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  1. Jack L. Warner - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Jack_L

    Jack L. Warner. Jack Leonard Warner (born Jacob Warner; August 2, 1892 – September 9, 1978) was an American film executive, born in Canada, who was the president and driving force behind the Warner Bros. Studios in Burbank, California. Warner's career spanned some 45 years, its duration surpassing that of any other of the seminal Hollywood ...

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      Life. Page was the daughter of Mexican-American actor Don...

    • Early Years
    • Professional Career
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    • References

    Jacob Warner (as he was named at birth) was born in Lon­don, On­tario, in 1892. His par­ents were Jew­ish im­mi­grants from Poland who spoke mainly Yid­dish. Jack was the fifth sur­viv­ing son of Ben­jamin Warner a cob­bler from Kras­nosielc, Poland (then lo­cated in the "Russ­ian" part of Poland known as Con­gress King­dom), and his wife, the for­mer Pearl Leah Eichelbaum. Fol­low­ing their mar­riage in 1876, the cou­ple had three chil­dren in Poland, one of whom died at a young age.One of the sur­viv­ing chil­dren was Jack's el­dest brother, Hirsch (later Harry). The Warner fam­ily had oc­cu­pied a "hos­tile world" where the "night-rid­ing of cos­sacks, the burn­ing of houses, and the rap­ing of women (dur­ing pogroms) were part of life's bur­den for the Jews of the 'shtetl'". In 1888, in search of a bet­ter fu­ture for his fam­ily and him­self, Ben­jamin made his way to Ham­burg, Ger­many, and then took a ship to Amer­ica. The Warner sur­name was per­haps orig­i­nally "Won­sal" o...

    Early business ventures

    In Youngstown, the Warner broth­ers took their first ten­ta­tive steps into the en­ter­tain­ment in­dus­try. In the early 20th cen­tury, Sam Warner formed a busi­ness part­ner­ship with an­other local res­i­dent and "took over" the city's Old Grand Opera House, which he used as a venue for "cheap vaude­ville and photoplays". The ven­ture failed after one sum­mer. Sam Warner then se­cured a job as a pro­jec­tion­ist at Idora Park, a local amuse­ment park. He con­vinced the fam­ily of the new m...

    Formation of Warner Bros.

    The Warner broth­ers pooled their re­sources and moved into film pro­duc­tion in 1910. Then, in 1912, they lent their sup­port to film­maker Carl Laemmle's In­de­pen­dent Mo­tion Pic­ture Com­pany, which chal­lenged the mo­nop­o­lis­tic con­trol of the Edi­son Trust. That same year, Jack Warner ac­quired a job as a film splicer in New York, where he as­sisted brother Sam with the pro­duc­tion of the film Dante's Inferno. De­spite the film's suc­cess at the box of­fice, Harry Warner re­mained...

    Depression era

    The stu­dio emerged rel­a­tively un­scathed from the Wall Street Crash of 1929 and pro­duced a broad range of films, in­clud­ing "back­stage mu­si­cals," "cru­sad­ing biopics," "swash­buck­lers," and "women's pic­tures." As Thomas Schatz ob­served, this reper­toire was "a means of sta­bi­liz­ing mar­ket­ing and sales, of bring­ing ef­fi­ciency and econ­omy into the pro­duc­tion of some fifty fea­ture films per year, and of dis­tin­guish­ing Warn­ers' col­lec­tive out­put from that of its comp...

    On Oc­to­ber 14, 1914, Warner mar­ried Irma Claire Sa­lomon, the daugh­ter of Sam Sa­lomon and Bertha Franklin Sa­lomon from one of San Fran­cisco's pi­o­neer Jew­ish families. Irma Warner gave birth to the cou­ple's only child, Jack M. Warner, on March 27, 1916. Jack Warner named the child after him­self, dis­re­gard­ing an East­ern Eu­ro­pean Jew­ish cus­tom that chil­dren should not be named after liv­ing rel­a­tives. Al­though his son bore a dif­fer­ent mid­dle ini­tial, he "has been called Ju­nior all his life". The mar­riage ended in 1935, when Warner left his wife for an­other woman, Ann Page. Warner and Ann had a daugh­ter named Barbara. Irma Warner sued her hus­band for di­vorce on the grounds of de­ser­tion. Jack's older brother, Harry, re­flected the Warner fam­ily feel­ings about the mar­riage when he ex­claimed, "Thank God our mother didn't live to see this". Warner mar­ried Ann after the di­vorce. The Warn­ers, who took Irma's side in the af­fair, re­fused to ac­cept A...

