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  1. Dietary Reference Intake - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dietary_Reference_Intake

    The Dietary Reference Intake (DRI) is a system of nutrition recommendations from the Institute of Medicine (IOM) of the National Academies (United States). It was introduced in 1997 in order to broaden the existing guidelines known as Recommended Dietary Allowances (RDAs, see below).

  2. Reference Daily Intake - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reference_Daily_Intake

    The Reference Daily Intake (RDI) used in nutrition labeling on food and dietary supplement products in the U.S. and Canada is the daily intake level of a nutrient that is considered to be sufficient to meet the requirements of 97–98% of healthy individuals in every demographic in the United States.

  3. The Dietary Reference Intake (DRI) is a system of nutrition recommendations from the Institute of Medicine (IOM) of the National Academies (United States). It was introduced in 1997 in order to broaden the existing guidelines known as Recommended Dietary Allowances (RDAs, see below). The DRI values differ from those used in nutrition labeling on food and dietary supplement products in the U.S ...

  4. Dietary Reference Intake - WikiMili, The Best Wikipedia Reader

    wikimili.com/en/Dietary_Reference_Intake

    The Dietary Reference Intake (DRI) is a system of nutrition recommendations from the Institute of Medicine (IOM) of the National Academies (United States). It was introduced in 1997 in order to broaden the existing guidelines known as Recommended Dietary Allowances (RDAs, see below).

  5. Dietary Reference Intake

    ztkjtyuk.blogspot.com/2018/09/dietary-reference...

    The Dietary Reference Intake (DRI) is a system of nutrition recommendations from the Institute of Medicine (IOM) of the National Academies (United States). [1] It was introduced in 1997 in order to broaden the existing guidelines known as Recommended Dietary Allowances (RDAs, see below).

  6. Dietary Reference Values - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dietary_Reference_Values

    The Dietary Reference Values below are specified mainly for adults. They define the proportion of a person's total energy intake which should come from different components of food. These include fat and fatty acids, fibre, starch and sugars.

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  8. Dietary Reference Intakes | Food and Nutrition Information ...

    www.nal.usda.gov/fnic/dietary-reference-intakes

    The Dietary Reference Intakes (DRIs) are developed and published by the Institute of Medicine (IOM). The DRIs represent the most current scientific knowledge on nutrient needs of healthy populations. Please note that individual requirements may be higher or lower than the DRIs.

  9. Nutrient Recommendations : Dietary Reference Intakes (DRI)

    ods.od.nih.gov/.../Dietary_Reference_Intakes.aspx

    These documents are issued by the Food and Nutrition Board of the Institute of Medicine, National Academy of Sciences.The Food and Nutrition Board addresses issues of safety, quality, and adequacy of the food supply; establishes principles and guidelines of adequate dietary intake; and renders authoritative judgments on the relationships among food intake, nutrition, and health.

  10. What Are Dietary Reference Values (DRVs)?: (EUFIC)

    www.eufic.org/en/understanding-science/article/...
    • Deriving Drvs
    • European Drvs
    • Applying Drvs
    • References

    DRVs are quantitative reference values for nutritional intakes derived for different population groups, based on health criteria. They guide professionals on the estimated quantities of energy and nutrients needed to support adequate growth, development and health, while reducing the risk of deficiencies and non-communicable diseases such as heart disease or cancer.1 In defining nutrient adequacy, a range of criteria is considered. For most nutrients a hierarchy can be established – ranging f...

    The European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) published updated DRVs for fats, carbohydrates (including sugars and fibre), and water in 2010, protein in 2012, energy in 2013, while those for micronutrients are in progress.1-3 EFSA also produced guiding principles for deriving and applying DRVs, which include acceptable types of studies, methods for determining (and factors influencing) nutrient requirements, and how diet influences chronic disease risks.1 The EU project EURRECA (EURopean micronut...

    DRVs can be used in policy making, healthcare, the food industry, and academic research. They can be used for dietary assessment, planning diets, and developing dietary recommendations for individuals or groups, and for food labelling.

    1. EFSA (2010). Scientific Opinion on principles for deriving and applying Dietary Reference Values. EFSA Journal 8(3):1458. http://www.efsa.europa.eu/en/efsajournal/doc/1458.pdf 2. EFSA (2013). Scientific Opinion on Dietary Reference Values for energy. EFSA Journal 11(1):3005. http://www.efsa.europa.eu/en/efsajournal/doc/3005.pdf 3. EU project EURRECA, www.eurreca.org 4. EFSA (2010). Scientific Opinion on establishing Food-Based Dietary Guidelines. EFSA Journal 8(3):1460. http://www.efsa.eu...

  11. Appendix 2. Estimated Calorie Needs per Day, by Age, Sex, and ...

    health.gov/our-work/food-nutrition/2015-2020...

    The reference woman is 5 feet 4 inches tall and weighs 126 pounds. Estimates range from 1,600 to 2,400 calories per day for adult women and 2,000 to 3,000 calories per day for adult men. Within each age and sex category, the low end of the range is for sedentary individuals; the high end of the range is for active individuals.