Yahoo Web Search

  1. Supply shock - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Supply_shock

    A supply shock is an event that suddenly increases or decreases the supply of a commodity or service, or of commodities and services in general. This sudden change affects the equilibrium price of the good or service or the economy's general price level.

  2. A supply shock is an event that suddenly increases or decreases the supply of a commodity or service, or of commodities and services in general. This sudden change affects the equilibrium price of the good or service or the economy's general price level.

  3. Shock (circulatory) - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shock_(circulatory)

    Shock is the state of insufficient blood flow to the tissues of the body as a result of problems with the circulatory system. Initial symptoms of shock may include weakness, fast heart rate, fast breathing, sweating, anxiety, and increased thirst. This may be followed by confusion, unconsciousness, or cardiac arrest, as complications worsen.

  4. People also ask

    What is a supply shock?

    What is supply shock in economics?

    What is productivity shock?

    What is the difference between supply shock and negative shock?

  5. Supply shock - Market

    market.subwiki.org/wiki/Supply_shock

    Positive supply shock: A sudden increase in the supply at every price. In other words, a sudden rightward shift of the supply curve. A positive supply shock leads to a sudden excess supply of the commodity, which, if the market is fast to respond, leads to a reduction in price and an increase in the quantity traded.

  6. Shock (economics) - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shock_(economics)

    If the shock is due to constrained supply, it is called a supply shock and usually results in price increases for a particular product. A technology shock is the kind resulting from a technological development that affects productivity. Supply shocks can also be produced when accidents or disasters occur.

  7. Cost-push inflation - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cost-push_inflation

    Some economists argue that such a change in the price level can raise the inflation rate over longer periods, due to adaptive expectations and the price/wage spiral, so that a supply shock can have persistent effects.

  8. Demand shock - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Demand_shock

    To counter this negative demand shock, the Federal Reserve System lowered interest rates. Before the crisis occurred, the world's economy experienced a positive global supply shock . Immediately afterward, however, a positive global demand shock led to global overheating and rising inflationary pressures.

  9. Supply Shock Definition - Investopedia

    www.investopedia.com/terms/s/supplyshock.asp

    A supply shock is an unexpected event that suddenly changes the supply of a product or commodity, resulting in an unforeseen change in price. Supply shocks can be negative, resulting in a decreased...

  10. Supply-side economics - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Supply-side_economics

    Supply-side economics is a macroeconomic theory arguing that economic growth can be most effectively created by lowering taxes and decreasing regulation, by which it is directly opposed to demand-side economics. According to supply-side economics, consumers will then benefit from a greater supply of goods and services at lower prices and ...

  11. Keynesian economics - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Keynesian_economics

    Keynesian economics (/ ˈ k eɪ n z i ə n / KAYN-zee-ən; sometimes Keynesianism, named for the economist John Maynard Keynes) are various macroeconomic theories about how in the short run – and especially during recessions – economic output is strongly influenced by aggregate demand (total spending in the economy).