    An "ar­dent Re­pub­li­can", Jack Warner nev­er­the­less sup­ported Pres­i­dent Franklin D. Roo­sevelt and the New Deal in the early 1930s. Later in the decade, he made com­mon cause with op­po­nents of Nazi Ger­many, over­look­ing ide­o­log­i­cal dif­fer­ences with those who held left­ist po­lit­i­cal views. In 1947, how­ever, Warner served as a "friendly wit­ness" for the House Un-Amer­i­can Ac­tiv­i­ties Com­mit­tee (HUAC), thereby lend­ing sup­port to al­le­ga­tions of a "Red" in­fil­tra­tion of Hollywood. Warner felt that Com­mu­nists were re­spon­si­ble for the stu­dio's month-long strike that oc­curred in the fall of 1946, and on his own ini­tia­tive, he pro­vided the names of a dozen screen­writ­ers who were dis­missed be­cause of sus­pected Com­mu­nist sym­pa­thies, a move that ef­fec­tively de­stroyed their careers. For­mer stu­dio em­ploy­ees named by Warner in­cluded Alvah Bessie, Howard Koch, Ring Lard­ner Jr., John Howard Law­son, Al­bert Maltz, Robert Rossen, Dal­ton T...

    By the end of 1973, those clos­est to Warner be­came aware of signs that he was be­com­ing disoriented. Shortly after los­ing his way in the build­ing that housed his of­fice, Warner retired. In 1974, Warner suf­fered a stroke that left him blind and en­fee­bled. Dur­ing the next sev­eral years, he grad­u­ally lost the abil­ity to speak, and be­came un­re­spon­sive to friends and relatives. Fi­nally, on Au­gust 13, 1978, Warner was ad­mit­ted to Cedars-Sinai Hos­pi­tal, where he died of a heart in­flam­ma­tion (edema) on Sep­tem­ber 9. He was 86 years old. A fu­neral ser­vice was held at the Wilshire Boule­vard Tem­ple, the syn­a­gogue to which many mem­bers of the Warner fam­ily belonged. He was in­terred at Home of Peace Ceme­tery in East Los An­ge­les, Cal­i­for­nia. Jack Warner left be­hind an es­tate es­ti­mated at $15 mil­lion. Much of the Warner es­tate, in­clud­ing prop­erty and mem­o­ra­bilia, was be­queathed to his widow, Ann. Warner, how­ever, left $200,000 to his es­tran...

    Behlmer, Rudy (1985). Inside Warner Bros. (1935–1951). New York: Viking Press. ISBN 0-670-80478-9
    Buhle, Paul; Wagner, Dave (2002). Radical Hollywood: The Untold Story Behind America's Favorite Movies. New York: The New Press. ISBN 1-56584-718-0
    Ceplair, Larry; Englund, Steven (1980). The Inquisition in Hollywood: Politics in the Film Community, 1930–1960. Garden City, NY: Anchor Press/ Doubleday. ISBN 0-385-12900-9
    Corey, Melinda; Ochoa, George (2002). The American Film Institute Desk Reference. New York: Dorling Kindersley Publishing. ISBN 0-7894-8934-1
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  3. Jack Warner - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Jack_Warner

    Jack L. Warner (1892–1978), head of Warner Bros. studio Jack M. Warner (1916–1995), American film producer Jack Warner (actor) (1895–1981), British film and television actor

  4. Talk:Jack L. Warner - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Talk:Jack_L

    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jack L. Warner is a featured article; it (or a previous version of it) has been identified as one of the best articles produced by the Wikipedia community. Even so, if you can update or improve it, please do so. This article appeared on Wikipedia's Main Page as Today's featured article on July 28, 2011.

  5. Jack L. Warner - Wikipedia

    ro.wikipedia.org › wiki › Jack_L

    Jack L. Warner De la Wikipedia, enciclopedia liberă Jack Leonard " J. L. " Warner (n. 2 august 1892, London, Ontario – d. 9 septembrie 1978) a fost un producător american de filme care a înființat și condus alături de frații săi studiourile Warner Bros. din Burbank, California.

  6. Jack Warner (actor) - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Jack_Warner_(actor)
    • Overview
    • Early life
    • Career
    • Personal life and death
    • Filmography

    Jack Warner, OBE was a British film and television actor. He is closely associated with the role of PC George Dixon, which he played in the 1950 film The Blue Lamp and later in the television series Dixon of Dock Green from 1955 until 1976, but he was also for some years one of Great Britain's most popular film stars.

