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    • Key Takeaways: Film Noir

      What Is Film Noir? Elements and Examples of the Genre
      • Film noir is a genre of dark detective films made primarily during the 1940s and 1950s.
      • The genre is known for using low-budget filmmaking tricks to create striking visual effects, particularly with regard to lighting.
      • Notable examples of film noir include The Maltese Falcon, Double Indemnity, Sweet Smell of Success, and Touch of Evil.
      www.liveabout.com/what-is-film-noir-4176811
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  2. Film noir - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Film_noir

    Neo-noir film borrows from and reflects many of the characteristics of the film noir: a presence of crime, violence, complex characters and plot-lines, mystery, ambiguity and moral ambivalence, all come into play in the neon-noir genre.

  3. What Is Film Noir? Elements and Examples of the Genre

    www.liveabout.com › what-is-film-noir-4176811

    Nov 12, 2018 · Film noir is a genre of dark detective films made primarily during the 1940s and 1950s. The genre is known for using low-budget filmmaking tricks to create striking visual effects, particularly with regard to lighting. Notable examples of film noir include The Maltese Falcon, Double Indemnity, Sweet Smell of Success, and Touch of Evil.

  4. film noir | Definition, Movies, & Facts | Britannica

    www.britannica.com › art › film-noir

    Film noir, (French: “dark film”) style of filmmaking characterized by such elements as cynical heroes, stark lighting effects, frequent use of flashbacks, intricate plots, and an underlying existentialist philosophy. The genre was prevalent mostly in American crime dramas of the post- World War II era. Out of the Past

  5. What Is Film Noir? Genre & Best Movies Explained | Screen Rant

    screenrant.com › film-noir-genre-explained-best-movies
    • The History of Film Noir
    • Film Noir Style
    • Neo-Noir/Modern Film Noir
    • Classic Film Noir Examples

    Film noir had its beginnings in the 1930s, but didn't really take off until the 1940s. Its origins are often attributed to attitudes of pessimism and anxiety that arose from World War II, but film noir wasn't inspired by any one cultural event. One contributing factor was literature. At the time, hardboiled detective stories and crime mysteries written by novelists like Dashiell Hammett and Raymond Chandler were in high demand. Adapting these books into movies is part of what created the framework for film noir. In 1946, French critics came up with the term "film noir" to describe the dark mood of these new films, and the name stuck, even though it didn't become widely used until years later. Film noir became one of the most popular genres in the 1940s, and this continued into the 1950s. The 1940s and 1950s are still regarded as the high point of film noir.

    What made telling these stories so difficult was the Motion Picture Production Code, a set of moral guidelines that affected all American movies beginning in 1930. Back then, there was no MPAA, or a rating system to give films age restrictions like "PG-13". The Production Code forced all films to obey the same rules. Under the new rules, there was so much that movies weren't allowed to show. A person couldn't be killed on-screen, kissing scenes couldn't be too long, bad guys could never get away with their crimes, and so on. While some movies avoided these problems by telling different kinds of stories, others viewed the Production Code as a challenge, and found ways to subvert the rules using suggestive dialogue, new lighting techniques, shadows, and more. Filmmakers also embraced the black & white B-movie format. Black & white film was less expensive than color, and it enhanced the mood. Related: 10 Classic Movies Everyone Should Stream on The Criterion Channel Now There are a num...

    The golden age of film noir is over, but its influences are still present in modern cinema, hence the rise of "neo-noir." The newer films don't have to go by the same rules, since the Production Code ended in 1968. A film that's considered "neo-noir" can be characterized by the same elements found in the older films, such as femme fatales, anti-heroes, and complex storylines. Plots also involved mystery and crime, but not exclusively. A modern noir movie doesn't have to be about a detective trying to solve a murder, or a private eye getting mixed up with a woman who murdered her husband. For instance, science fiction movies like Blade Runner have enough of these qualities for film historians to classify them as film noir. Other modern movies that share this label are John Wick, The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo, and A Walk Among the Tombstones.

    Among the most notable examples of classic film noir are Double Indemnity, Laura, Vertigo, and This Gun for Hire. One of the earliest -- and most famous -- is The Maltese Falcon. Directed by John Huston, the 1942 film starred Humphrey Bogart as Sam Spade, a private eye who gets dragged into a mystery that revolves around the whereabouts of a priceless artifact. A beautiful woman and several nefarious individuals stand in the way of Sam Spade's objective. The movie exhibits all of the qualities expected from a film noir. There's also Gilda from 1946, which stars Glenn Ford as a bodyguard caught in a love triangle with his narcissistic boss and his beautiful, carefree ex-girlfriend played by Rita Hayworth. Gilda is an interesting movie because for the most part, it's more of a story of hate than it is of love. Gilda takes a typical Hollywood love story and turns into something dark and twisted. The main characters' hatred for each other is exemplified by Rita Hayworth's line, "I hate...

    • Nicholas Raymond
  6. What is Film Noir? A Brief History with Examples from Cinema

    www.studiobinder.com › blog › what-is-film-noir

    Aug 29, 2019 · Film noir is a stylized genre of film marked by pessimism, fatalism, and cynicism. The term was originally used in France after WWII, to describe American thriller or detective films in the 1940s and 50s.

  7. A Guide to Film Noir Genre | Roger Ebert | Roger Ebert

    www.rogerebert.com › a-guide-to-film-noir-genre

    Jan 30, 1995 · Film noir is... 1. A French term meaning "black film," or film of the night, inspired by the Series Noir, a line of cheap paperbacks that translated hard-boiled American crime authors and found a popular audience in France. 2.

  8. Film Noir as Genre or Movement - Film Noir

    www.classicfilmnoir.com › 2014 › 09

    Genres then are often typified by subject matter and objects within the stories, and it is this which will lead you to the conclusion that film noir is in fact a movement, and not a genre, as it is characterised by a visual style and a certain type of anti-hero, and actually cuts across genres.

  9. Film Noir | What Is Noir?

    www.whatisnoir.com

    Noir is more than simply a genre, and it is certainly not just a part of the crime genre. Noir is considered also to be a style as well as a feeling. This dictionary definition does however sum up the general misuse of the term. Often this is how the term is used, or rather misused, today.

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