Yahoo Web Search

  1. About 3,180,000 search results
  1. en.wikipedia.org › wiki › PoseidonPoseidon - Wikipedia

    Poseidon ( / pəˈsaɪdən, pɒ -, poʊ -/; Greek: Ποσειδῶν, pronounced [poseːdɔ̂ːn]) was one of the Twelve Olympians in ancient Greek religion and myth, god of the sea, storms, earthquakes and horses. In pre-Olympian Bronze Age Greece, he was venerated as a chief deity at Pylos and Thebes.

  2. Poseidon: Neptune: God of the seas, water, storms, hurricanes, earthquakes and horses. The middle son of Cronus and Rhea. Brother of Zeus and Hades. Married to the Nereid Amphitrite; although, as with many of the male Greek gods, he had many lovers. His symbols include the horse, bull, dolphin, and trident. Demeter: Ceres

  3. People also ask

    Who was the wife of Poseidon in Greek mythology?

    Who are some of Poseidon's famous children?

    How is Poseidon related to the goddess Persephone?

    What did Poseidon like to do with his lovers?

  4. en.wikipedia.org › wiki › AmphitriteAmphitrite - Wikipedia

    • Mythology
    • Representation and Cult
    • Amphitrite Legacy
    • General References

    Amphitrite was a daughter of Nereus and Doris (and thus a Nereid), according to Hesiod's Theogony, but of Oceanus and Tethys (and thus an Oceanid), according to the Bibliotheca, which actually lists her among both the Nereids and the Oceanids. Others called her the personification of the sea itself (saltwater). Amphitrite's offspring included seals and dolphins. She also bred sea monsters and her great waves crashed against the rocks, putting sailors at risk. Poseidon and Amphitrite had a son, Triton who was a merman, and a daughter, Rhodos (if this Rhodos was not actually fathered by Poseidon on Halia or was not the daughter of Asopus as others claim). Bibliotheca (3.15.4) also mentions a daughter of Poseidon and Amphitrite named Kymopoleia. Amphitrite is not fully personified in the Homeric epics: "out on the open sea, in Amphitrite's breakers" (Odyssey iii.101), "moaning Amphitrite" nourishes fishes "in numbers past all counting" (Odyssey xii.119). She shares her Homeric epithet...

    Though Amphitrite does not figure in Greek cultus, at an archaic stage she was of outstanding importance, for in the Homeric Hymn to Delian Apollo, she appears at the birthing of Apollo among, in Hugh G. Evelyn-White's translation, "all the chiefest of the goddesses, Dione and Rhea and Ichnaea and Themis and loud-moaning Amphitrite"; more recent translators are unanimous in rendering "Ichnaean Themis" rather than treating "Ichnae" as a separate identity. Theseus in the submarine halls of his father Poseidon saw the daughters of Nereus dancing with liquid feet, and "august, ox-eyed Amphitrite", who wreathed him with her wedding wreath, according to a fragment of Bacchylides. Jane Ellen Harrison recognized in the poetic treatment an authentic echo of Amphitrite's early importance: "It would have been much simpler for Poseidon to recognize his own son… the myth belongs to that early stratum of mythology when Poseidon was not yet god of the sea, or, at least, no-wise supreme there—Amphi...

    Amphitrite is the name of a genus of the worm family Terebellidae.
    In poetry, Amphitrite's name is often used for the sea, as a synonym of Thalassa.
    Seven ships of the Royal Navy were named HMS Amphitrite
    Amphitrite (1802 ship), which wrecked in 1833 with heavy loss of life while transporting convicts to New South Wales

    Smith, William (1873). Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology. London. "Amphitri'te". and "Halosydne".

    • Amphitrite, His Consort
    • Other Lovers
    • Sexual Violence
    • Significant Offspring
    • Sources

    Placed somewhere between the Nereids and the Oceanids, Amphitrite—the daughter of Nereus and Doris—never obtained the fame she might have earned as Poseidon's consort. Vaguely personified as the sea or seawater, she became the mother of Triton (a merman) and possibly of a daughter, Rhodos.

    Poseidon enjoyed the pleasures of the flesh, seeking romance with goddesses, humans, nymphs and other creatures. Not even physical form mattered to him: He could, and often did, transform himself or his lovers into animals so as to hide in plain sight. 1. Aphrodite, goddess of love and beauty 2. Amymone, the "blameless Danaid" who became an ancestor of the founders of Mycenae 3. Pelops, king of Pelepponesia and a founder of the Olympic Games 4. Larissa, a nymph, whose three sons with Poseidon eventually ruled all of Thessaly 5. Canace, a human woman who bore the god five children 6. Alcyone, one of the Pleiades, who bore Poseidon several children

    Poseidon, like many of the Greek gods, did not behave with perfect moral rectitude. In fact, many of the stories of Poseidon focus on rape. In the myths, he raped Medusain the temple of Athena and Athena was so angry she turned Medusa ugly and her hair into snakes. In another story, he raped Caenis and after he fell in love with her, he granted her wish of transforming her into a male warrior named Caeneus. In yet another story, Poseidon pursued the goddess, Demeter. To escape, she turned herself into a mare—but he transformed into a stallion and cornered her.

    Some of Poseidon's most notable children include: 1. Charybdis, the sea monster who (with Scylla) threatened the Strait of Messina 2. Theseus, the hero who served as the mythological founder of Athens 3. Bellerophon, the hero who captured Pegasus and killed the Chimera 4. Polyphemus, the one-eyed giant from The Odyssey 5. Procrustes, the villain who owned an iron bed to which he made his guests fit by means of his hammer Pegasus itself, the famed winged horse, sprung from Medusa's neck when Perseus delivered the fatal blow. Some legends suggest that Poseidon fathered Pegasus (Medusa's child), which would have made the horse half-brothers with his captor, Bellerophon. Some legends even suggest that Poseidon sired the ram that bore the Golden Fleece!

    Hard, Robin. "The Routledge Handbook of Greek Mythology." London: Routledge, 2003. Print.
    Leeming, David. "The Oxford Companion to World Mythology." Oxford UK: Oxford University Press, 2005. Print.
    Smith, William, and G.E. Marindon, eds. "A Classical Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography, Mythology, and Geography." London: John Murray, 1904. Print.
  5. Poseidon (/pəˈsaɪdən, pɒ-, poʊ-/; Greek: Ποσειδῶν, pronounced [poseːdɔ́ːn]) was one of the Twelve Olympians in ancient Greek religion and myth, god of the sea, storms, earthquakes and horses. In pre-Olympian Bronze Age Greece, he was venerated as a chief deity at Pylos and Thebes. His Roman equivalent is Neptune.

  6. May 02, 2020 · Poseidon ( / pəˈsaɪdən, pɒ -, poʊ -/; Greek: Ποσειδῶν, pronounced [poseːdɔ́ːn]) was one of the Twelve Olympians in ancient Greek religion and myth, god of the sea, storms, earthquakes and horses. In pre-Olympian Bronze Age Greece, he was venerated as a chief deity at Pylos and Thebes. His Roman equivalent is Neptune .

  1. People also search for