Yahoo Web Search

  1. Balto-Slavic languages - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Balto-Slavic_languages

    The Balto-Slavic languages are a branch of the Indo-European family of languages.It traditionally comprises the Baltic and Slavic languages.Baltic and Slavic languages share several linguistic traits not found in any other Indo-European branch, which points to a period of common development.

  2. List of Balto-Slavic languages - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › List_of_Balto-Slavic_languages

    These are the Balto-Slavic languages categorized by sub-groups, including number of speakers. Baltic languages. Latvian, 1.75 million speakers (2015) Latgalian ...

  3. Balto-Slavic languages - Simple English Wikipedia, the free ...

    simple.wikipedia.org › wiki › Balto-Slavic_languages

    Balto-Slavic languages From Simple English Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia The Balto-Slavic language group is made up of the Baltic and Slavic languages. They are part of a large family group because they share many similarities involving the linguistic traits of the two language families that can not be found in other languages.

  4. List of Balto-Slavic languages - Simple English Wikipedia ...

    simple.wikipedia.org › wiki › List_of_Balto-Slavic

    List of Balto-Slavic languages From Simple English Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia There are many Balto-Slavic languages. Some are now extinct and some are still spoken today.

  5. Proto-Balto-Slavic language - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Proto-Balto-Slavic_language

    Proto-Balto-Slavic (PBS) is a reconstructed proto-language descending from Proto-Indo-European (PIE). From Proto-Balto-Slavic, the later Balto-Slavic languages are thought to have developed, composed of sub-branches Baltic and Slavic, and including modern Lithuanian, Polish, Russian and Serbo-Croatian among others.

  6. Baltic languages - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Western_Baltic_languages

    The Baltic languages show a close relationship with the Slavic languages, and are grouped with them in a Balto-Slavic family by most scholars. This family is considered to have developed from a common ancestor, Proto-Balto-Slavic. Later on, several lexical, phonological and morphological dialectisms developed, separating the various Balto ...

    • Western Baltic †, Eastern Baltic, Dnieper Baltic †
    • Northern Europe
  7. West Slavic languages - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › West_Slavic_languages

    The West Slavic languages are a subdivision of the Slavic language group.They include Polish, Czech, Slovak, Kashubian, Upper Sorbian and Lower Sorbian.The languages are spoken across a continuous region encompassing the Czech Republic, Slovakia and Poland as well as the former East Germany and the westernmost regions of Ukraine and Belarus (and into Lithuania

  8. Balto-Slavic languages — Wikipedia Republished // WIKI 2

    wiki2.org › en › Balto-Slavic_languages

    Jan 30, 2021 · The Balto-Slavic languages are a branch of the Indo-European family of languages. It traditionally comprises the Baltic and Slavic languages. Baltic and Slavic languages share several linguistic traits not found in any other Indo-European branch, which points to a period of common development. Although the notion of a Balto-Slavic unity has been contested (partly due to political controversies ...

  9. South Slavic languages - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › South_Slavic_languages

    The Slavic languages are part of the Balto-Slavic group, which belongs to the Indo-European language family. The South Slavic languages have been considered a genetic node in Slavic studies : defined by a set of phonological, morphological and lexical innovations (isoglosses) which separate it from the Western and Eastern Slavic groups.

  10. People also search for
  1. Ad
    related to: Balto-Slavic languages wikipedia