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  1. Truck classification - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Truck_classification

    The Class 8 truck gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) is a vehicle with a GVWR exceeding 33 000 lb (14 969 kg). These include tractor trailer tractors, single-unit dump trucks of a GVWR over 33,000 lb, as well as non-commercial chassis fire trucks; such trucks typically have 3 or more axles.

  2. Category:Class 6 truck - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Category:Class_6_truck

    A class 6 truck is a medium-duty truck as classified by the Department of Transportation's Federal Highway Administration. Pages in category "Class 6 truck" The following 8 pages are in this category, out of 8 total.

  3. Commercial vehicle - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Commercial_vehicles

    Class 6 – GVWR ranges from 19,501 to 26,000 pounds (8,846 to 11,793 kg) Class 7 – GVWR ranges from 26,001 to 33,000 pounds (11,794 to 14,969 kg) Class 8 – GVWR is anything above 33,000 pounds (14,969 kg) Examples of commercial vehicles. Truck. Box truck (also known as a straight truck) Semi-trailer truck (articulated lorry) Van; Bus ...

  4. Commercial driver's license - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Commercial_driver&

    Class 2 (light goods vehicles) and class 18 (medium goods vehicles) licences are issued in addition to class 19 after passing the test. 20 (Articulated vehicle) — Usually refers to vehicle in the form of truck and trailer combination (hence articulated, but not include tow vehicle), total weight between 38 and 44 tonnes (37 and 43 long tons ...

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    What are the classes of trucks?

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  6. Ford F-Series - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Ford_F150
    • First Generation
    • Second Generation
    • Third Generation
    • Fourth Generation
    • Fifth Generation
    • Sixth Generation
    • Seventh Generation
    • Eighth Generation
    • Ninth Generation
    • Tenth Generation

    The first-generation F-Series pickup (known as the Ford Bonus-Built) was introduced in 1948 as a replacement for the previous car-based pickup line introduced in 1942. The F-Series was sold in eight different weight ratings, with pickup, panel truck, cab-over engine (COE), conventional truck, and school bus chassis body styles.

    For the 1953 model year, Ford introduced a second generation of the F-Series trucks. Increased dimensions, improved engines, and an updated chassis were features of the second generation. In another change, the model nomenclature of the F-Series was expanded to three numbers; this remains in use in the present day. The half-ton F-1 became the F-100 (partially influenced by the North American F-100 Super Sabre)[citation needed]; the F-2 and F-3 were combined into the 3⁄4-ton F-250 while the F-4 became the one-ton F-350. Conventional F-Series trucks were F-500 to F-900; COE chassis were renamed C-Series trucks. While the cabs, doors, radiator support, inner fenders and hoods are the same from 1953 to 1956 F-100 & F-250s (the fenders varied on F-250, F-350, F-500 and long boxes were only available on F-250), in 1956 the cab underwent a major revision. Centered around a wraparound windshield, the cab was given new doors, a redesigned dashboard, and an (optional) panoramic rear window. I...

    Introduced in 1957, the third generation F-series was a significant modernization and redesign. Front fenders became integrated into the body, and the new Styleside bed continued the smooth lines to the rear of the pickup. The cab-over F-Series was discontinued, having been replaced by the tilt-cab C-Series. In 1959, Ford began in-house production of four-wheel-drive pickups.

    Ford introduced a dramatically new style of pickup in 1961 with the fourth generation F-Series. Longer and lower than its predecessors, these trucks had increased dimensions and new engine and gearbox choices. Additionally, the 1961–1963 models offered an optional unibody design with the cab and bed integrated. The traditional separate cab/bed was offered concurrently. The unibody proved unpopular, and Ford discontinued the option after the 1963 model year. In 1965, the F-Series was given a significant mid-cycle redesign. A completely new platform, including the "Twin I-Beam" front suspension, was introduced and would continue to be used until 1996 on the F-150 and until 2016 on the F-250/350 4x2. Additionally, the Ranger name made its first appearance in 1965 on a Ford pickup; previously the Ranger denoted a base model of the Edsel but starting in 1965, it would be used to denote a high-level styling package for F-Series pickups.

    Introduced in 1967, the fifth generation F-series pickup was built on the same platform as the 1965 revision of the fourth generation. Dimensions and greenhouse glass were increased, engine options expanded, and plusher trim levels became available during the fifth generation's production run. Suspension components from all 1969 F-Series models are completely interchangeable.

