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  1. Kingdom of Israel (united monarchy) - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Kingdom_of_Israel_(united

    The United Monarchy ( Hebrew: הממלכה המאוחדת ‎) is the name given to the Israelite kingdom of Israel and Judah, during the reigns of Saul, David and Solomon, as depicted in the Hebrew Bible. This is traditionally dated between 1047 BCE and 930 BCE. On the succession of Solomon's son, Rehoboam, around 930 BCE, the Biblical account ...

  2. Category:Kingdom of Israel (united monarchy) - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Category:Kingdom_of_Israel

    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Articles relating to the Kingdom of Israel (united monarchy) (c. 1050-930 BCE).

  3. Kingdom of Israel (united monarchy) — Wikipedia Republished ...

    wiki2.org › en › Kingdom_of_Israel_(united_monarchy)
    • Sources
    • Archaeological Record
    • Biblical Narrative
    • Biblical Chronology
    • See Also

    Ac­cord­ing to stan­dard source crit­i­cism, a num­ber of dis­tinct source texts were spliced to­gether to pro­duce the cur­rent Books of Samuel. The most promi­nent in the early parts of the first book are the pro-monar­chi­cal source and the anti-monar­chi­cal source. In iden­ti­fy­ing these two sources, two sep­a­rate ac­counts can be re­con­structed. The anti-monar­chi­cal source de­scribes Samuel as hav­ing thor­oughly routed the Philistines, yet be­grudg­ingly ac­cept­ing the peo­ple's de­mand for a ruler, sub­se­quently ap­point­ing Saul by clero­mancy.[citation needed] The pro-monar­chi­cal source de­scribes the di­vinely ap­pointed birth of Saul (a sin­gle word being changed by a later ed­i­tor so that it re­ferred to Samuel in­stead), and his lead­ing of an army to vic­tory over the Am­monites, re­sulted in the clam­our­ing of the peo­ple for him to lead them against the Philistines, where­upon he is ap­pointed king. Tex­tual crit­ics also point to dis­par­i­ties in the ac...

    Ac­cord­ing to Is­rael Finkel­stein and Neil Sil­ber­man, au­thors of The Bible Un­earthed, ideas of a united monar­chy are not ac­cu­rate his­tory but rather "cre­ative ex­pres­sions of a pow­er­ful re­li­gious re­form move­ment," pos­si­bly "based on cer­tain his­tor­i­cal kernels." Finkel­stein and Sil­ber­man do ac­cept that David and Solomon were real kings of Judah about the 10th cen­tury BCE, but they cite the fact that the ear­li­est in­de­pen­dent ref­er­ence to the King­dom of Is­rael dates to about 890 BCE, while that for the king­dom of Judah dates to about 750 BCE. This is sup­ported by Jonathan Tubb, who ar­gues that the story of the united monar­chy was fab­ri­cated as a Golden Age tale dur­ing the Exile. He ac­cepts the his­toric­ity of David and Solomon but cau­tions that "[t]hey must be seen . . . as local folk he­roes and not as rulers of in­ter­na­tional status." Oded Lip­s­chits wrote in the Jew­ish Study Biblethat "the pre­monar­chic pe­riod long ago be­came a...

    Origin

    Ac­cord­ing to the Book of Judges, be­fore the rise of the united monar­chy the Is­raelite tribes lived as a con­fed­er­a­tion under ad hoc charis­matic lead­ers called judges. Abim­elech the first judge to be de­clared king by the men of Shechem and the house of Millo (Bet Millo), reigned over Is­rael for three years be­fore he was killed dur­ing the Bat­tle of The­bez. Ac­cord­ing to the bib­li­cal ac­count, the united monar­chy was formed when there was a large pop­u­lar ex­pres­sion in fa...

    Civil war

    David and Saul be­come bit­ter en­e­mies, at least from Saul's point of view, al­though sources de­scribe Jonathan, Saul's son, and Michal, Saul's daugh­ter, as as­sist­ing David to es­cape Saul, ul­ti­mately lead­ing to a brief rec­on­cil­i­a­tion be­fore Saul's death.[citation needed] Ac­cord­ing to the Sec­ond Book of Samuel, Saul's dis­obe­di­ence prompts God to cur­tail his reign and hand his king­dom over to an­other dy­nasty. Saul dies in bat­tle against the Philistines[citation needed...

