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  1. Treaty of Paris (1814) - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Treaty_of_Paris_(1814)

    The Treaty of Paris, signed on 30 May 1814, ended the war between France and the Sixth Coalition, part of the Napoleonic Wars, following an armistice signed on 23 April between Charles, Count of Artois, and the allies. The treaty set the borders for France under the House of Bourbon and restored territories to other nations.

  2. Peace of Paris (1814) - Simple English Wikipedia, the free ...

    simple.wikipedia.org › wiki › Treaty_of_Paris_(1814)

    From Simple English Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (Redirected from Treaty of Paris (1814)) The Peace of Paris (1814) was a peace accord that ended the war between France and the Sixth Coalition (Austria, Prussia, Russia, the United Kingdom, Sweden, Spain and a number of German states). Napoleon was defeated, and driven into exile on Elba.

  3. Treaty of Paris (1815) - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Treaty_of_Paris_(1815)

    The first Treaty of Paris, of 30 May 1814, and the Final Act of the Congress of Vienna, of 9 June 1815, were confirmed. On the same day, in a separate document, Great Britain, Russia, Austria, and Prussia renewed the Quadruple Alliance .

    • Bilateral treaty
    • France, Great Britain, Sweden, Prussia, Russia
  4. Treaty of Paris (1814) — Wikipedia Republished // WIKI 2

    wiki2.org › en › Treaty_of_Paris_(1814)
    • Parties to The Treaty
    • New Borders of France
    • Plan For Congress of Vienna
    • Territories of Other Nations
    • House of Bourbon
    • Slave Trade and Slavery
    • Aftermath
    • See Also
    • Bibliography
    • External Links

    This treaty signed on 30 May 1814, fol­low­ing an armistice signed on 23 April 1814 be­tween Charles, Count of Ar­tois, and the allies. Napoleon had ab­di­cated as Em­peror on 13 April, as a re­sult of ne­go­ti­a­tions at Fontainebleau. Peace talks had started on 9 May be­tween Tal­leyrand, who ne­go­ti­ated with the al­lies of Chau­mont on be­half of the ex­iled Bour­bon king Louis XVIII of France, and the al­lies. The Treaty of Paris es­tab­lished peace be­tween France and Great Britain, Rus­sia, Aus­tria, and Prus­sia, who in March had de­fined their com­mon war aim in Chau­mont. The Treaty was also signed by Por­tu­gal and Swe­den while Spain signed shortly after in July.The al­lied par­ties did not sign a com­mon doc­u­ment, but in­stead con­cluded sep­a­rate treaties with France al­low­ing for spe­cific amendments.

    The al­lies had agreed to re­duce France to her 1792 bor­ders and re­store the in­de­pen­dence of her neigh­bors after Napoleon Bona­parte's defeat.

    In ad­di­tion to the ces­sa­tion of hos­til­i­ties, the treaty pro­vided a rough draft of a final set­tle­ment, which ac­cord­ing to ar­ti­cle 32 was to be con­cluded within the next two months at a con­gress in­volv­ing all bel­liger­ents of the Napoleonic Wars. This pro­vi­sion re­sulted in the Con­gress of Vi­enna, held be­tween Sep­tem­ber 1814 and June 1815. The pre­lim­i­nary con­di­tions al­ready agreed in Paris were mod­er­ate for France so as not to dis­turb the re-en­throne­ment of the re­turned Bour­bon king: France's bor­ders of 1 June 1792 were con­firmed, and in ad­di­tion, she was al­lowed to re­tain Saarbrücken, Saar­louis, Lan­dau, the County of Montbéliard, part of Savoy with An­necy and Chambéry, also Avi­gnon and the Com­tat Ve­naissinas well as ar­ti­facts ac­quired dur­ing the war, while on the other hand she had to cede sev­eral colonies. To dis­tin­guish this agree­ment from a sec­ond treaty of Paris, con­cluded on 20 No­vem­ber 1815 as one of the treaties am...