    The sixth generation F-series was introduced in 1973. This version of the F-series continued to be built on the 1965 fourth generation's revised platform, but with significant modernization and refinements, including front disc brakes, increased cabin dimensions, full double wall bed construction and increased use of galvanized steel. The FE engine series was discontinued in 1976 after a nearly 20-year run, replaced by the more modern 335 & 385 series engines. In 1975, the F-150 was introduced in between the F-100 and the F-250 in order to avoid certain emission control restrictions. For 1978, square headlights replaced the previous models' round ones on higher trim package models, such as Lariat and Ranger, and in 1979 became standard equipment. Also for 1978, the Ford Bronco was redesigned into a variant of the F-series pickup. 1979 was the last year that the 460 engine was available in a half ton truck.

    The seventh-generation F-Series was introduced for 1980, marking the first ground-up redesign of the model line since 1965. Alongside an all-new chassis, the pickup trucks received a completely new body. While distinguished by straighter body lines, the aerodynamics of the exterior were optimized to improve fuel economy. Sharing their cab structure with F-Series pickup trucks, medium-duty trucks (F-600 through F-800) underwent their first redesign since 1967. The powertrain line of this generation underwent multiple revisions through its production. At its launch, the engine line was largely carried over from 1979. While the 7.5L V8 was dropped entirely, a 4.2L V8 was introduced as the smallest V8 engine. For 1982, a 3.8L V6 became the standard engine for the F-100. For 1983, to improve the fuel efficiency of the model line, the M-Series engines (the 5.8L 351M and 6.6L 400 V8s) were dropped; the latter was replaced by the return of the 7.5L V8. In response to low demand and poor per...

    The eighth-generation F-Series was introduced for 1987 as a major revision of the 1980–1986 generation. While the cab was carried over, many body panels were revised, including a completely new front fascia; the interior also underwent a redesign. The long-running Flareside bed design was retired, with all examples produced with Styleside beds. Following the 1986 transition of the 5.0L V8 to fuel injection, the 4.9L I6 followed suit for 1987, with the 5.8L and 7.5L engines doing so for 1988; the F-Series became the first American pickup truck model line sold without carbureted engines. The same year, the 6.9L diesel V8 was increased in size to 7.3L. Following the discontinuation of the 3-speed manual, a 5-speed manual became standard equipment (a 4-speed remained a special-order option until 1989). For 1989, an E4OD4-speed automatic (overdrive version of the C6 heavy-duty 3-speed) was introduced. Slotted between the F-350 and F-600, the F-Super Duty was introduced in 1987; an ancest...

    The ninth-generation F-Series was introduced for 1992 as the second redesign of the 1980 F-Series architecture. Adapting design elements from the newly introduced Explorer and redesigned E-Series and Ranger, the F-Series received a slightly lower hoodline, rounding the front fenders, bumper, and grille. Coinciding with a redesign of the interior, the F-Series received a driver-side airbag. After a six-year hiatus, the FlareSide bed made its return, becoming a sub-model of the F-150. To appeal to younger buyers, the bodywork of the FlareSide bed was modernized, adapting the fenders of a dual rear-wheel F-350 to a single rear-wheel chassis. To commemorate the 75th anniversary of the first Ford factory-produced truck (the 1917 Ford Model TT), Ford offered a 75th anniversary package on its 1992 F-series, consisting of a stripe package, an argent colored step bumper, and special 75th anniversary logos. In response to the Chevrolet 454SS pickup truck, Ford introduced the SVT Lightning, po...

    For the 1997 model year, Ford made a substantial change to the F-Series range of trucks, splitting its pickup line into two vehicle families. From the 1970s to the 1990s, pickup trucks had transitioned in usage. Alongside vehicles designed exclusively for work use, the market segment saw a major increase in demand for dual-purpose vehicles for both work and personal use, effectively serving as a second car. To further expand its growing market share, Ford sought to develop vehicles for both types of buyers, repackaging the F-150 in a more contemporary design (as a larger version of the Ranger) while retaining the heavier-duty F-250 and F-350 for customers interested in a work-use vehicle. The tenth-generation F-Series was introduced in January 1996 as a 1997 model. Initially released solely as the F-150, a higher-GVWR F-250 was released in 1997. The model line was marketed alongside its predecessor, pared down to the F-250HD and F-350; for 1999, these were replaced by the Super Duty...