    Warner was born Horace John Waters in Bromley, Poplar, London, the third child of Edward William Waters, master fulling maker and undertaker's warehouseman, and Maud Mary Best. His sisters Elsie and Doris Waters were well-known comediennes, who usually performed as "Gert and Daisy". Warner attended the Coopers' Company's Grammar School for Boys in Mile End, while his sisters both attended the nearby sister school, Coborn School for Girls in Bow. The three children were choristers at St. Leonard'

    Warner first made his name in music hall and radio. By the early years of the Second World War he was nationally known and starred in a BBC radio comedy show, Garrison Theatre, invariably opening with "A Monologue Entitled...".

    Warner married Muriel Winifred Peters, a company secretary, in 1933. They had no children. Warner was appointed an Officer of the Order of the British Empire in 1965. In 1973, he was made a Freeman of the City of London. Warner commented in his autobiography that the honour "entitles me to a set of 18th century rules for the conduct of life urging me to be sober and temperate". Warner added, "Not too difficult with Dixon to keep an eye on me!" He died, aged 85, of pneumonia in the Royal Masonic

    For a number of years, British film exhibitors voted him among the top ten British stars at the box office via an annual poll in the Motion Picture Herald. 1. 1948 – 7th-most popular British star 2. 1949 – 10th-most popular British star 3. 1950 – 3rd 4. 1952 – 8th ...

    • 24 May 1981 (aged 85), London, England
    • Horace John Waters, 24 October 1895, Bromley-by-Bow, London, England
  7. Jack Leonard Warner (born Jacob Warner; August 2, 1892 – September 9, 1978) was a Canadian-American film executive who was the president and driving force behind the Warner Bros. Studios in Burbank, California. Warner's career spanned some 45 years, its duration surpassing that of any other of the seminal Hollywood studio moguls.

  8. Jack Warner (actor) — Wikipedia Republished // WIKI 2

    wiki2.org › en › Jack_Warner_(actor)
    • Life and Career
    • Personal Life
    • Filmography
    • References
    • External Links

    Early life

    Warner was born Horace John Waters. in Bromley, Poplar, London, the third child of Edward William Waters, master fulling maker and undertaker's warehouseman, and Maud Mary Best. His sisters Elsie and Doris Waters were well-known comedians who usually performed as "Gert and Daisy". Warner attended the Coopers' Company's Grammar School for Boys in Mile End, while his sisters both attended the nearby sister school, Coborn School for Girls in Bow. The three children were choristers at St. Leonard...

    Acting career

    Warner first made his name in music hall and radio. By the early years of the Second World War, he was nationally known and starred in a BBC radio comedy show Garrison Theatre, invariably opening with, "A Monologue Entitled...". Warner's first film was The Dummy Talks(1943), in which he had the lead role. He had a support role in The Captive Heart (1946), a successful film. Also popular was Hue and Cry (1947) and Dear Murderer(1947).

    Film stardom

    Warner first really made his mark as a movie star as the patriarch of the Hugget family in Holiday Camp (1947) which was a big hit. He played a policeman in It Always Rains on Sunday (1947) another popular movie and was another family man in the comedy Easy Money(1948). He was in a war film Against the Wind (1948) and starred in a thriller My Brother's Keeper (1948). The Huggett family had been so well received in Holiday Camp that Gainsborough decided to give them their own series, so Warner...

    Warner married Muriel Winifred (Mollie) Peters, a company secretary, in 1933. They had no children. Warner was appointed an Officer of the Order of the British Empire (OBE) in 1965.In 1973, he was made a Freeman of the City of London. Warner commented in his autobiography that the honour "entitles me to a set of 18th century rules for the conduct of life urging me to be sober and temperate". Warner added, "Not too difficult with Dixon to keep an eye on me!" He died of pneumonia in London in 1981, aged 85. The characterisation by Warner of Dixon was held in such high regard that officers from Paddington Green Police Stationbore the coffin at his funeral. Warner is buried in East London Cemetery.

    Box office ranking

    For a number of years, British film exhibitors voted him among the top ten local stars at the box office via an annual poll in the Motion Picture Herald. 1. 1948 – 7th most popular British star 2. 1949 – 10th most popular British star 3. 1950 – 3rd (5th most popular overall) 4. 1952 – 8th most popular British star 5. 1953 – 7th most popular British star

    Sydney-Smith, Susan (2002). Beyond Dixon of Dock Green: Early British Police Series. London: I. B. Tauris. ISBN 1-86064-790-1
    Warner, Jack (1975). Jack of All Trades: The Autobiography of Jack Warner. London: W.H. Allen. ISBN 0-491-01952-1
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