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  1. Black British people - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_British

    Black British people are British citizens of either African descent or of Black African-Caribbean (sometimes called "Afro-Caribbean") background. The term Black British developed in the 1950s, referring to the Black British West Indian people from the former Caribbean British colonies in the West Indies (i.e., the New Commonwealth) now referred to as the Windrush Generation and people from ...

    • 1,846,614 (3.5%) (2011 census)
    • 36,178 (0.7%) (2011 census)
    • 3,616 (0.2%) (2011 census)
    • 18,276 (0.6%) (2011 census)
  2. Category:Black British people - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Black_British_people

    Pages in category "Black British people" The following 100 pages are in this category, out of 100 total. This list may not reflect recent changes ().

  3. Black British are people who have British nationality but are originally from Africa.. The 2001 UK census says there are 1.2 million Black British people. They are 2.33% of the population of the United Kingdom.

    • White and Black Caribbean, White and Black African, White and Asian, Any other mixed background
    • African, Caribbean, Other Black
  4. People also ask

    What is the history of the Black British?

    Who were the British Black Panthers?

    What is the Black Caribbean population in the UK?

  5. Black British identity - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_British_identity

    Black British identity is the objective or subjective state of perceiving oneself as a black British person and as relating to being black British. Researched and discussed across a wide variety of mediums; the identity usually interesects with, and is driven by, black African and Afro-Caribbean heritage, and association with African diaspora and culture.

  6. British Black music - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_British_music

    British Black Gospel: The Foundations of This Vibrant UK Sound. Oxford: Monarch Books. ISBN 978-1854248961. Simons Andrew. Black British Swing: The African Diaspora's Contribution to England's Own Jazz of the 1930s and 1940s. Northway Publications. Schwartz, Roberta Freund (2007).

  7. Black elite - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_British_elite

    The Black elite is any elite, either political or economic in nature, that is made up of people who identify as of Black African descent. In the Western World , it is typically distinct from—but nevertheless often overlaps with—other national elites, such as the United Kingdom 's aristocracy and the United States ' upper class .

  8. Classification of ethnicity in the United Kingdom - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Classification_of_ethnicity...

    Asian or Asian British: A1: Indian A2: Pakistani A3: Bangladeshi A9: Any other Asian background Black or Black British: B1: Caribbean B2: African B9: Any other Black background Mixed: M1: White and Black Caribbean M2: White and Black African M3: White and Asian M9: Any other mixed background Chinese or any other ethnic group: O1: Chinese O9 ...

  9. British Black Panthers - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/British_Black_Panthers

    The British Black Panthers (BBP) or the British Black Panther movement (BPM) was a Black Power organisation in the United Kingdom that fought for the rights of Black people and peoples of colour in the country. The BBP were inspired by the US Black Panther Party, though they were unaffiliated with them.

  10. Black Loyalist - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_Loyalist

    The British transported more than 3,000 Black Loyalists to Nova Scotia, the greatest number of people of African descent to arrive there at any one time. One of their settlements, Birchtown, Nova Scotia was the largest free African community in North America for the first few years of its existence.

  11. Black War - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_War

    The Black War was the period of violent conflict between British colonists and Aboriginal Australians in Tasmania from the mid-1820s to 1832. The conflict, fought largely as a guerrilla war by both sides, claimed the lives of more than 200 European colonists and between 600 and 900 Aboriginal people, nearly annihilating the island's indigenous population.

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