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  1. History of Boston - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_Boston

    He became the first European colonist to settle in Boston. A group of English Puritans founded the Plymouth Colony in 1620, just to the south of Massachusetts Bay. The Puritans encouraged further colonial settlement and immigration to the New World because King Charles I of England was in favor of suppressing the religious practices of Puritans ...

  2. How St. Augustine Became the First European Settlement in ...

    www.history.com/news/st-augustine-first-american...

    Sep 29, 2020 · Even before Jamestown or the Plymouth Colony, the oldest permanent European settlement in what is now the United States was founded in September 1565 by a Spanish soldier named Pedro Menéndez de ...

  3. History of Boston, Massachusetts

    historyofmassachusetts.org/a-brief-history-of...

    Jul 23, 2011 · After a settlement known as the Gorges colony failed in Weymouth, Massachusetts in 1623, almost all of the colonists returned to England, except for one, Reverend William Blackstone. Blackstone, an Anglican clergymen, moved from Weymouth to Shawmut in the area that is now Beacon Hill. This made him the first settler to live in Boston.

  4. William Blackstone - First European Settler of Boston and ...

    www.waymarking.com/...First_European_Settler_of_Boston...

    Oct 06, 2009 · Reverend William Blaxton (also spelled William Blackstone) (1595 - 1675) was an early British settler in New England, and the first European settler of modern day Boston and Rhode Island. Blaxton was born in County Durham, England and attended Cambridge University, earning a bachelor's degree in 1617 and a master's in 1621.

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  6. Early Settlers In Rhode Island | The Joseph Bucklin Society

    bucklinsociety.net/colonial-history/early-settlers-in...

    Rev. William Blackstone (1595 – 1675) (also spelled “Blaxton”) was the first European to settle in what is now Boston, and probably the second European to settle in what is now Rhode Island. (See note re Hazel.) Not much is known about Blackstone.

  7. Massachusetts

    u-s-history.com/pages/h1909.html

    John Cabot is thought to have seen the coast in 1498. Samuel de Champlain mapped the coastline in 1605. The first permanent European settlement in Massachusetts was at Plymouth, where pilgrims who crossed from England on the Mayflower started a community in 1620.

  8. Timeline and History of Boston Massachusetts 1630-1795

    www.bostonteapartyship.com/boston-history

    Officially founded in 1630 by English Puritans who fled to the new land to pursue religious freedom, Boston is considered by many to be the birthplace of the American Revolution. It was here that the Sons of Liberty led by Samuel Adams, inspired colonists to fight for their freedom against the domination of British Rule.

  9. Who Were The First Europeans To Settle In What Is Now The US?

    www.worldatlas.com/articles/who-were-the-first...

    Apr 27, 2020 · The first settlement established in what is now U.S. territory was Caparra, the first capital of Puerto Rico, established in 1508. Plymouth, established in 1620 in present-day Massachusetts, was the colony of the so-called Pilgrims. “In 1492, Columbus sailed the ocean blue,” so the story goes.

  10. The Pilgrims - HISTORY

    www.history.com/topics/colonial-america/pilgrims

    A scouting party was sent out, and in late December the group landed at Plymouth Harbor, where they would form the first permanent settlement of Europeans in New England.

  11. Who were Nantucket's first settlers? - Nantucket Historical ...

    nha.org/.../who-were-nantuckets-first-settlers

    By 1700, only about 300 white people and 800 Indians were living peacefully with one another, the native population having been decimated by diseases introduced by the Europeans. Excerpt from “Nantucket in a Nutshell” by Elizabeth Oldham, Historic Nantucket, Winter 2000, Vol. 49.

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