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  1. The articles on Wikipedia (Baltic languages, Balto-Slavic languages, Proto-Balto-Slavic language and Indo-European languages) assert the existence of Balto-Slavic and do not provide any scientific evidence for this, if you take a closer look. The biggest argument I encountered was that the majority of scholars uphold that view.

    Talk:Baltic languages - Wikipedia

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Talk:Baltic_languages
  2. Baltic languages - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Baltic_languages

    Western Baltic languages † (Western) Galindian Old Prussian Sudovian ( Yotvingian) † ? Skalvian † (unattested)

    • Latgalian

      Latgalian (latgalīšu volūda, Latvian: latgaliešu valoda) is...

    • Branches

      The Baltic languages are generally thought to form a single...

  3. Baltic languages - Simple English Wikipedia, the free ...

    simple.wikipedia.org › wiki › Baltic_languages

    Western Baltic languages † (Western) Galindian Old Prussian Sudovian ( Yotvingian) † ? Skalvian † (unattested)

    • Western Baltic †, Eastern Baltic, Dnieper Baltic †
    • Northern Europe
  4. Category:Baltic languages - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Category:Baltic_languages

    For a list of words relating to Baltic languages, see the Baltic languages category of words in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. The main article for this category is Baltic languages . Wikimedia Commons has media related to Baltic languages .

  5. Balto-Slavic languages - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Balto-Slavic_languages

    The Balto-Slavic languages are a branch of the Indo-European family of languages.It traditionally comprises the Baltic and Slavic languages.Baltic and Slavic languages share several linguistic traits not found in any other Indo-European branch, which points to a period of common development.

  6. Talk:Baltic languages - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Talk:Baltic_languages

    The articles on Wikipedia (Baltic languages, Balto-Slavic languages, Proto-Balto-Slavic language and Indo-European languages) assert the existence of Balto-Slavic and do not provide any scientific evidence for this, if you take a closer look. The biggest argument I encountered was that the majority of scholars uphold that view.

  7. Finnic languages - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Finnic_languages

    The Finnic languages are located at the western end of the Uralic language family. A close affinity to their northern neighbors, the Sami languages, has long been assumed, though many of the similarities (particularly lexical ones) can be shown to result from common influence from Germanic languages and, to a lesser extent, Baltic languages.

  8. List of Indo-European languages - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › List_of_Indo-European_languages

    The Indo-European languages include some 449 (SIL estimate, 2018 edition) language families spoken by about or more than 3.5 billion people (roughly half of the world population).

  9. Uralic languages - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Uralic_languages

    The Uralic languages (/ j ʊəˈr æ l ɪ k /; sometimes called Uralian languages / j ʊəˈr eɪ l i ə n /) form a language family of 38 languages spoken by approximately 25 million people, predominantly in Northern Eurasia.

  10. Baltic languages | Britannica

    www.britannica.com › topic › Baltic-languages

    Baltic languages, group of Indo-European languages that includes modern Latvian and Lithuanian, spoken on the eastern shores of the Baltic Sea, and the extinct Old Prussian, Yotvingian, Curonian, Selonian, and Semigallian languages. The Baltic languages are more closely related to Slavic, Germanic, and Indo-Iranian (in that order) than to the other branches of the family.

  11. Romani language - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Romani_language

    Romani (/ ˈ r ɒ m ə n i, ˈ r oʊ-/; also Romany; Romani: rromani ćhib) is an Indo-Aryan macrolanguage of the Romani communities. According to Ethnologue, seven varieties of Romani are divergent enough to be considered languages of their own.

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