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  1. Deadweight loss - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deadweight_loss

    Deadweight loss, also known as excess burden, is a measure of lost economic efficiency when the socially optimal quantity of a good or a service is not produced. Non-optimal production be caused by monopoly pricing in the case of artificial scarcity, a positive or negative externality, a tax or subsidy, or a binding price ceiling or price floor ...

  2. Excess burden of taxation - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deadweight_loss_of_taxation

    In economics, the excess burden of taxation, also known as the deadweight cost or deadweight loss of taxation, is one of the economic losses that society suffers as the result of taxes or subsidies. Economic theory posits that distortions change the amount and type of economic behavior from that which would occur in a free market without the tax.

  3. Deadweight Loss Definition - Investopedia

    www.investopedia.com/terms/d/deadweightloss.asp

    Sep 24, 2019 · A deadweight loss is a cost to society created by market inefficiency, which occurs when supply and demand are out of equilibrium. Mainly used in economics, deadweight loss can be applied to any ...

  4. deadweight loss - Wiktionary

    en.wiktionary.org/wiki/deadweight_loss

    deadweight loss (plural deadweight losses) ( economics ) A loss of economic efficiency due to failure to achieve a free market equilibrium. Translations [ edit ]

  5. A deadweight loss, also known as excess burden or allocative inefficiency, is a loss of economic efficiency that can occur when equilibrium for a good or a service is not achieved. That can be caused by monopoly pricing in the case of artificial scarcity, an externality, a tax or subsidy, or a binding price ceiling or price floor such as a minimum wage.

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  7. Deadweight - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deadweight

    Deadweight loss, a loss of economic efficiency that can occur when equilibrium for a good or service is not Pareto optimal; Deadweight tonnage, a ship's carrying capacity, which includes cargo, fuel, crew, etc. Dead weight or dressed weight, the weight of an animal carcass after removal of skin, head, feet, visceral organs, etc.

  8. Deadweight tonnage - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deadweight_tonnage

    Definition. Deadweight tonnage is a measure of a vessel's weight carrying capacity, not including the empty weight of the ship. It is distinct from the displacement (weight of water displaced), which includes the ship's own weight, or other volume or capacity measures such as gross tonnage or net tonnage (or their more archaic forms gross register tonnage or net register tonnage).

  9. What is Deadweight Loss? Definition of Deadweight Loss ...

    economictimes.indiatimes.com/.../deadweight-loss

    Description: Deadweight loss can be stated as the loss of total welfare or the social surplus due to reasons like taxes or subsidies, price ceilings or floors, externalities and monopoly pricing. It is the excess burden created due to loss of benefit to the participants in trade which are individuals as consumers, producers or the government.

  10. Mar 16, 2020 · Deadweight loss, also known as excess burden, is a measure of lost economic efficiency when the socially optimal quantity of a good or a service is not produced. Non-optimal production can be caused by monopoly pricing in the case of artificial scarcity, a positive or negative externality, a tax or

  11. File:Deadweight-loss-price-ceiling.svg - Wikimedia Commons

    commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Deadweight-loss...

    Nov 28, 2006 · All following user names refer to en.wikipedia. 2006-11-28 12:16 SilverStar 350×350× (13226 bytes) Better annotated version. 2006-11-28 12:06 SilverStar 350×350× (12488 bytes) Illustration of [[deadweight loss]] introduced by a (binding) [[price ceiling]].