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  1. Fever - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fever

    Fever, also referred to as pyrexia, is defined as having a temperature above the normal range due to an increase in the body's temperature set point. There is not a single agreed-upon upper limit for normal temperature with sources using values between 37.2 and 38.3 °C (99.0 and 100.9 °F) in humans.

  2. Rheumatic fever - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rheumatic_fever

    Rheumatic fever (RF) is an inflammatory disease that can involve the heart, joints, skin, and brain. The disease typically develops two to four weeks after a streptococcal throat infection . [2] Signs and symptoms include fever , multiple painful joints , involuntary muscle movements , and occasionally a characteristic non- itchy rash known as ...

  3. Fever (Little Willie John song) - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fever_(Little_Willie_John...

    "Fever" is a song written by Eddie Cooley and Otis Blackwell, who used the pseudonym John Davenport. It was originally recorded by American R&B singer Little Willie John for his debut album, Fever (1956), and released as a single in April of the same year.

    • "Letter from My Darling"
    • May 1956
  4. Dengue fever - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dengue_fever

    Dengue fever is a mosquito-borne tropical disease caused by the dengue virus. Symptoms typically begin three to fourteen days after infection. These may include a high fever, headache, vomiting, muscle and joint pains, and a characteristic skin rash.

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  6. Q fever - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Q_fever
    • Overview
    • Signs and symptoms
    • Diagnosis
    • Prevention
    • Treatment
    • Epidemiology

    Q fever or query fever is a disease caused by infection with Coxiella burnetii, a bacterium that affects humans and other animals. This organism is uncommon, but may be found in cattle, sheep, goats, and other domestic mammals, including cats and dogs. The infection results from inhalation of a spore-like small-cell variant, and from contact with the milk, urine, feces, vaginal mucus, or semen of infected animals. Rarely, the disease is tick-borne. The incubation period is 9–40 days...

    Incubation period is usually two to three weeks. The most common manifestation is flu-like symptoms with abrupt onset of fever, malaise, profuse perspiration, severe headache, muscle pain, joint pain, loss of appetite, upper respiratory problems, dry cough, pleuritic pain, chills, confusion, and gastrointestinal symptoms, such as nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. About half of infected individuals exhibit no symptoms. During its course, the disease can progress to an atypical pneumonia, which can

    Diagnosis is usually based on serology rather than looking for the organism itself. Serology allows the detection of chronic infection by the appearance of high levels of the antibody against the virulent form of the bacterium. Molecular detection of bacterial DNA is increasingly used. Culture is technically difficult and not routinely available in most microbiology laboratories. Q fever can cause endocarditis which may require transoesophageal echocardiography to diagnose. Q fever hepatitis man

    Protection is offered by Q-Vax, a whole-cell, inactivated vaccine developed by an Australian vaccine manufacturing company, CSL Limited. The intradermal vaccination is composed of killed C. burnetii organisms. Skin and blood tests should be done before vaccination to identify pre-existing immunity, because vaccinating people who already have an immunity can result in a severe local reaction. After a single dose of vaccine, protective immunity lasts for many years. Revaccination is not generally

    Treatment of acute Q fever with antibiotics is very effective and should be given in consultation with an infectious diseases specialist. Commonly used antibiotics include doxycycline, tetracycline, chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin, ofloxacin, and hydroxychloroquine.Chronic Q fever is more difficult to treat and can require up to four years of treatment with doxycycline and quinolones or doxycycline with hydroxychloroquine.Q fever in pregnancy is especially difficult to treat because doxycycline a

    The pathogenic agent is found worldwide, with the exception of New Zealand. The bacterium is extremely sustainable and virulent: a single organism is able to cause an infection. The common source of infection is inhalation of contaminated dust, contact with contaminated milk, meat, or wool, and particularly birthing products. Ticks can transfer the pathogenic agent to other animals. Transfer between humans seems extremely rare and has so far been described in very few cases.

    • Query fever, coxiellosis
    • acute, chronic
  7. Fever Facts: High Temperature Causes and Treatments

    www.webmd.com/first-aid/fevers-causes-symptoms...

    Fever Causes. A fever can be a sign of several health conditions, which may or may not need medical treatment. The most common causes of fever are infections such as colds and stomach bugs ...

  8. Saturday Night Fever - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saturday_Night_Fever

    Saturday Night Fever is a 1977 American dance drama film directed by John Badham.It stars John Travolta as Tony Manero, a working-class young man who spends his weekends dancing and drinking at a local Brooklyn discothèque; Karen Lynn Gorney as Stephanie Mangano, his dance partner and eventual confidante; and Donna Pescow as Annette, Tony's former dance partner and would-be girlfriend.

  9. Valley Fever: Symptoms, Causes, Diagnosis, Treatment

    www.webmd.com/a-to-z-guides/valley-fever

    Valley fever’s symptoms start out much like those of the flu. But this illness comes from a fungus that lives in the soil, and a few cases are serious.

  10. Fever - Symptoms and causes - Mayo Clinic

    www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/fever/...
    • Overview
    • Symptoms
    • Causes
    • Complications
    • Prevention

    A fever is a temporary increase in your body temperature, often due to an illness. Having a fever is a sign that something out of the ordinary is going on in your body.For an adult, a fever may be uncomfortable, but usually isn't a cause for concern unless it reaches 103 F (39.4 C) or higher. For infants and toddlers, a slightly elevated temperature may indicate a serious infection.Fevers generally go away within a few days. A number of over-the-counter medications lower a fever, but sometime...

    You have a fever when your temperature rises above its normal range. What's normal for you may be a little higher or lower than the average normal temperature of 98.6 F (37 C).Depending on what's causing your fever, additional fever signs and symptoms may include: 1. Sweating 2. Chills and shivering 3. Headache 4. Muscle aches 5. Loss of appetite 6. Irritability 7. Dehydration 8. General weaknessChildren between the ages of 6 months and 5 years might experience febrile seizures. About a third...

    Fever occurs when an area in your brain called the hypothalamus (hi-poe-THAL-uh-muhs) — also known as your body's \\"thermostat\\" — shifts the set point of your normal body temperature upward. When this happens, you may feel chilled and add layers of clothing or wrap up in a blanket, or you may shiver to generate more body heat, eventually resulting in an elevated body temperature.Normal body temperature varies throughout the day — it's lower in the morning and higher in the late afternoon and e...

    Children between the ages of 6 months and 5 years may experience fever-induced convulsions (febrile seizures), which usually involve loss of consciousness and shaking of limbs on both sides of the body. Although alarming for parents, the vast majority of febrile seizures cause no lasting effects.If a seizure occurs: 1. Lay your child on his or her side or stomach on the floor or ground 2. Remove any sharp objects that are near your child 3. Loosen tight clothing 4. Hold your child to prevent...

    You may be able to prevent fevers by reducing exposure to infectious diseases. Here are some tips that can help: 1. Wash your hands often and teach your children to do the same, especially before eating, after using the toilet, after spending time in a crowd or around someone who's sick, after petting animals, and during travel on public transportation. 2. Show your children how to wash their hands thoroughly, covering both the front and back of each hand with soap and rinsing completely unde...

  11. Coccidioidomycosis - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coccidioidomycosis

    An animal infected with Valley fever cannot transmit the disease to other animals. In dogs, the most common symptom of coccidioidomycosis is a chronic cough, which can be dry or moist. Other symptoms include fever (in approximately 50% of cases), weight loss, anorexia, lethargy, and depression.