    Golden Age

    Prior to the as­cen­sion of Saul, the city of Shiloh is seen as the na­tional cap­i­tal, at least in the re­li­gious sense, a claim that from an ar­chae­o­log­i­cal stand­point is con­sid­ered plau­si­ble. Through­out the monar­chy of Saul, the cap­i­tal is lo­cated in Gibeah. After Saul's death, Ish­baal rules over the king­dom of Is­rael from Ma­hanaim, while David es­tab­lishes the cap­i­tal of the king­dom of Judah in He­bron.[citation needed] Fol­low­ing the civil war with Saul, David fo...

    Many al­ter­na­tive chronolo­gies have been sug­gested, and there is no ul­ti­mate con­sen­sus be­tween the dif­fer­ent fac­tions and schol­arly dis­ci­plines con­cerned with this pe­riod, as to when it is de­picted as hav­ing begun or when it ended. Most bibi­cal schol­ars fol­low ei­ther of the older chronolo­gies es­tab­lished by William F. Al­bright or Edwin R. Thiele, or the newer chronol­ogy of Ger­shon Galil, all of which are shown below. All dates are BCE. Thiele's chronol­ogy gen­er­ally cor­re­sponds with Galil's chronol­ogy below with a dif­fer­ence of at most one year.

  4. Talk:Kingdom of Israel (united monarchy) - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Talk:Kingdom_of_Israel

    However, historians and archeologists distinguish between the Kingdom of Israel in the United Monarchy period and the Kingdom of Israel in the Divided Monarchy period. Speaking of the "United Monarchy" in the context of Levantine history means precisely the Kingdom of Israel under Saul, David, and Solomon. There is no other entity that could or would be mistakenly referred to by this term.

  5. Kingdom of Israel (united monarchy) | Religion Wiki | Fandom

    religion.wikia.org › wiki › Kingdom_of_Israel
    • Biblical Account
    • Evidence
    • See Also
    • External Links

    Monarchs and Biblical chronology

    There were four rulers of the United Monarchy – Saul ben Kish (from the tribe of Benjamin), Ishbaal (name sometimes written as Ishboseth due to religious prejudices), a son of Saul, David, son-in-law of Saul through his marriage to Michal and from the tribe of Judah, and Solomon, son of David and Bathsheba. King David established Jerusalem as Israel's national capital; before then, Hebron had been the capital of David's Judah and Mahanaim of Ishbaal's Israel, and before that Gibeah had been t...

    Origins of the United Monarchy

    According to the biblical account, the United Monarchy was formed when there was a large popular expression in favour of introducing a monarchy to rule over the previously decentralised Israelite tribal confederacy. Increasing pressure from the Philistines and other neighboring tribes is said by the Bible to have forced the Israelites to unite as a more singular state. The bible treats the notion of kingship as having been an anathema at the time, it being seen as one man put in a position of...

    Civil war

    According to the first book of Samuel, due to his disobedience to God, Saul's reign was curtailed and his kingdom given to another dynasty. The Masoretic Textreads that Saul ruled for only two years, although some early manuscripts read forty-two years (cf. the New Testament, which gives him a reign of forty years). The bible portrays Saul as having died in battle against the Philistines. David and Saul had earlier become bitter enemies, at least from Saul's point of view, though the sources...

    According to textual critics, a number of distinct source texts were spliced together to produce the current books of Samuel. The most prominent in the early parts of the first book are the pro-monarchical source and the anti-monarchical source. In identifying these two sources, two separate accounts can be reconstructed. The anti-monarchical source describes Samuel (thought by a number of scholars to be a cipher for God himself) to have thoroughly routed the Philistines, yet begrudgingly accepting that the people demanded a ruler, and thus appointing Saul by cleromancy. The pro-monarchical source describes the divine birth of Saul (a single word being changed by a later editor so that it referred to Samuel instead), and his later leading of an army to victory over the Ammonites, which resulted in the people clamouring for him to lead them against the Philistines, whereupon he is appointed king. According to Israel Finkelstein and Neil Silberman, authors of The Bible Unearthed: Arch...

