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    • President of the United States Wikipedia

      • Grover Cleveland served two non-consecutive terms in office (the only president to have done so) and is therefore counted as the 22nd and 24th president of the United States; the 45th and current president is Donald Trump (since January 20, 2017).
      en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Presidents_of_the_United_States#:~:text=Grover Cleveland served two non-consecutive terms in office,president is Donald Trump (since January 20, 2017).
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  2. List of presidents of the United States - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Presidents_of_the...

    The president of the United States is the head of state and head of government of the United States, indirectly elected to a 4-year term by the people through the Electoral College. The officeholder leads the executive branch of the federal government and is the commander-in-chief of the United States Armed Forces.

    Presidency
    Presidency
    President
    Party
    January 20, 2017 – Incumbent
    January 20, 2009 – January 20, 2017
    January 20, 2001 – January 20, 2009
    January 20, 1993 – January 20, 2001
  3. President of the United States - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/President_of_the_United_States

    The members of Congress elected a president of the United States in Congress Assembled to preside over its deliberation as a neutral discussion moderator. Unrelated to and quite dissimilar from the later office of president of the United States, it was a largely ceremonial position without much influence.

  4. List of presidents of the United States - Simple English ...

    simple.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Presidents_of...

    President State Took office Left office Party Term Previous office Vice President; 1: George Washington (1732–1799) Virginia: April 30, 1789: March 4, 1797

    President
    State
    Took office
    2
    John Adams (1735–1826)
    since March 4, 1797
    3
    Thomas Jefferson (1743–1826)
    March 4, 1801
    4
    James Madison (1751–1836)
    March 4, 1809
    5
    James Monroe (1758–1831)
    March 4, 1817
  5. The president of the United States of America (often shortened to P.O.T.U.S.) is the chief executive of the United States. The office of president was created in the United States Constitution in 1788. The first president (George Washington) took office in 1789. The president is in charge of the executive branch of the United

  6. List of Presidents of the United States - Wikipedia, the free ...

    en.wikipedia.beta.wmflabs.org/wiki/List_of...

    The president must be at least 35 years of age, has to have lived in the United States for 14 years, and has to be a "natural born" citizen of the United States. This list includes only those persons who were sworn into office as president following the ratification of the United States Constitution , which took effect on March 4, 1789.

    President
    President
    Presidency
    Party
    44
    Barack Obama Born 1961 (59 years old)
    January 20, 2009 – January 20, 2017
    Democratic
    43
    George W. Bush Born 1946 (74 years old)
    January 20, 2001 – January 20, 2009
    Republican
    42
    Bill Clinton Born 1946 (74 years old)
    January 20, 1993 – January 20, 2001
    Democratic
    41
    George H. W. Bush Born 1924 (96 years old)
    January 20, 1989 – January 20, 1993
    Republican
  7. Historical rankings of presidents of the United States ...

    simple.wikipedia.org/wiki/Historical_rankings_of...

    The following presidents are usually ranked highly: George Washington (the first president of the United States and helped the United States win the American Revolutionary War) John Adams (oversaw the Quasi-War) Thomas Jefferson (partly because of the Louisiana Purchase and for being the author of the Declaration of Independence)

  8. Powers of the president of the United States - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Powers_of_the_President_of...
    • Overview
    • Commander-in-chief
    • Executive powers
    • Powers related to legislation
    • Powers of appointment
    • Executive clemency

    The powers of the president of the United States include those powers explicitly granted by Article II of the United States Constitution to the president of the United States, powers granted by Acts of Congress, implied powers, and also a great deal of soft power that is attached to the presidency. The Constitution explicitly assigns the president the power to sign or veto legislation, command the armed forces, ask for the written opinion of their Cabinet, convene or adjourn Congress, grant repr

    The president of the United States is the commander-in-chief of the United States Armed Forces and as such exercises supreme operational command over all national military forces of the United States. In this capacity, the president has plenary power to command and control all military personnel, launch, direct and supervise military operations, order or authorize the deployment of troops, unilaterally launch nuclear weapons, and form military policy with the Department of Defense and Homeland S

    Within the executive branch itself, the president has broad powers to manage national affairs and the priorities of the government. The president can issue rules, regulations, and instructions called executive orders, which have the binding force of law upon federal agencies but do not require approval of the United States Congress. Executive orders are subject to judicial review and interpretation. The Budget and Accounting Act of 1921 put additional responsibilities on the presidency for the p

    The president has several options when presented with a bill from Congress. If the president agrees with the bill, he can sign it into law within ten days of receipt. If the president opposes the bill, he can veto it and return the bill to Congress with a veto message suggesting changes unless the Congress is out of session then the president may rely on a pocket veto. Presidents are required to approve all of a bill or none of it; selective vetoes have been prohibited. In 1996, Congress gave Pr

    Before taking office, the president-elect and his transition team must appoint people to more than 6,000 federal positions. The appointments range from top officials at U.S. government agencies, to the White House staff, and members of the United States diplomatic corps. Many, but not all, of these positions at the highest levels are appointed by the president with the advice and consent of the United States Senate. The president also nominates persons to fill federal judicial vacancies, includi

    Article II of the United States Constitution gives the president the power of clemency. The two most commonly used clemency powers are those of pardon and commutation. A pardon is an official forgiveness for an acknowledged crime. Once a pardon is issued, all punishment for the crime is waived. A person seeking executive clemency by pardon, reprieve, commutation of sentence, or remission of fine shall execute a formal petition. The petition shall be addressed to the president of the United State

  9. President-elect of the United States - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/President-elect_of_the...
    • Overview
    • Presidential election law overview
    • Presidential transitions
    • Vice president-elect

    The president-elect of the United States is the candidate who has won the United States presidential election and is awaiting inauguration to become the incumbent president. There is no explicit indication in the Constitution when that person actually becomes president-elect. An unofficial term, president-elect has been used by the media for decades. Politicians have applied the term to the declared winner, even soon after election night. While Election Day is held in early November, formal voti

    Article II, Section 1, Clause 2 of the United States Constitution, along with the Twelfth and Twentieth Amendments directly address and govern the process for electing the nation's president. Presidential elections are further regulated by various federal and state laws. Under the 1887 Electoral Count Act, the presidential electors, the members of the Electoral College, the body that directly elects the president, must be "appointed, in each state, on the Tuesday next after the first Monday in N

    Since the widespread adoption of the telegraph in the mid-19th century, the de facto president-elect has been known beyond a reasonable doubt, with only a few exceptions, within a few days of the polls closing on election day. As a result, incoming presidents gained valuable preparation time prior to assuming office. Recent presidents-elect have assembled transition teams to prepare for a smooth transfer of power following the inauguration. Outgoing presidents have cooperated with the president-

    During the presidential transition period, the president-elect's running mate is known as the vice president-elect. If the vice president-elect dies or resigns before the meeting of the Electoral College in December, the National Committee of the winning party would, in consultation with the president-elect, choose a replacement to receive the electoral votes of the vice presidential nominee in the same manner as would happen if the former vice presidential nominee had become president-elect due

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