    The treaty reap­por­tioned sev­eral ter­ri­to­ries amongst var­i­ous coun­tries. Most no­tably, France re­tained all ter­ri­tory that it pos­sessed on 1 Jan­u­ary 1792 and so reac­quired many of the ter­ri­to­ries lost to Britain dur­ing the war. They in­cluded Guade­loupe (Art. IX), which had been ceded to Swe­den by Britain when it en­tered the coali­tion. In re­turn, Swe­den was com­pen­sated 24 mil­lion francs, which gave rise to the Guade­loupe Fund. The only ex­cep­tions were To­bago, St. Lucia, Sey­chelles and Mau­ri­tius, all of which were handed over to British con­trol. Britain kept sov­er­eignty over the is­land of Malta (Art. VII). The treaty re­turned to Spain the ter­ri­tory of Santo Domingo, which had been trans­ferred to France by the 1795 Peace of Basel in 1795 (Art. VIII). That im­plic­itly recog­nised French sov­er­eignty over Saint-Domingue, which Dessalines had pro­claimed in­de­pen­dent under the name of Haiti. France did not rec­og­nize the in­de­pen­dence of...

    The treaty recog­nised the Bour­bon monar­chy in France, in the per­son of Louis XVIII, be­cause the treaty was be­tween Louis XVIII the king of France and the heads of states of the Coali­tion great pow­ers (Pre­am­ble to the treaty).

    The treaty aimed to abol­ish the French slave trade in France but not slav­ery over a five-year pe­riod (Ad­di­tional Art. I). The ter­ri­to­ries of France were not in­cluded in this aim.

    Sev­eral pow­ers, de­spite the peace­ful in­ten­tions of the treaty, still feared a re­asser­tion of French power.[citation needed] The Nether­lands, now freed from the French em­pire, asked William I of the House of Or­ange to be their prince; he ac­cepted in late 1813. This was a first step to what oc­curred in 1815 dur­ing the Con­gress of Vi­enna and si­mul­ta­ne­ously, Napoleon's Hun­dred Days. In March 1815, the United King­dom of the Nether­lands was formed, which added the for­mer ter­ri­tory of the low coun­tries that had been ruled by the Aus­trian Em­pire to the Nether­lands, and had William I as its king. His son William joined the fight­ing at Wa­ter­loo, whose bat­tle site was lo­cated in the United King­dom of the Nether­lands. Though the Dutch ini­ti­ated their re­quest to William I, the great pow­ers of the Napoleonic wars had made a se­cret pact to sup­port a strong na­tion on that bor­der with France with William as its king, in the Eight Ar­ti­cles of Lon­don, si...

    EB staff (2014). "Treaties of Paris (1814-1815)". Britannica Online Encyclopedia. Retrieved February 15, 2018.
    Büsch, Otto (1992). Handbuch der preußischen Geschichte (in German). 3. Walter de Gruyter. pp. 72–74, 81. ISBN 3-11-008322-1.
    Malettke, Klaus (2009). Die Bourbonen 3. Von Ludwig XVIII. bis zu den Grafen von Paris (1814-1848) (in German). 3. Kohlhammer Verlag. p. 66. ISBN 3-17-020584-6.
    Rudolf, Uwe Jens; Berg, W. G. (2010). Historical Dictionary of Malta. USA: Scarecrow Press. p. 11. ISBN 9780810853171.
    Media related to Treaty of Paris, 1814at Wikimedia Commons
    Works related to Treaty of Paris (1814)at Wikisource
  5. Treaty of Fontainebleau (1814) - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Treaty_of_Fontainebleau_(1814)
    • Overview
    • Prelude
    • Terms
    • British opposition
    • Theft of document

    The Treaty of Fontainebleau was an agreement established in Fontainebleau, France, on 11 April 1814 between Napoleon and representatives of Austria, Russia and Prussia. The treaty was signed in Paris on 11 April by the plenipotentiaries of both sides and ratified by Napoleon on 13 April. With this treaty, the allies ended Napoleon's rule as emperor of the French and sent him into exile on Elba.

    In the War of the Sixth Coalition, a coalition of Austria, Prussia, Russia, Sweden, the United Kingdom and a number of German states drove Napoleon out of Germany in 1813. In 1814, while the United Kingdom, Spain and Portugal invaded France across the Pyrenees, the Russians, Austrians and their allies invaded France across the Rhine and, after the Battle of Paris, entered into negotiations with members of the French government for the abdication of Napoleon. On 31 March, the Coalition issued a d

    The agreement contained a total of 21 articles. Based on the most significant terms of the accord, Napoleon was stripped of his powers as ruler of the French Empire, but both Napoleon and Marie-Louise were permitted to preserve their respective titles as emperor and empress. Moreover, all of Napoleon's successors and family members were prohibited from attaining power in France. The treaty also established the island of Elba as a separate principality to be ruled by Napoleon. Elba's sovereignty

    The British position was that the French nation was in a state of rebellion and that Napoleon was a usurper. Castlereagh explained that he would not sign on behalf of the king of the United Kingdom because to do so would recognise the legitimacy of Napoleon as emperor of the French and that to exile him to an island over which he had sovereignty, only a short distance from France and Italy, both of which had strong Jacobin factions, could easily lead to further conflict.

