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      • Each diocesan bishop is bound to appoint a judicial vicar, or officialis, with ordinary power to judge, distinct from the vicar general unless the small size of the diocese or the small number of cases suggests otherwise. §2. The judicial vicar constitutes one tribunal with the bishop but cannot judge cases which the bishop reserves to himself.
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  2. t. e. In the Roman Catholic Church, a judicial vicar or episcopal official (Latin: officialis) is an officer of the diocese who has ordinary power to judge cases in the diocesan ecclesiastical court. Although the diocesan bishop can reserve certain cases to himself, the judicial vicar and the diocesan bishop are a single tribunal, which means that decisions of the judicial vicar cannot be appealed to the diocesan bishop but must instead be appealed to the appellate tribunal.

  3. In a diocese, the natural judge is the diocesan bishop ( Codex iuris canonici c. 1419 § 1; Codex Canonum Ecclesiarium Orientalium c. 1066 § 1), who constitutes one tribunal with the judicial vicar, or chief judge, of his court ( Codex iuris canonici c. 1420 § 2; Codex Canonum Ecclesiarium Orientalium c. 1086 § 2). History.

  4. Jan 10, 2018 · Just as the United States has a judiciary branch, so too every diocese has a judicial arm. It’s headed by the bishop, who typically designates a judicial vicar to oversee it. In the Diocese of Arlington, the tribunal is headed by Father Robert J .Rippy, who originally was appointed to the position by then Bishop Paul S. Loverde in 2015.

  5. §1. Each diocesan bishop is bound to appoint a judicial vicar, or officialis, with ordinary power to judge, distinct from the vicar general unless the small size of the diocese or the small number of cases suggests otherwise. §2. The judicial vicar constitutes one tribunal with the bishop but cannot judge cases which the bishop reserves to himself.

  6. The major difference between U.S. practice and that in several other English-speaking countries is the form of address for archbishops and bishops. In Britain and countries whose Roman Catholic usage it directly influenced: Archbishop: the Most Reverend (Most Rev.); addressed as Your Grace rather than His Excellency or Your Excellency.