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  1. Philippine nationality law. The Philippine nationality law is based upon the principles of jus sanguinis ( Latin for right of blood) and therefore descent from a parent who is a citizen or national of the Republic of the Philippines is the primary method of acquiring Philippine citizenship. This is contrasted with the legal principle of jus ...

    • Citizenship by Birth
    • Citizenship by Naturalization
    • Loss and Reacquisition of Philippine Citizenship
    • Travel Freedom
    • See Also
    • Further Reading
    • External Links

    Philip­pine na­tion­al­ity law pro­vides that a per­son is a Philip­pine cit­i­zen by birth if 1. that person was born on or after January 17, 1973 and at least one parent was a Philippine citizen on the birthdate; 2. or that person was born before January 17, 1973 whose father was a Philippine citizen— or whose mother was a Philippine citizen and the person has formally elected Philippine citizenship upon reaching the age of majority; 3. or that person was born on or after May 14, 1935 and the father was a Philippine citizen or, if the father was not, the mother was a Philippine citizen and the person elected Philippine citizenship pursuant to the provisions of the 1935 Constitution; 4. or that person was born on or after August 29, 1916 and prior to May 14, 1935 and at least one parent was an inhabitant and resident of the Philippine Islands and a Spanish subject on April 11, 1899, or that person was an inhabitant and resident of the Philippine Islands and a Spanish subject on Apr...

    Com­mon­wealth Act No. 473, the Re­vised Nat­u­ral­iza­tion Law, ap­proved June 17, 1939, pro­vided that per­sons hav­ing cer­tain spec­i­fied qual­i­fi­ca­tions may be­come a cit­i­zen of the Philip­pines by naturalization. Sec­tion 2 of CA No. 473 spec­i­fies that the ap­pli­cant must pos­sess the fol­low­ing qual­i­fi­ca­tions: 1. He must be not less than twenty-one years of age on the day of the hearing of the petition; 2. He must have resided in the Philippines for a continuous period of not less than ten years; 3. He must be of good moral character and believe in the principles underlying the Philippine Constitution, and must have conducted himself in a proper and irreproachable manner during the entire period of his residence in the Philippines in his relation with the constituted government as well as with the community in which he is living. 4. He must own real estate in the Philippines worth not less than five thousand pesos, Philippine currency, or must have some known lu...

    Com­mon­wealth Act No. 63, dated Oc­to­ber 20, 1936, pro­vides that Philip­pine cit­i­zens may lose cit­i­zen­ship in any of the fol­low­ing ways or events: 1. 1.1. By naturalization in a foreign country; 1.2. By express renunciation of citizenship; 1.3. By subscribing to an oath of allegiance to support the constitution or laws of a foreign country upon attaining twenty-one years of age or more: Provided, however, that a Filipino may not divest himself of Philippine citizenship in any manner while the Republic of the Philippines is at war with any country. 1.4. By rendering services to, or accepting commission in, the armed forces of a foreign country, and the taking of an oath of allegiance incident thereto, except in certain specified cases; 1.5. By cancellation of the certificates of naturalization; 1.6. By having been declared by competent authority, a deserter of the Philippine armed forces in time of war, unless subsequently, a plenary pardon or amnesty has been granted; and...

    In 2017, Philip­pines cit­i­zens had visa-free or visa on ar­rival ac­cess to 61 coun­tries and ter­ri­to­ries, rank­ing the Philip­pine pass­port 75th in terms of travel free­dom ac­cord­ing to the Visa Re­stric­tions Index.

    Cortes, Irene R; Lotilla, Raphael Perpetuo M (1990), "Nationality and International Law from the Philippine Perspective", in Ko, Swan Sik (ed.), Nationality and International Law in Asian Perspecti...
    Cornelius J. Peck (1965), "Nationalistic Influences on the Philippine Law of Citizenship", The American Journal of Comparative Law, The American Journal of Comparative Law, Vol. 14, No. 3, 14 (3):...
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    What is the law of nationality in the Philippines?

