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  1. en.wikipedia.org › wiki › FederalismFederalism - Wikipedia

    Federalism is a mixed or compound mode of government that combines a general government (the central or "federal" government) with regional governments (provincial, state, cantonal, territorial, or other sub-unit governments) in a single political system, dividing the powers between the two.

  2. Federalism in the United States is the constitutional division of power between U.S. state governments and the federal government of the United States. Since the founding of the country, and particularly with the end of the American Civil War , power shifted away from the states and toward the national government.

  3. New Federalism is a political philosophy of devolution, or the transfer of certain powers from the United States federal government back to the states.The primary objective of New Federalism, unlike that of the eighteenth-century political philosophy of Federalism, is the restoration to the states of some of the autonomy and power which they lost to the federal government as a consequence of ...

  4. The phrase Imperial and Royal (German: kaiserlich und königlich, pronounced [ˈkaɪzɐlɪç ʔʊnt ˈkøːnɪklɪç]), typically abbreviated as k. u. k., k. und k ...

  5. en.wikipedia.org › wiki › BB - Wikipedia

    B, or b, is the second letter of the Latin-script alphabet, used in the modern English alphabet, the alphabets of other western European languages and others worldwide.Its name in English is bee (pronounced / ˈ b iː /), plural bees.

  6. en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Public_lawPublic law - Wikipedia

    History of public law. The distinction between public and private law was first made by Roman jurist Ulpian, who argues in the Institutes (in a passage preserved by Justinian in the Digest) that "[p]ublic law is that which respects the establishment of the Roman commonwealth, private that which respects individuals' interests, some matters being of public and others of private interest."

  7. en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Human_rightsHuman rights - Wikipedia

    Human rights are moral principles or norms for certain standards of human behaviour and are regularly protected in municipal and international law. [citation not found] They are commonly understood as inalienable, fundamental rights "to which a person is inherently entitled simply because she or he is a human being" and which are "inherent in all human beings", regardless of their age, ethnic ...

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