or tired 8. Trouble concentrating or thinking about anything other than the present worry 9. Having trouble sleeping 10. Experiencing gastrointestinal (GI) problems 11. Having difficulty controlling worry 12. Having the urge to avoid things that tr...

    The causes of anxiety disorders aren't fully understood. Life experiences such as traumatic events appear to trigger anxiety disorders in people who are already prone to anxiety. Inherited traits also can be a factor.

    These factors may increase your risk of developing an anxiety disorder: 1. Trauma. Children who endured abuse or trauma or witnessed traumatic events are at higher risk of developing an anxiety disorder at some point in life. Adults who experience a traumatic event also can develop anxiety disorders. 2. Stress due to an illness. Having a health condition or serious illness can cause significant worry about issues such as your treatment and your future. 3. Stress buildup. A big event or a buil...

    Having an anxiety disorder does more than make you worry. It can also lead to, or worsen, other mental and physical conditions, such as: 1. Depression (which often occurs with an anxiety disorder) or other mental health disorders 2. Substance misuse 3. Trouble sleeping (insomnia) 4. Digestive or bowel problems 5. Headaches and chronic pain 6. Social isolation 7. Problems functioning at school or work 8. Poor quality of life 9. Suicide

    There's no way to predict for certain what will cause someone to develop an anxiety disorder, but you can take steps to reduce the impact of symptoms if you're anxious: 1. Get help early. Anxiety, like many other mental health conditions, can be harder to treat if you wait. 2. Stay active. Participate in activities that you enjoy and that make you feel good about yourself. Enjoy social interaction and caring relationships, which can lessen your worries. 3. Avoid alcohol or drug use. Alcohol a...

  5. Stress fractures - Symptoms and causes - Mayo Clinic

    www.mayoclinic.org › diseases-conditions › stress
    • Overview
    • Symptoms
    • Causes
    • Risk Factors
    • Complications
    • Prevention

    Stress fractures are tiny cracks in a bone. They're caused by repetitive force, often from overuse — such as repeatedly jumping up and down or running long distances. Stress fractures can also develop from normal use of a bone that's weakened by a condition such as osteoporosis.Stress fractures are most common in the weight-bearing bones of the lower leg and foot. Track and field athletes and military recruits who carry heavy packs over long distances are at highest risk, but anyone can susta...

    At first, you might barely notice the pain associated with a stress fracture, but it tends to worsen with time. The tenderness usually starts at a specific spot and decreases during rest. You might have swelling around the painful area.

    Stress fractures often result from increasing the amount or intensity of an activity too quickly.Bone adapts gradually to increased loads through remodeling, a normal process that speeds up when the load on the bone increases. During remodeling, bone tissue is destroyed (resorption), then rebuilt.Bones subjected to unaccustomed force without enough time for recovery resorb cells faster than your body can replace them, which makes you more susceptible to stress fractures.

    Factors that can increase your risk of stress fractures include: 1. Certain sports. Stress fractures are more common in people who engage in high-impact sports, such as track and field, basketball, tennis, dance or gymnastics. 2. Increased activity. Stress fractures often occur in people who suddenly shift from a sedentary lifestyle to an active training regimen or who rapidly increase the intensity, duration or frequency of training sessions. 3. Sex. Women, especially those who have abnormal...

    Some stress fractures don't heal properly, which can cause chronic problems. If underlying causes are not taken care of, you may be at higher risk of additional stress fractures.

    Simple steps can help you prevent stress fractures. 1. Make changes slowly. Start any new exercise program slowly and progress gradually. Avoid increasing the amount you exercise by more than 10% a week. 2. Use proper footwear. Make sure your shoes fit well and are appropriate for your activity. If you have flat feet, ask your doctor about arch supports for your shoes. 3. Cross-train. Add low-impact activities to your exercise regimen to avoid repetitively stressing a particular part of your...

  6. Social anxiety disorder (social phobia) - Symptoms and causes ...

    www.mayoclinic.org › symptoms-causes › syc-20353561
    • Overview
    • Symptoms
    • Causes
    • Risk Factors
    • Complications
    • Prevention

    It's normal to feel nervous in some social situations. For example, going on a date or giving a presentation may cause that feeling of butterflies in your stomach. But in social anxiety disorder, also called social phobia, everyday interactions cause significant anxiety, fear, self-consciousness and embarrassment because you fear being scrutinized or judged by others.In social anxiety disorder, fear and anxiety lead to avoidance that can disrupt your life. Severe stress can affect your daily...

    Feelings of shyness or discomfort in certain situations aren't necessarily signs of social anxiety disorder, particularly in children. Comfort levels in social situations vary, depending on personality traits and life experiences. Some people are naturally reserved and others are more outgoing.In contrast to everyday nervousness, social anxiety disorder includes fear, anxiety and avoidance that interfere with daily routine, work, school or other activities. Social anxiety disorder typically b...

    Like many other mental health conditions, social anxiety disorder likely arises from a complex interaction of biological and environmental factors. Possible causes include 1. Inherited traits. Anxiety disorders tend to run in families. However, it isn't entirely clear how much of this may be due to genetics and how much is due to learned behavior. 2. Brain structure. A structure in the brain called the amygdala (uh-MIG-duh-luh) may play a role in controlling the fear response. People who have...

    Several factors can increase the risk of developing social anxiety disorder, including: 1. Family history. You're more likely to develop social anxiety disorder if your biological parents or siblings have the condition. 2. Negative experiences. Children who experience teasing, bullying, rejection, ridicule or humiliation may be more prone to social anxiety disorder. In addition, other negative events in life, such as family conflict, trauma or abuse, may be associated with social anxiety diso...

    Left untreated, social anxiety disorder can run your life. Anxieties can interfere with work, school, relationships or enjoyment of life. Social anxiety disorder can cause: 1. Low self-esteem 2. Trouble being assertive 3. Negative self-talk 4. Hypersensitivity to criticism 5. Poor social skills 6. Isolation and difficult social relationships 7. Low academic and employment achievement 8. Substance abuse, such as drinking too much alcohol 9. Suicide or suicide attemptsOther anxiety disorders an...

    There's no way to predict what will cause someone to develop an anxiety disorder, but you can take steps to reduce the impact of symptoms if you're anxious: 1. Get help early. Anxiety, like many other mental health conditions, can be harder to treat if you wait. 2. Keep a journal. Keeping track of your personal life can help you and your mental health professional identify what's causing you stress and what seems to help you feel better. 3. Prioritize issues in your life. You can reduce anxie...

  7. COVID-19 and your mental health - Mayo Clinic

    www.mayoclinic.org › diseases-conditions › corona

    During the COVID-19 pandemic, you may experience stress, anxiety, fear, sadness and loneliness. And mental health disorders, including anxiety and depression, can worsen. Surveys show a major increase in the number of U.S. adults who report symptoms of stress, anxiety and depression during the pandemic, compared with surveys before the pandemic.

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