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    • Please (or Can I) Remove...
    • Natural Born Filipino
    • Citizenship by Naturalization Section
    • Misplaced Material Duplicating Material Already Present in The Article
    • Adjective
    • Language Requirement For Naturalization
    • Case Law

    May I remove the section Treaty of Paris?That section has this quotation:"The Spaniards residing in the territories over which Spain by this treaty cedes or relinquishes her sovereignty shall be subject in matters civil as well as criminal to the jurisdiction of the courts of the country wherein they reside, pursuant to the ordinary laws governing the same; and they shall have the right to appear before such courts, and to pursue the same course as citizens of the country to which the courts belong."I think it only says that Spaniards who reside in the territories reliquished by Spain (that includes the Philippine Islands) will only be covered by any of all the courts in their residence, not necessarily that those Spaniards will be Filipino citizens. -Pika ten10 (talk) 04:58, 4 January 2008 (UTC)[] 1. That raises the question of the nationality of the inhabitants of the Philippine Islands prior to the Treaty of Paris. Were all of them except those visiting from other countries "Span...

    Doesn't the 2003 law allowed any child of even only one Filipino parent, no matter when born, to be considered a "natural born Filipino" as per http://www.gov.ph/faqs/dualcitizenship.asp item 2 and 3(4)? —Preceding unsigned comment added by RWIR (talk • contribs) 08:34, 5 December 2008 (UTC)[] 1. This is not the proper forum for asking questions like this, but I'll try to answer. RA9225 (the 2003 law) does not answer that question. A child born on or after October 15, 1986 (the date the 1987 constitution was adopted) whose father or mother was an RP citizen at the time of their birth is a natural-born citizen. A child born before that date and on or after January 17, 1973 (the ratification date of the 1973 constitution) whose father and mother were both RP citizens at the time of their birth is a natural-born citizen. A child born before that date and on or after May 14, 1935 (the ratification date of the 1935 constitution) whose father was an RP citizen at the time of their birth o...

    In this edit, I just reverted the insertion of a large block of text in the Citizenship by naturalization section. I had already reverted the addition of this text once today as it is unsupported and seems to be original research. I'm deleting it a second time today because I've masked the reinsertion with a later edit to another section of the article. Wtmitchell (talk) (earlier Boracay Bill) 11:49, 8 June 2010 (UTC)[]

    I've just reverted this edit. The problem with the insertion is that it is being done in the Loss and reacquisition of Philippine citizenship section, and the material discusses neither loss of nor reacquisition of Philippine citizenship. The info in the material is already covered in the Citizenship by naturalization section of the article. This is the latest of several reversion of edits by the reverted anon to insert this material. I have placed several warnings on his talk page, and the latest warning is level-4. In that latest warning, I asked the anon to discuss the insertion of this material here. Wtmitchell (talk) (earlier Boracay Bill) 05:52, 30 August 2011 (UTC)[]

    "Visa requirements for Filipino citizens" Should be "Philippine". 23.81.209.173 (talk) 16:31, 12 January 2018 (UTC)[] 1. Resolved Wtmitchell (talk) (earlier Boracay Bill) 22:09, 12 January 2018 (UTC)[]

    The fifth required qualification in CA 473 says, "He must be able to speak and write English or Spanish and any one of the principal Philippine languages; and". I had previously taken this to require English or (alternatively) Spanish and (in addition to one or both of those) any one of the principal Philippine languages. However, a friend has suggested that this ought to be read as requiring English (alone) or Spanish and (additionally) any one of the principal Philippine languages. My friend says that a he got this understanding from a Philippine lawyer. Contrary to my initial understanding, I see a point here about and binding more tightly than or, but I'm no grammarian and am certainly not qualified to re interpret dodgy-looking grammatical constructions in legislation. Does anyone have a source with further info on this? Perhaps a scholarly article or a Supreme Court decision? Wtmitchell (talk) (earlier Boracay Bill) 10:15, 29 March 2018 (UTC)[] This gets a bit messy here. Sorr...