    In 2005, two Americans, former history professor John William Rooney and Marshall Lawrence Pierce, were charged by a French court for stealing a copy of the Treaty of Fontainebleau from the French National Archives between 1974 and 1988. The theft came to light in 1996, when a curator of the French National Archives discovered that Pierce had put the document up for sale at Sotheby's. Rooney and Pierce pleaded guilty in the United States and were fined. However, they were not extradited to Franc

  6. War of the Sixth Coalition - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › War_of_the_Sixth_Coalition

    Napoleon abdicated on 11 April 1814 and the war officially ended soon after, although some fighting continued until May. The Treaty of Fontainebleau was signed on 11 April 1814 between the continental powers and Napoleon, followed by the Treaty of Paris on 30 May 1814 between France

  7. Treaty of Paris (1812) - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Treaty_of_Paris_(1812)
    • Overview
    • Background
    • Treaty and effect
    • Prussia in the Russian campaign

    The Treaty of Paris of 5 March 1812 between Napoleon I of France and Frederick William III of Prussia established a Franco-Prussian alliance directed against Russia. On 24 June, Prussia joined the French invasion of Russia. The unpopular alliance broke down when the Prussian contingent in French service signed a separate armistice, the Convention of Tauroggen, with Russia on 30 December 1812. On 17 March 1813, Frederick William declared war on France and issued his famous proclamation "To My Peo

    By 1811 both France and Russia were preparing for war. Early in the year a Russian approach to Prussia for an alliance was rejected, but the prospect of French soldiers using Prussia as a launching point for an invasion of Russia changed Frederick William's mind. In October, General Gerhard von Scharnhorst went to Saint Petersburg and informed the Russians that Prussia was in talks with France and asked for a military alliance. A Russo-Prussian military convention was then signed in secret. Russ

    The treaty of alliance was signed at Paris on 24 February 1812. Prussia was to open its borders to French troops and to provide the Grande Armée with 20,842 auxiliary troops, plus provisions, including thousands of packhorses and wagons. This was almost half of the Prussian Army, since the Convention of Paris of 8 September 1808—essentially a codicil to the Treaty of Tilsit of 9 July 1807—capped its strength at 42,000 men. Prussia was also promised small territorial compensation at ...

    In the initial phase of the invasion of Russia, the Prussian contingent was led by Julius von Grawert, an admirer of Napoleon. He covered the French north flank along the Baltic coast, but soon fell ill. His replacement, Hans David von Yorck, was unenthusiastic for the French alliance. When his superior, Marshal Jacques MacDonald, ordered him to fortify the city of Memel, he refused on the grounds that such an action was not covered by the treaty. During the Siege of Riga, Yorck tried to exchang

  8. Treaty of Paris (1814) - The Reader Wiki, Reader View of ...

    thereaderwiki.com › en › Treaty_of_Paris_(1814)
    • Parties to The Treaty
    • New Borders of France
    • Plan For Congress of Vienna
    • Territories of Other Nations
    • House of Bourbon
    • Slave Trade and Slavery
    • Aftermath
    • See Also
    • Bibliography
    • External Links

    This treaty signed on 30 May 1814, following an armistice signed on 23 April 1814 between Charles, Count of Artois, and the allies. Napoleon had abdicated as Emperor on 13 April, as a result of negotiations at Fontainebleau. Peace talks had started on 9 May between Talleyrand, who negotiated with the allies of Chaumont on behalf of the exiled Bourbon king Louis XVIII of France, and the allies. The Treaty of Paris established peace between France and Great Britain, Russia, Austria, and Prussia, who in March had defined their common war aim in Chaumont. The Treaty was also signed by Portugal and Sweden while Spain signed shortly after in July.The allied parties did not sign a common document, but instead concluded separate treaties with France allowing for specific amendments.

    The allies had agreed to reduce France to her 1792 borders and restore the independence of her neighbors after Napoleon Bonaparte's defeat.