    • Ford Lobo (Mexico, 1992–present)
    • Full-size pickup truck
    • 1948–present
    • Ford
  7. Ford F-Series (medium duty truck) - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Ford_F-650

    For 1970, Ford introduced L-Series range of conventional trucks. The first Class 8 conventional truck not derived from the F-Series, the L-Series (nicknamed the Louisville Line) replaced the N-Series and the heavy-duty F-Series. In another change, the stand-alone T-series designation for tandem-axle trucks (T-700 and above) was withdrawn.

  8. Essential Guide to Truck Classification (Classes 1 through 9 ...

    www.fullbay.com › blog › truck-classification

    Truck classification for medium trucks involves Classes 4, 5, and 6. That’s where commercial trucks start to show up. Classes 4 and 5 include some full-size trucks used non-commercially. Still, most of the medium-class vehicles are made and used for commercial purposes. Class 4 —The GVWRs for this class range between 14,001 and 16,000 pounds.

  9. TRUCK CLASSIFICATIONS & “TON” RATINGS

    www.harbencalifornia.com › pdf › truck-classifications

    Class 6 The Class 6 truck gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) ranges from 19501–26000 lb (8846– 11793 kg).[2] Examples of trucks in this class include the International Durastar, GMC Topkick C6500.[15] and the Ford F-650 Heavy duty Class 7 Vehicles in Class 7 and above require a Class B license to operate in the United States. These

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  10. Commercial Truck Vehicle Classification Guide

    www.thebalancesmb.com › commercial-motor-vehicle
    • Understanding Gross Vehicle Weight Rating
    • Light-Duty Trucks
    • Medium-Duty Trucks
    • Heavy-Duty Trucks
    • Vehicle Regulations

    The GVWR is a safety standard used to prevent the overloading of trucks. It's the maximum safe operating weight of a vehicle, and it includes the net weight of the vehicle itself, plus passengers, drivers, fuel, and cargo. The GVWR of a truck does not change after a manufacturer determines it for a vehicle. The vehicle manufacturer determines the GVWR by considering the combined weight of the strongest weight-bearing components, such as the axles; and the weaker components, such as the body, frame, ​suspension, and tires. This determines the vehicle's class, which determines the regulations that it needs to follow. In some cases, drivers may need to obtain a certain type of licensebefore driving a vehicle.

    The light-duty trucks category includes commercial truck classes 1, 2, and 3. 1. Class 1: This class of truck has a GVWR of 0–6,000 pounds or 0–2,722 kilograms. 2. Class 2: This class of truck has a GVWR of 6,001–10,000 pounds or 2,722–4,536 kilograms.1

    The medium-duty trucks category includes commercial truck classes 4, 5, and 6. 1. Class 3: This class of truck has a GVWR of 10,001–14,000 pounds or 4,536–6,350 kilograms. 2. Class 4: This class of truck has a GVWR of 14,001–16,000 pounds or 6,351–7,257 kilograms. 3. Class 5: This class of truck has a GVWR of 16,001–19,500 pounds or 7,258–8,845 kilograms. 4. Class 6: This class of truck has a GVWR of 19,501–26,000 pounds or 8,846-11,793 kilograms.1

    The heavy-duty trucks category includes commercial truck classes 7 and 8. Drivers of vehicles in these classes are required to have a Class B commercial driving license (CDL) to operate the vehicle.2 1. Class 7: This class of truck has a GVWR of 26,001 to 33,000 pounds or 11,794–14,969 kilograms. 2. Class 8: This class of truck has a GVWR of greater than 33,001 pounds or 14,969 kilograms and includes all tractor-trailers.1

    If a vehicle has a GVWR of more than 10,001 pounds and is used for a business, including nonprofits, then it is subject to federal and state safety regulations for the safe operation of commercial motor vehicles. Vehicles over this weight are required to stop at state weigh and inspection stations, and drivers must follow regulations concerning hours of service and medical examination. A driver does not need a CDL to operate vehicles in Class 1 through Class 6, but each one with a GVWR over 10,001 pounds has to be identified with the name of the company and the USDTnumber.3 It's important to remember to always check with the U.S. Department of Transportation and your state and local transportation authorities to ensure that you are in compliance with the most recent rules, regulations, and laws. If you're operating a commercial vehicle outside of the United States, then you'll need to contact the transportation authority of ​the county in which you plan to operate the vehicle.

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