    Unfortunately the main entry does not refer to the important impact that case law, especially the Villahermosa case of 1948, have had on the law. In that case the Supreme Court legislated from the bench and changed from jus soli (presumably inherited from America) to jus sanguinis (the then-civil-law-country predominant system). There may have been a racial component to that decision. See http://www.uniset.ca/phil/ (last updated 2005). Maybe that's too much to expect from an editor who is a non-lawyer? Andygx (talk) 11:15, 14 October 2018 (UTC)[] 1. Racial, nationalistic, and sexist; see and section 1(7) here. However, You appear to be incorrect is saying that prior to that decision the Philippines based citizenship on jus soli. See Article IV of the 1935 Philippine constitution. Wtmitchell (talk) (earlier Boracay Bill) 15:09, 14 October 2018 (UTC)[]

    • Citizenship by Birth
    • Citizenship by Naturalization
    • Loss and Reacquisition of Philippine Citizenship
    • Travel Freedom
    • See Also
    • Further Reading
    • External Links

    Philippine nationality law provides that a person is a Philippine citizen by birth if 1. that person was born on or after January 17, 1973 and at least one parent was a Philippine citizen on the birthdate; 2. or that person was born before January 17, 1973 whose father was a Philippine citizen— or whose mother was a Philippine citizen and the person has formally elected Philippine citizenship upon reaching the age of majority; 3. or that person was born on or after May 14, 1935 and the father was a Philippine citizen or, if the father was not, the mother was a Philippine citizen and the person elected Philippine citizenship pursuant to the provisions of the 1935 Constitution; 4. or that person was born on or after August 29, 1916 and prior to May 14, 1935 and at least one parent was an inhabitant and resident of the Philippine Islands and a Spanish subject on April 11, 1899, or that person was an inhabitant and resident of the Philippine Islands and a Spanish subject on April 11, 18...

    Commonwealth Act No. 473, the Revised Naturalization Law, approved June 17, 1939, provided that persons having certain specified qualifications may become a citizen of the Philippines by naturalization. Section 2 of CA No. 473 specifies that the applicant must possess the following qualifications: 1. He must be not less than twenty-one years of age on the day of the hearing of the petition; 2. He must have resided in the Philippines for a continuous period of not less than ten years; 3. He must be of good moral character and believe in the principles underlying the Philippine Constitution, and must have conducted himself in a proper and irreproachable manner during the entire period of his residence in the Philippines in his relation with the constituted government as well as with the community in which he is living. 4. He must own real estate in the Philippines worth not less than five thousand pesos, Philippine currency, or must have some known lucrative trade, profession, or lawf...

    Commonwealth Act No. 63, dated October 20, 1936, provides that Philippine citizens may lose citizenship in any of the following ways or events: 1. 1.1. By naturalization in a foreign country; 1.2. By express renunciation of citizenship; 1.3. By subscribing to an oath of allegiance to support the constitution or laws of a foreign country upon attaining twenty-one years of age or more: Provided, however, that a Filipino may not divest himself of Philippine citizenship in any manner while the Republic of the Philippines is at war with any country. 1.4. By rendering services to, or accepting commission in, the armed forces of a foreign country, and the taking of an oath of allegiance incident thereto, except in certain specified cases; 1.5. By cancellation of the certificates of naturalization; 1.6. By having been declared by competent authority, a deserter of the Philippine armed forces in time of war, unless subsequently, a plenary pardon or amnesty has been granted; and 1.7. In the c...

    In 2017, Philippines citizens had visa-free or visa on arrival access to 61 countries and territories, ranking the Philippine passport 75th in terms of travel freedom according to the Visa Restrictions Index.

    Cortes, Irene R; Lotilla, Raphael Perpetuo M (1990), "Nationality and International Law from the Philippine Perspective", in Ko, Swan Sik (ed.), Nationality and International Law in Asian Perspecti...
    Cornelius J. Peck (1965), "Nationalistic Influences on the Philippine Law of Citizenship", The American Journal of Comparative Law, The American Journal of Comparative Law, Vol. 14, No. 3, 14 (3):...
  3. The Philippine nationality law is based upon the principles of jus sanguinis (Latin for right of blood) and therefore descent from a parent who is a citizen or national of the Republic of the Philippines is the primary method of acquiring Philippine citizenship. This is contrasted with the legal pri

  4. en.wikipedia.org › wiki › PhilippinesPhilippines - Wikipedia

    The Philippines covers an area of 300,000 km 2 (120,000 sq mi) and, as of 2020. [update] , had a population of around 109 million people, making it the world's twelfth-most populous country. The Philippines is a multinational state, with diverse ethnicities and cultures throughout its islands.

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