Yahoo Web Search

  1. List of Chinese administrative divisions by area - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › List_of_Chinese

    This is a list of the first-level administrative divisions of the People's Republic of China (PRC), including all provinces (except the claimed Taiwan Province), autonomous regions, special administrative regions, and municipalities, in order of their total land area as reported by the national or provincial-level government.

  2. Administrative divisions of China - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Administrative_divisions_of

    Levels. The Constitution of China provides for four levels [citation needed]: the provincial (province, autonomous region, municipality, and special administrative region), the prefectural (prefecture-level city [officially "city with district-level divisions" (设区的市) and "city without district-level divisions" (不设区的市)], autonomous prefecture, prefecture [additional division ...

  3. People also ask

    What are the different administrative divisions in China?

    Why are there so many divisions in China?

    How many provinces does the People ' s Republic of China have?

    How many levels of local government are there in China?

  4. List of Chinese administrative divisions by population ...

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › List_of_Chinese

    This is a list of Chinese administrative divisions in order of their total resident populations. It includes all provinces, autonomous regions, direct-controlled municipalities and special administrative regions controlled by the Republic of China (1912–1949) or the People's Republic of China (1949–present).

    Administrative Division
    2010
    2000
    1990
    1,347,339,000
    1,273,050,000
    1,160,017,381
    104,303,132
    85,225,007
    62,829,236
    100,063,065
    89,971,789
    84,392,827
    94,023,567
    91,236,854
    85,509,535
  5. Provinces of China - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › List_of_Chinese
    • Overview
    • Types of provincial-level divisions
    • History
    • Economies

    Provincial-level administrative divisions or first-level administrative divisions, are the highest-level Chinese administrative divisions. There are 34 such divisions claimed by the People's Republic of China, classified as 23 provinces, four municipalities, five autonomous regions, and two Special Administrative Regions; The political status of Taiwan Province along with a small fraction of Fujian Province remain in dispute, those are under separate rule by the Republic of China. Province-level

    The government of each standard province is nominally led by a provincial committee, headed by a secretary. The committee secretary is first-in-charge of the province; second-in-command is the governor of the provincial government. In practice, day-to-day affairs are managed by a

    A municipality or municipality directly under the administration of the central government is a higher level of city which is directly under the Chinese government, with status equal to that of the provinces. In practice, their political status is higher than that of common provi

    An autonomous region is a minority subject which has a higher population of a particular minority ethnic group along with its own local government, but an autonomous region theoretically has more legislative rights than in actual practice. The governor of each autonomous region i

    By the latter half of the Qing Dynasty, there were 18 provinces, all of them in China proper. Jiangsu and Anhui were originally one province called Jiangnan, with its capital at Nanjing. There was no discrete time period when the two halves of Jiangnan were split, but rather, thi

    The provinces in southeast coastal area of China – such as Jiangsu, Zhejiang, Fujian and Guangdong – tend to be more industrialized, with regions in the hinterland less developed.

  6. Political divisions of China - Simple English Wikipedia, the ...

    simple.wikipedia.org › wiki › Political_divisions_of

    Special Administrative Regions There are 2 special administrative regions in the People's Republic of China. "Special administrative region" is the common English name for the Chinese tèbié xíngzhèng qū , meaning an area under special administration as a result of treaties that returned former European colonies to Chinese control.

  7. List of Chinese administrative divisions by GDP - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › List_of_Chinese

    List of Chinese prefecture-level cities by GDP Notes [ edit ] This is a list of the first-level administrative divisions of Mainland China (including all provinces, autonomous regions, and municipalities) in order of their total gross domestic product .

  8. List of administrative divisions by country - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › List_of_administrative

    Administrative divisions with ISO 3166-1 . Administrative divisions with ISO 3166-1 are cited for statistics matters even when they do not have a special status (for example, the overseas regions of France). Antarctic claims . Administrative divisions that are entirely Antarctic claims suspended under the Antarctic Treaty are not listed.

  9. List of Chinese administrative divisions by area - The Reader ...

    thereaderwiki.com › en › List_of_Chinese

    This is a list of the first-level administrative divisions of the People's Republic of China (PRC), including all provinces (except the claimed Taiwan Province), autonomous regions, special administrative regions, and municipalities, in order of their total land area as reported by the national or p

  10. Provinces And Administrative Divisions Of China - WorldAtlas

    www.worldatlas.com › articles › provinces-and
    • The People’s Republic of China
    • Provinces
    • Municipalities
    • Autonomous Regions
    • Special Administrative Regions
    • Disputed Claims Regarding Taiwan

    China is the largest country in Asia, and also has the biggest population in the world (1.35 billion people). The main language is Mandarin and the major religions are Buddhism, Christianity, Taoism, and Islam. The intricate culture has roots dating back around 4,000 years, and is responsible for many modern-day inventions including the printing press and gunpowder. In 1949, the country became the People’s Republic of China when the Communist party defeated the Nationalist Kuomintang. The cou...

    After the Central government, provinces make up the first level of political divisions. While these provinces and their leaders work under command from the Central government, they do exercise significant autonomy over economic policies. The Chinese provinces are Anhui, Fujian, Gansu, Guangdong, Guizhou, Hainan, Hebei, Heilongjiang, Henan, Hubei, Hunan, Jiangsu, Jiangxi, Jilin, Liaoning, Qinghai, Shaanxi, Shandong, Shanxi, Sichuan, Yunnan, and Zhejiang. The boundaries of the majority of these...

    Municipalities are larger city divisions. They do not, however, work under provincial rule. Municipalities are considered the first level of government after the Central government, equal to their Province counterparts. This is the highest level of classification for a city. The cities included here are Beijing, Chongqing, Shanghai, and Tianjin. These include the main urban area and its surround rural zones. Here, the mayor holds the highest rank. This official also serves on the National Peo...

    Another member of the first level of government after the Central or federal government is the autonomous region. These regions are typically based on cultural presence and have a higher population of a certain ethnic group than is represented in other areas of China. These regions are similar to provinces in that they have their own governing body although autonomous regions hold more legislative rights. The autonomous regions of China include Guangxi, Inner Mongolia, Ningxia, Tibet, and Xin...

    Different from other first level governing divisions, the special administrative regions consist of separate Chinese territories. These regions fall under the rule of the central government though are not located within the Chinese mainland. They practice a more complete level of autonomy with their own governments, multiparty legislatures, currency, immigration policies, and legal systems (to name a few). This is called the One China, Two Systems principle. The two special administrative reg...

    Taiwan has an interesting background within the divisions of China and, like Hong Kong and Macau, China offered it a position as a special administrative region in 1981. The belief is that unifying Taiwan (whose real name is the Republic of China) with China (or the People’s Republic of China) would allow the People’s Republic of China to be the only representative of China. This confusion began in 1949 after the Chinese Civil War. This war, as mentioned, was between Kuomintang (the founder o...

    • Amber Pariona
  11. People also search for