Yahoo Web Search

  1. Judaism - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Judaism

    Judaism (originally from Hebrew יהודה ‎, Yehudah, "Judah"; via Latin and Greek) is an ethnic religion comprising the collective religious, cultural and legal tradition and civilization of the Jewish people. Judaism is considered by religious Jews to be the expression of the covenant that God established with the Children of Israel.

  2. Jews - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jews

    Jews (Hebrew: יְהוּדִים ‎ ISO 259-2 Yehudim, Israeli pronunciation) or Jewish people are an ethnoreligious group and a nation originating from the Israelites and Hebrews of historical Israel and Judah.

  3. Orthodox Jews do not believe that Reform or Conservative Judaism are correct because they believe that the laws given by God are timeless, and can't be changed. In the most recent survey of Jews in the United States in 2000-2001, it was found that 35% of American Jews say they are Reform, 27% say they are Conservative, 10% say they are Orthodox ...

  4. Christianity and Judaism - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christianity_and_Judaism

    Christianity is rooted in Second Temple Judaism, but the two religions diverged in the first centuries of the Christian Era.Christianity emphasizes correct belief (or orthodoxy), focusing on the New Covenant as mediated through Jesus Christ, as recorded in the New Testament.

  5. Jewish history - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jewish_history

    Jewish history is the history of the Jews, and their nation, religion and culture, as it developed and interacted with other peoples, religions and cultures.Although Judaism as a religion first appears in Greek records during the Hellenistic period (323–31 BCE) and the earliest mention of Israel is inscribed on the Merneptah Stele dated 1213–1203 BCE, religious literature tells the story ...

  6. Reform Judaism - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reform_Judaism

    Reform Judaism (also known as Liberal Judaism or Progressive Judaism) is a major Jewish denomination that emphasizes the evolving nature of the faith, the superiority of its ethical aspects to the ceremonial ones, and belief in a continuous revelation, closely intertwined with human reason and intellect, and not centered on the theophany at Mount Sinai.

  7. Orthodox Judaism - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orthodox_Judaism

    Orthodox Judaism is the traditionalist branches of contemporary Rabbinic Judaism. Theologically, it is chiefly defined by regarding the Torah, both Written and Oral, as literally revealed by God to Moses on Mount Sinai and faithfully transmitted down through the generations of sages ever since.

  8. Messiah in Judaism - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Messiah_in_Judaism

    Many Jews (see the Bartenura's explanation on Megillat Rut, and the Halakhic responsa of The Ch'sam Sofer on Choshen Mishpat [vol. 6], Chapter 98 where this view is explicit), especially Hasidim, adhere to the belief that there is a person born each generation with the potential to become Messiah, if the Jewish people warrant his coming; this ...

  9. Hinduism and Judaism - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hinduism_and_Judaism

    Judaism, notable for its monotheistic conception of God, has some similarities with those Hindu scriptures that are monotheistic, such as the Vedas. In Judaism God is transcendent, while in Hinduism God is both immanent and transcendent.

  10. Hasidic Judaism - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hasidic_Judaism

    Hasidism, sometimes spelled Chassidism, and also known as Hasidic Judaism (Hebrew: חסידות ‎, romanized: Ḥăsīdut, ; originally, "piety"), is a Jewish religious group that arose as a spiritual revival movement in the territory of contemporary Western Ukraine during the 18th century, and spread rapidly throughout Eastern Europe.