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      • Pop music is a type of popular music that many people like to listen to. The term "pop music" can be used for all kinds of music that was written to be popular. The word "pop music" was used from about 1880 onwards, when a type of music called music was popular.
      simple.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pop_music#:~:text=Pop%20music%20is%20a%20type%20of%20popular%20music,a%20type%20of%20music%20called%20music%20was%20popular.
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  2. Pop music - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pop_music

    Pop is a genre of popular music that originated in its modern form during the mid-1950s in the United States and the United Kingdom. The terms popular music and pop music are often used interchangeably, although the former describes all music that is popular and includes many disparate styles.

  3. Popular music - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Popular_music

    Popular music is a generic term for a wide variety of genres of music that appeal to the tastes of a large segment of the population, whereas pop music usually refers to a specific musical genre within popular music.

  4. Pop music is a type of popular music that many people like to listen to. The term "pop music" can be used for all kinds of music that was written to be popular. The word "pop music" was used from about 1880 onwards, when a type of music called music was popular.

  5. Music - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Music

    Music is an art form, and a cultural activity, whose medium is sound. General definitions of music include common elements such as pitch (which governs melody and harmony), rhythm (and its associated concepts tempo, meter, and articulation), dynamics (loudness and softness), and the sonic qualities of timbre and texture (which are sometimes termed the "color" of a musical sound).

    • various
    • Paleolithic era
  6. 1950s in music - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1950s_in_music

    During the 1950s European popular music give way to the influence of American forms of music including jazz, swing and traditional pop, mediated through film and records. The significant change of the mid-1950s was the impact of American rock and roll , which provided a new model for performance and recording, based on a youth market.

  7. Rock music - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rock_music

    Rock music is a broad genre of popular music that originated as "rock and roll" in the United States in the late 1940s and early 1950s, and developed into a range of different styles in the mid-1960s and later, particularly in the United States and the United Kingdom.

  8. J-pop - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/J-pop

    Whereas rock musicians in Japan usually hate the term "pop", Taro Kato, a member of pop punk band Beat Crusaders, pointed out that the encoded pop music, like pop art, was catchier than "J-pop" and he also said that J-pop was the pops (ポップス, poppusu) music, memorable for its frequency of airplay, in an interview when the band completed ...

  9. K-pop - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/K-pop

    K-pop (short for Korean pop; Korean: 케이팝) is a genre of popular music originating in South Korea. It is influenced by styles and genres from around the world, such as experimental, rock, jazz, gospel, hip hop, R&B, reggae, electronic dance, folk, country, and classical on top of its traditional Korean music roots.

  10. The term "pop music" can be used for all kinds of music that was written to be popular. The word "pop music" was used from about 1880 onwards, when a type of music called music was popular. Modern pop music grew out of 1950's rock and roll, (for example Chuck Berry, Bo Diddley and Little Richard) and rockabilly (for example Elvis Presley and ...

  11. Música pop – Wikipédia, a enciclopédia livre

    pt.wikipedia.org/wiki/Música_pop

    Frith, Simon (2004) Popular Music: Critical Concepts in Media and Cultural Studies, Routledge. Gillet, Charlie, (1970) The Sound of the City. The Rise of Rock and Roll, Outerbridge & Dienstfrey. Hatch, David and Stephen Millward, (1987), From Blues to Rock: an Analytical History of Pop Music, Manchester University Press, ISBN 0-7190-1489-1