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  1. Should we treat pyrexia? And how do we do it? | Critical Care ...

    ccforum.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s...

    Oct 03, 2016 · The concept of pyrexia as a protective physiological response to aid in host defence has been challenged with the awareness of the severe metabolic stress induced by pyrexia. The host response to pyrexia varies, however, according to the disease profile and severity and, as such, the management of pyrexia should differ; for example, temperature control is safe and effective in septic shock but ...

    • James F. Doyle, Frédérique Schortgen
    • 12
    • 2016
  2. The pathophysiological basis and consequences of fever ...

    ccforum.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s...

    Jul 14, 2016 · Fever has its etymological basis in Latin, meaning simply ‘heat’, and pyrexia comes from the Greek ‘pyr’, meaning fire or fever. Some sources use the terms interchangeably, whereas others preserve ‘fever’ to mean a raised temperature caused by the action of thermoregulatory pyrogens on the hypothalamus; for instance, in sepsis and inflammatory conditions [ 3 ].

    • Edward James Walter, Sameer Hanna-Jumma, Mike Carraretto, Lui Forni
    • 110
    • 2016
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  4. Clinical review: Brain-body temperature differences in adults ...

    ccforum.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/cc11892

    Apr 22, 2013 · Surrogate or 'proxy' measures of brain temperature are used in the routine management of patients with brain damage. The prevailing view is that the brain is 'hotter' than the body. The polarity and magnitude of temperature differences between brain and body, however, remains unclear after severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). The focus of this systematic review is on the adult patient admitted ...

    • Charmaine Childs, Kueh Wern Lunn
    • 19
    • 2013
  5. Body temperature patterns as a predictor of hospital-acquired ...

    ccforum.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/cc12894

    Sep 12, 2013 · Early treatment of sepsis improves survival, but early diagnosis of hospital-acquired sepsis, especially in critically ill patients, is challenging. Evidence suggests that subtle changes in body temperature patterns may be an early indicator of sepsis, but data is limited. The aim of this study was to examine whether abnormal body temperature patterns, as identified by visual examination ...

    • Anne M Drewry, Brian M Fuller, Thomas C Bailey, Richard S Hotchkiss
    • 29
    • 2013
  6. Fever management in intensive care patients with infections ...

    ccforum.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/cc13773

    Mar 18, 2014 · 'Humanity has but three great enemies: fever, famine and war; of these by far the greatest, by far the most terrible, is fever' [].Fever is one of the cardinal signs of infection and, nearly 120 years after William Osier's statement in his address to the 47 th annual meeting of the American Medical Association [], infectious diseases remain a major cause of morbidity and mortality.

    • Paul J Young, Manoj Saxena
    • 27
    • 2014
  7. Peripheral arterial blood pressure monitoring adequately ...

    ccforum.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/cc4852

    Invasive arterial blood pressure monitoring is a common practice in intensive care units (ICUs). Accuracy of invasive blood pressure monitoring is crucial in evaluating the cardiocirculatory system and adjusting drug therapy for hemodynamic support. However, the best site for catheter insertion is controversial. Lack of definitive information in critically ill patients makes it difficult to ...

  8. The neurological and cognitive consequences of hyperthermia ...

    ccforum.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s...

    Jul 14, 2016 · An elevated temperature has many aetiologies, both infective and non-infective, and while the fever of sepsis probably confers benefit, there is increasing evidence that the central nervous system is particularly vulnerable to damage from hyperthermia. A single episode of hyperthermia may cause short-term neurological and cognitive dysfunction, which may be prolonged or become permanent. The ...

  9. Nucleated red blood cells in the blood of medical intensive ...

    ccforum.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/cc5932

    Jun 05, 2007 · In critically ill patients, the appearance of nucleated red blood cells (NRBCs) in blood is associated with a variety of severe diseases. Generally, when NRBCs are detected in the patients' blood, the prognosis is poor. In a prospective study, the detection of NRBCs was used for a daily monitoring of 383 medical intensive care patients. The incidence of NRBCs in medical intensive care patients ...

  10. The late phase of sepsis is characterized by an increased ...

    ccforum.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/cc10332

    Jul 28, 2011 · Recent models capturing the pathophysiology of sepsis and ex-vivo data from patients are speculating about immunosuppression in the so-called late phase of sepsis. Clinical data regarding survival and microbiological burden are missing. The aim of this study was to determine the clinical significance of the 'late phase' of sepsis with respect to overall survival and occurrence of ...