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  1. Typhoid fever - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Typhoid_fever

    Typhoid fever, also known as typhoid, is a disease caused by Salmonella serotype Typhi bacteria. Symptoms may vary from mild to severe, and usually begin 6 to 30 days after exposure. [1] [2] Often there is a gradual onset of a high fever over several days. [1]

    • Lizzie Van Zyl

      Elizabeth Cecilia van Zyl Afrikaans pronunciation:...

    • Typhus

      Typhus, also known as typhus fever, is a group of infectious...

  2. Typhoid - Simple English Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    simple.wikipedia.org › wiki › Typhoid

    Typhoid, also called typhoid fever, is not an illness caused by the bacterium Salmonella Typhi. The disease is spread through water which has the Salmonella Typhi bacteria in it ( transmission is by faeco oral route) Typhoid usually lasts between two weeks and a month. The symptoms of typhoid often appear 10 to 14 days after infection.

  3. Epidemiology of typhoid fever - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Epidemiology_of_typhoid_fever

    In 2000, typhoid fever caused an estimated 21.7 million illnesses and 217,000 deaths. It occurs most often in children and young adults between 5 and 19 years old. In 2013, it resulted in about 161,000 deaths – down from 181,000 in 1990. Infants, children, and adolescents in south-central and Southeast Asia experience the greatest burden of illness. Outbreaks of typhoid fever are also frequently reported from sub-Saharan Africa and countries in Southeast Asia. In the United States, about ...

  4. Category:Typhoid fever - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Category:Typhoid_fever

    Pages in category "Typhoid fever" The following 22 pages are in this category, out of 22 total. This list may not reflect recent changes ().

  5. Typhoid fever - Wikimedia Commons

    commons.wikimedia.org › wiki › Typhoid_fever

    Nov 04, 2019 · Typhoid fever (or enteric fever) is an illness caused by the bacterium Salmonella Typhi. Common worldwide, it is transmitted by ingestion of food or water contaminated with feces from an infected person. The agent The disease

  6. Typhoid vaccine - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Typhoid_vaccine

    Typhoid vaccines are vaccines that prevent typhoid fever. Several types are widely available: typhoid conjugate vaccine, Ty21a and Vi capsular polysaccharide vaccine. They are about 30 to 70% effective for the first two years depending on the specific vaccine in question. The Vi-rEPA vaccine has been shown to be efficacious in children. The World Health Organization recommends vaccinating all children in areas where the disease is common. Otherwise they recommend vaccinating those at high risk.

    • AU: B2
    • US: ℞-only
    • Typhim Vi, Vivotif
    • Typhoid
  7. Paratyphoid fever - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Paratyphoid_fever
    • Overview
    • Signs and symptoms
    • Cause
    • Pathophysiology
    • Prevention
    • Treatments

    Paratyphoid fever, also known simply as paratyphoid, is a bacterial infection caused by one of the three types of Salmonella enterica. Symptoms usually begin 6–30 days after exposure and are the same as those of typhoid fever. Often, a gradual onset of a high fever occurs over several days. Weakness, loss of appetite, and headaches also commonly occur. Some people develop a skin rash with rose-colored spots. Without treatment, symptoms may last weeks or months. Other people may carry the...

    Paratyphoid fever resembles typhoid fever. Infection is characterized by a sustained fever, headache, abdominal pain, malaise, anorexia, a nonproductive cough, a relative bradycardia, and hepatosplenomegaly. About 30% of Caucasians develop rosy spots on the central body. In adults, constipation is more common than diarrhea. Only 20 to 40% of people initially have abdominal pain. Nonspecific symptoms such as chills, sweating, headache, loss of appetite, cough, weakness, sore throat, dizziness, an

    Paratyphoid fever is caused by any of three serovars of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica: S. Paratyphi A, S. Paratyphi B, S. Paratyphi C.

    After ingestion, if the immune system is unable to stop the infection, the bacteria multiply and then spread to the bloodstream, after which the first signs of disease are observed in the form of fever. They penetrate further to the bone marrow, liver, and bile ducts, from which bacteria are excreted into the bowel contents. In the second phase of the disease, the bacteria penetrate the immune tissue of the small intestine, and the initial symptoms of small-bowel movements begin.

    Providing basic sanitation and safe drinking water and food are the keys for controlling the disease. In developed countries, enteric fever rates decreased in the past when treatment of municipal water was introduced, human feces were excluded from food production, and pasteurization of dairy products began. In addition, children and adults should be carefully educated about personal hygiene. This would include careful handwashing after defecation and sexual contact, before preparing or eating f

    Control requires treatment of antibiotics and vaccines prescribed by a doctor. Major control treatments for paratyphoid fever include ciprofloxacin for 10 days, ceftriaxone/cefotaxime for 14 days, or aziththromycin.

    • Fever, headache, rash, weakness
    • Antibiotics
  8. Mary Mallon - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Typhoid_Mary

    Mary Mallon, also known as Typhoid Mary, was an Irish-born cook believed to have infected 53 people with typhoid fever, three of whom died, and the first person in the United States identified as an asymptomatic carrier of the disease, Salmonella typhi. Because she persisted in working as a cook, by which she exposed others to the disease, she was twice forcibly quarantined by authorities, eventually for the final two decades of her life. Mallon died after a total of nearly 30 years in isolation

  9. Typhoid Mary (comics) - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Typhoid_Mary_(comics)

    Typhoid Mary first appeared in Daredevil #254 (May 1988), and was created by writer Ann Nocenti and artist John Romita Jr. Her name comes from early 20th-century Irish-American cook and typhoid fever carrier "Typhoid Mary" Mallon.

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