  6. Kingdom of Israel (united monarchy) wiki | TheReaderWiki

    thereaderwiki.com › en › United_Monarchy
    • Historical Sources
    • Archaeological Record
    • Biblical Narrative
    • Biblical Chronology
    • See Also

    According to standard source criticism, several distinct source texts were spliced together to produce the current Books of Samuel. The most prominent in the early parts of the first book are the pro-monarchical source and the anti-monarchical source. In identifying both sources, two separate accounts can be reconstructed. The anti-monarchical source describes Samuel as having thoroughly routed the Philistines, begrudgingly accepting the people's demand for a ruler and appointing Saul by cleromancy.[citation needed] The pro-monarchical source describes the divinely-appointed birth of Saul (a single word being changed by a later editor so that it referred to Samuel) and his leading of an army to victory over the Ammonites, which resulted in the clamouring of the people for him to lead them against the Philistines, when he is appointed king. Several scholars believe the Books of Samuel exhibit too many anachronisms to have been a contemporary account. For example, there is mention of...

    In 1995 and 1996, Israel Finkelstein (Tel Aviv University) published two papers where he proposed a Low Chronology for the stratigraphy of Iron Age Israel. Finkelstein's model would push stratigraphic dates assigned by the conventional chronology by up to a century later, and consequently, Finkelstein concluded that much of the monumental architecture characterizing Israel in the 10th century BCE that has been traditionally associated with the biblical United Monarchy instead belongs to the 9th century. Finkelstein wrote that "Accepting the Low Chronology means stripping the United Monarchy of monumental buildings, including ashlar masonry and proto-Ionic capitals" According to Israel Finkelstein and Neil Silberman, the authors of The Bible Unearthed, ideas of a united monarchy are not accurate history but "creative expressions of a powerful religious reform movement" that are possibly "based on certain historical kernels." Finkelstein and Silberman accept that David and Solomon wer...

    Origin

    According to the Book of Judges, before the rise of the united monarchy the Israelite tribes lived as a confederation under ad hoc charismatic leaders, called judges. Abimelech, the first judge to be declared king by the men of Shechem and the house of Millo (Bet Millo), reigned over Israel for three years until he was killed during the Battle of Thebez.[citation needed] According to the biblical account, the united monarchy was formed by a large popular expression in favour of introducing a...

    Civil war

    David and Saul become bitter enemies, at least from Saul's point of view, but sources describe Jonathan, Saul's son, and Michal, Saul's daughter and David's first wife, as assisting David to escape Saul, which ultimately leads to a brief reconciliation before Saul's death.[citation needed] According to the Second Book of Samuel, Saul's disobedience prompts God to curtail his reign and to hand his kingdom over to another dynasty. Saul dies in battle against the Philistines[citation needed] aft...

    Golden Age

    Prior to the ascension of Saul, the city of Shiloh is seen as the national capital, at least in the religious sense. From an archaeological standpoint, the claim is considered to be plausible. Throughout the monarchy of Saul, the capital is in Gibeah. After Saul's death, Ishbaal rules over the Kingdom of Israel from Mahanaim, and David establishes the capital of the Kingdom of Judah in Hebron.[citation needed] After the civil war with Saul, David forges a strong and unified Israelite monarchy...

    Many alternative chronologies have been suggested, and there is no ultimate consensus between the different factions and scholarly disciplines concerned with the period as to when it is depicted as having begun or when it ended. Most biblical scholars follow either of the older chronologies established by William F. Albright or Edwin R. Thiele or the newer chronology of Gershon Galil, all of which are shown below. All dates are BCE. Thiele's chronology generally corresponds with Galil's chronology below with a difference of at most one year.

  7. Davidic line - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Davidic_line

    The Davidic line or House of David (known in Hebrew as מלכות בית דוד ‎ Malkhut Bayt David - "Kingdom of the House of David") refers to the lineage of King David through the texts in the Hebrew Bible, in the New Testament, and through the succeeding centuries. It is the bloodline that the Hebrew Messiah is said to have a patrilineal ...

  8. Kingdom of Israel (united monarchy) - WikiMili, The Best ...

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    Mar 11, 2021 · ) (Arabic: الملكية المتحدة) Are the name's given to the Israelite [lower-alpha 1] kingdom of Israel and Judah, during the reigns of Saul, David and Solomon, as depicted in the Hebrew Bible. This is traditionally dated between 1047 BCE and 930 BCE.

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  10. Kingdom of Israel (united monarchy) and similar former ...

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    Former countries similar to or like Kingdom of Israel (united monarchy) Name given to the Israelite kingdom of Israel and Judah, during the reigns of Saul, David and Solomon, as depicted in the Hebrew Bible.

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