Yahoo Web Search

  1. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia An achondrite is a stony meteorite that does not contain chondrules. It consists of material similar to terrestrial basalts or plutonic rocks and has been differentiated and reprocessed to a lesser or greater degree due to melting and recrystallization on or within meteorite parent bodies.

    Achondrite - Wikipedia

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Achondrite
  2. Achondrite - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Achondrite

    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia An achondrite is a stony meteorite that does not contain chondrules. It consists of material similar to terrestrial basalts or plutonic rocks and has been differentiated and reprocessed to a lesser or greater degree due to melting and recrystallization on or within meteorite parent bodies.

    • Stony
  3. Primitive achondrite - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Primitive_achondrite

    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Primitive achondrites are a subdivision of meteorites. They are classified on the same rank (historically called "Class") and lying between chondrites and achondrites. They are called primitive because they are achondrites that have retained much of their original chondritic properties.

  4. People also ask

    What kind of rock is an achondrite made of?

    Which is the most primitive group of achondrites?

    What kind of meteorite has chondrules in it?

    How did the ordinary chondrite get its name?

  5. Achondrite - Simple English Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    simple.wikipedia.org › wiki › Achondrite

    From Simple English Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia An achondrite asteroid sample. An achondrite is a stony meteorite that is made of material similar to terrestrial basalts or plutonic rocks.

  6. Achondrite — Wikipedia Republished // WIKI 2

    wiki2.org › en › Achondrite

    An achondrite is a stony meteorite that does not contain chondrules. It consists of material similar to terrestrial basalts or plutonic rocks and has been differentiated and reprocessed to a lesser or greater degree due to melting and recrystallization on or within meteorite parent bodies. As a result, achondrites have distinct textures and mineralogies indicative of igneous processes.

  7. Category:Achondrite meteorites - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Category:Achondrite_meteorites

    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Wikimedia Commons has media related to Achondrite meteorites.

  8. Chondrite - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Chondrite
    • Overview
    • Origin and history
    • Characteristics
    • Chondrite classification
    • Composition
    • Petrologic types

    A chondrite /ˈkɒndraɪt/ is a stony meteorite that has not been modified, by either melting or differentiation of the parent body. They are formed when various types of dust and small grains in the early Solar System accreted to form primitive asteroids. Some such bodies that are captured in the planet’s gravity well become the most common type of meteorite by arriving on a trajectory toward the Earth’s surface. Estimates for their contribution to the total meteorite population vary...

    Chondrites were formed by the accretion of particles of dust and grit present in the primitive Solar System which gave rise to asteroids over 4.54 billion years ago. These asteroid parent bodies of chondrites are small to medium-sized asteroids that were never part of any body large enough to undergo melting and planetary differentiation. Dating using 206Pb/204Pb gives an estimated age of 4,566.6 ± 1.0 Ma, matching ages for other chronometers. Another indication of their age is the fact ...

    Prominent among the components present in chondrites are the enigmatic chondrules, millimetre-sized spherical objects that originated as freely floating, molten or partially molten droplets in space; most chondrules are rich in the silicate minerals olivine and pyroxene. Chondrites also contain refractory inclusions, which are among the oldest objects to form in the solar system, particles rich in metallic Fe-Ni and sulfides, and isolated grains of silicate minerals. The remainder of chondrites

    Enstatite chondrites are a rare form of meteorite thought to comprise only about 2% of the chondrites that fall to Earth. Only about 200 E-Type chondrites are currently known. The majority of enstatite chondrites have either been recovered in Antarctica or have been collected by

    Ordinary chondrites are by far the most common type of meteorite to fall to Earth: about 80% of all meteorites and over 90% of chondrites are ordinary chondrites. They contain abundant chondrules, sparse matrix, few refractory inclusions, and variable amounts of Fe-Ni metal and t

    Carbonaceous chondrites make up less than 5% of the chondrites that fall on Earth. They are characterized by the presence of carbon compounds, including amino acids. They are thought to have been formed the farthest from the sun of any of the chondrites as they have the highest p

    Because chondrites accumulated from material that formed very early in the history of the solar system, and because chondritic asteroids did not melt, they have very primitive compositions. "Primitive," in this sense, means that the abundances of most chemical elements do not differ greatly from those that are measured by spectroscopic methods in the photosphere of the sun, which in turn should be well-representative of the entire solar system.

    A chondrite's group is determined by its primary chemical, mineralogical, and isotopic characteristics. The degree to which it has been affected by the secondary processes of thermal metamorphism and aqueous alteration on the parent asteroid is indicated by its petrologic type, which appears as a number following the group name. The current scheme for describing petrologic types was devised by Van Schmus and Wood in 1967. The petrologic-type scheme originated by Van Schmus and Wood is really two

    • Small to medium asteroids that were never part of a body large enough to undergo melting and planetary differentiation.
    • Over 27,000
    • 3–6
    • Stony
  9. Achondrite — Wikipédia

    fr.wikipedia.org › wiki › Achondrite

    Achondrite est un terme utilisé en géologie et planétologie pour désigner un certain type de météorite pierreuse (moins de 35 % de métal). Cette catégorie est elle-même divisée en plusieurs sous-groupes de météorites : les achondrites primitives, et les achondrites.

  10. Diogenite - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Diogenite

    Achondrite: Structural classification: Igneous rocks of plutonic origin: Class: Asteroidal achondrite: Clan: HED: Parent body: 4 Vesta: Composition: Primarily magnesium-rich orthopyroxene, a little plagioclase & olivine: Total known specimens ~40

  11. L chondrite - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › L_chondrite

    L chondrite From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia The L type ordinary chondrites are the second most common group of meteorites, accounting for approximately 35% of all those catalogued, and 40% of the ordinary chondrites.

  12. People also search for