    In addition to the cessation of hostilities, the treaty provided a rough draft of a final settlement, which according to article 32 was to be concluded within the next two months at a congress involving all belligerents of the Napoleonic Wars. This provision resulted in the Congress of Vienna, held between September 1814 and June 1815. The preliminary conditions already agreed in Paris were moderate for France so as not to disturb the re-enthronement of the returned Bourbon king: France's borders of 1 June 1792 were confirmed, and in addition, she was allowed to retain Saarbrücken, Saarlouis, Landau, the County of Montbéliard, part of Savoy with Annecy and Chambéry, also Avignon and the Comtat Venaissinas well as artifacts acquired during the war, while on the other hand she had to cede several colonies. To distinguish this agreement from a second treaty of Paris, concluded on 20 November 1815 as one of the treaties amending Vienna, the treaty of 30 May 1814 is sometimes referred to...

    The treaty reapportioned several territories amongst various countries. Most notably, France retained all territory that it possessed on 1 January 1792 and so reacquired many of the territories lost to Britain during the war. They included Guadeloupe (Art. IX), which had been ceded to Sweden by Britain when it entered the coalition. In return, Sweden was compensated 24 million francs, which gave rise to the Guadeloupe Fund. The only exceptions were Tobago, St. Lucia, Seychelles and Mauritius, all of which were handed over to British control. Britain kept sovereignty over the island of Malta (Art. VII). The treaty returned to Spain the territory of Santo Domingo, which had been transferred to France by the 1795 Peace of Basel in 1795 (Art. VIII). That implicitly recognised French sovereignty over Saint-Domingue, which Dessalines had proclaimed independent under the name of Haiti. France did not recognize the independence of Haiti until 1824. This treaty formally recognized the indepe...

    The treaty recognised the Bourbon monarchy in France, in the person of Louis XVIII, because the treaty was between Louis XVIII the king of France and the heads of states of the Coalition great powers (Preamble to the treaty).

    The treaty aimed to abolish the French slave trade in France but not slavery over a five-year period (Additional Art. I). The territories of France were not included in this aim.

    Several powers, despite the peaceful intentions of the treaty, still feared a reassertion of French power.[citation needed] The Netherlands, now freed from the French empire, asked William I of the House of Orange to be their prince; he accepted in late 1813. This was a first step to what occurred in 1815 during the Congress of Vienna and simultaneously, Napoleon's Hundred Days. In March 1815, the United Kingdom of the Netherlands was formed, which added the former territory of the low countries that had been ruled by the Austrian Empire to the Netherlands, and had William I as its king. His son William joined the fighting at Waterloo, whose battle site was located in the United Kingdom of the Netherlands. Though the Dutch initiated their request to William I, the great powers of the Napoleonic wars had made a secret pact to support a strong nation on that border with France with William as its king, in the Eight Articles of London, signed on 21 June 1814. Thus the action by the Dut...

    EB staff (2014). "Treaties of Paris (1814-1815)". Britannica Online Encyclopedia. Retrieved February 15, 2018.
    Büsch, Otto (1992). Handbuch der preußischen Geschichte (in German). 3. Walter de Gruyter. pp. 72–74, 81. ISBN 3-11-008322-1.
    Malettke, Klaus (2009). Die Bourbonen 3. Von Ludwig XVIII. bis zu den Grafen von Paris (1814-1848) (in German). 3. Kohlhammer Verlag. p. 66. ISBN 3-17-020584-6.
    Rudolf, Uwe Jens; Berg, W. G. (2010). Historical Dictionary of Malta. USA: Scarecrow Press. p. 11. ISBN 9780810853171.
    Media related to Treaty of Paris, 1814at Wikimedia Commons
    Works related to Treaty of Paris (1814)at Wikisource
  9. Treaty of Paris (1810) - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Treaty_of_Paris_(1810)

    For other treaties of Paris, see Treaty of Paris (disambiguation). The Treaty of Paris, signed on 6 January 1810, ended the war between France and Sweden after Sweden's defeat by Russia, an ally of France, in the Finnish War of 1808–1809. Treaty of Paris. Type. Bilateral treaty.

  10. Treaty of Paris (1783) - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Treaty_of_Paris_(1783)

    The Treaty of Paris, signed in Paris by representatives of King George III of Great Britain and representatives of the United States of America on September 3, 1783, officially ended the American Revolutionary War.

    • November 30, 1782
    • September 3, 1783
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