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      • Elasticity (economics) In economics, people talk about elasticity of an economic variable, usually supply or demand, in relation to another economic variable such as income or price. The elasticity of a variable is a measure of how much the variable changes in response to a change in a second variable.
      simple.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elasticity_(economics)
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  2. Elasticity (economics) - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elasticity_(economics)

    In economics, elasticity is the measurement of the percentage change of one economic variable in response to a change in another. An elastic variable (with an absolute elasticity value greater than 1) is one which responds more than proportionally to changes in other variables.

    • Variants

      In some cases the discrete arc elasticity is used instead....

  3. Elasticity - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elasticity

    Elasticity (physics), continuum mechanics of bodies that deform reversibly under stress. Numerous uses are derived from this physical sense of the term, which is inherently mathematical, such as used in Engineering, Chemistry, Construction and variously in Economics. 1 Information Technology. Information Technology.

  4. Elasticity (economics) - Simple English Wikipedia, the free ...

    simple.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elasticity_(economics)

    In economics, people talk about elasticity of an economic variable, usually supply or demand, in relation to another economic variable such as income or price. The elasticity of a variable is a measure of how much the variable changes in response to a change in a second variable.

  5. Elasticity of a function - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Semi-elasticity

    The elasticity at a point is the limit of the arc elasticity between two points as the separation between those two points approaches zero. The concept of elasticity is widely used in economics; see elasticity (economics) for details.

  6. Category:Elasticity (economics) - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/.../Category:Elasticity_(economics)

    Elasticity (economics) is included in the JEL classification codes as JEL: D01 Pages in category "Elasticity (economics)" The following 17 pages are in this category, out of 17 total.

  7. Elasticity is one of the most important concepts in neoclassical economic theory. It is useful in understanding the incidence of indirect taxation , marginal concepts as they relate to the theory of the firm , and distribution of wealth and different types of goods as they relate to the theory of consumer choice .

  8. Wikipedia

    www.wikipedia.org/?title=Elasticity (economics)

    Save your favorite articles to read offline, sync your reading lists across devices and customize your reading experience with the official Wikipedia app. Commons Freely usable photos & more Wikivoyage Free travel guide Wiktionary Free dictionary Wikibooks Free textbooks Wikinews Free news source Wikidata Free knowledge base Wikiversity Free course materials Wikiquote Free quote compendium ...

  9. Elasticity (physics) - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elasticity_(physics)

    In physics, elasticity (from Greek ἐλαστός "ductible") is the ability of a body to resist a distorting influence and to return to its original size and shape when that influence or force is removed. Solid objects will deform when adequate forces are applied to them.

  10. Price elasticity of demand - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Price_elasticity_of_demand

    Together with the concept of an economic "elasticity" coefficient, Alfred Marshall is credited with defining "elasticity of demand" in Principles of Economics, published in 1890. Alfred Marshall invented price elasticity of demand only four years after he had invented the concept of elasticity.

  11. Economics - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Economics

    Economics (/ ɛ k ə ˈ n ɒ m ɪ k s, iː k ə-/) is the social science that studies the production, distribution, and consumption of goods and services.. Economics focuses on the behaviour and interactions of economic agents and how economies work.