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  1. West Semitic languages - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/West_Semitic_languages

    The West Semitic languages are a proposed major sub-grouping of ancient Semitic languages.The term was first coined in 1883 by Fritz Hommel.. The grouping, supported by Semiticists like Robert Hetzron and John Huehnergard, divides the Semitic language family into two branches: Eastern and Western.

  2. West Semitic languages - Simple English Wikipedia, the free ...

    simple.wikipedia.org/wiki/West_Semitic_languages

    The West Semitic languages are a large branch of Semitic languages. It is the only branch of Semitic languages with languages still spoken. The other branch of Semitic languages was East Semitic. It is extinct. The two branches of West Semitic languages are Central and Southern. Some linguists disagree with the branches. They think that Central ...

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    What are the East Semitic languages?

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  4. Semitic languages - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Semitic_languages

    The Semitic languages, previously also named Syro-Arabian languages, are a branch of the Afroasiatic language family originating in the Middle East that are spoken by more than 330 million people across much of West Asia, North Africa, the Horn of Africa, Malta, in small pockets in the Caucasus as well as in often large immigrant and expatriate communities in North America, Europe and Australasia.

  5. West Semitic languages - Wikipediam.org

    en.wikipediam.org/wiki/West_Semitic_languages

    The West Semitic languages are a proposed major sub-grouping of ancient Semitic languages.The term was first coined in 1883 by Fritz Hommel.. The grouping, supported by Semiticists like Robert Hetzron and John Huehnergard, divides the Semitic language family into two branches: Eastern and Western.

  6. Semitic languages - Simple English Wikipedia, the free ...

    simple.wikipedia.org/wiki/Semitic_languages

    The Semitic languages are a branch of the Afroasiatic language family, which originated in the Middle East. Semitic languages are spoken by more than 470 million people across much of Western Asia , North Africa and the Horn of Africa , as well as in large communities of people from different countries in North America and Europe .

  7. Talk:West Semitic languages - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Talk:West_Semitic_languages

    The remainder of Semitic languages are classed as West Semitic. The term Central Semitic is a less-accepted term an generally refers to the NW Semitic languages (Canaanite, Aramaic and Ugaritic) grouped with the Arabic language. The difficulty is with Arabic, which seems to have some links with South Semitic languages and some with NW Semitic.

  8. Northwest Semitic languages - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Northwest_Semitic_languages

    Central Semitic is either a subgroup of West Semitic or a top-level division of Semitic alongside East Semitic and South Semitic. SIL Ethnologue in its system of classification (of living languages only) eliminates Northwest Semitic entirely by joining Canaanite and Arabic in a "South-Central" group which together with Aramaic forms Central ...

  9. Semitic people - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Semitic_people

    The terminology is now largely obsolete outside the grouping "Semitic languages" in linguistics. [6] [7] [8] First used in the 1770s by members of the Göttingen School of History , this Biblical terminology for race was derived from Shem ( Hebrew : שֵׁם ‎), one of the three sons of Noah in the Book of Genesis , [9] together with the ...

  10. East Semitic languages - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/East_Semitic_languages

    East Semitic languages stand apart from other Semitic languages, traditionally called West Semitic, in a number of respects: historically, it is believed that this linguistic situation came about as speakers of East Semitic languages wandered further east, settling in Mesopotamia during the third millennium BCE, as attested by Akkadian texts ...

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