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  1. Phrygian language - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Phrygian_language

    The Phrygian language (/ ˈ f r ɪ dʒ i ə n /) was the Indo-European language of the Phrygians, spoken in Anatolia (modern Turkey), during classical antiquity (c. 8th century BC to 5th century AD). Plato observed that some Phrygian words resembled Greek ones. [4]

  2. Phrygia - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Phrygia

    Phrygian language Phrygian continued to be spoken until the 6th century AD, though its distinctive alphabet was lost earlier than those of most Anatolian cultures. [2] One of the Homeric Hymns describes the Phrygian language as not mutually intelligible with that of Troy , [6] and inscriptions found at Gordium make clear that Phrygians spoke an ...

    • Dominant kingdom in Asia Minor from c. 1200–700 BC
    • Phrygian
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    What does Phrygian language mean?

    Is the Phrygian language part of the centum group?

    Which is the closest relative of the Phrygian language?

    Which is closer to Greek , Armenian or Phrygian?

  4. Armeno-Phrygian languages - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Armeno-Phrygian_languages

    The name Armeno-Phrygian is used for a hypothetical language branch, which would include the languages spoken by the Phrygians and the Armenians, and would be a branch of the Indo-European language family, or a sub-branch of either the proposed "Graeco-Armeno-Aryan" or "Armeno-Aryan" branches.

  5. Talk:Phrygian language - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Talk:Phrygian_language

    Phrygian is an Indo-European language and even though we have limited vocabulary about it, it is perfect for demonstrating its relation with other IE languages.Fkitselis 21:12, 1 March 2012 (UTC) External links modified. Hello fellow Wikipedians, I have just modified one external link on Phrygian language.

  6. Phrygian - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Phrygian

    Phrygian can refer to: Anything relating to the region of Phrygia; Anything relating to the Phrygians, an ethnic group; Phrygian language, their language; Phrygian cap, once characteristic of the region; Phrygian mode in music; A follower of Montanism, an early Christian movement in Phrygia

  7. Graeco-Phrygian - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Graeco-Phrygian

    Graeco-Phrygian (/ ˌ ɡ r iː k oʊ ˈ f r ɪ dʒ i ən /) is a proposed subgroup of the Indo-European language family which comprises Hellenic and Phrygian languages.

  8. Phrygian mode - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Phrygian_mode

    The Phrygian mode (pronounced / ˈ f r ɪ dʒ i ə n /) can refer to three different musical modes: the ancient Greek tonos or harmonia sometimes called Phrygian, formed on a particular set of octave species or scales; the Medieval Phrygian mode, and the modern conception of the Phrygian mode as a diatonic scale, based on the latter.

  9. Armeno-Phrygians - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Armeno-Phrygian

    The term "Armeno-Phrygian" is also used for a hypothetical language branch, which would include the languages spoken by the Phrygians and the Armenians, and would be a branch of the Indo-European language family, or a sub-branch of either the proposed "Graeco-Armeno-Aryan" or "Armeno-Aryan" branches.

  10. Thracian language - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Thracian_language

    The Thracian language (/ ˈ θ r eɪ ʃ ən /) is an extinct and poorly attested language, spoken in ancient times in Southeast Europe by the Thracians. The linguistic affinities of the Thracian language are poorly understood , but it is generally agreed that it was an Indo-European language with satem features.

    Thracian place
    Lithuanian place
    Latvian place
    Old Prussian place
    Gesia
    Kapisturia
    Lingos
    Lingė, Lingenai
    Lingas, Lingi, Lingasdikis
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