Yahoo Web Search

  1. Voiceless alveolar affricate - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Voiceless_alveolar_affricate

    A voiceless alveolar affricate is a type of affricate consonant pronounced with the tip or blade of the tongue against the alveolar ridge (gum line) just behind the teeth. This refers to a class of sounds, not a single sound.

    • ʦ
    • U+02A6
    • 103 132
    • ts
  2. Voiceless postalveolar affricate - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Voiceless_palato-alveolar...

    The voiceless palato-alveolar sibilant affricate or voiceless domed postalveolar sibilant affricate is a type of consonantal sound used in some spoken languages.The sound is transcribed in the International Phonetic Alphabet with t͡ʃ , t͜ʃ or tʃ (formerly the ligature ʧ ).

    • t​͡​ʃ
    • U+0074 U+0361 U+0283
    • 103 134
    • tS or t_rS
  3. People also ask

    What are affricate sounds?

    What is k sound?

  4. Voiceless alveolar affricate - WikiVisually

    wikivisually.com/wiki/Voiceless_alveolar_affricate

    The voiceless alveolar sibilant affricate [t͡s] is the most common type and has an abrupt hissing sound, as the ts in English cats. The voiceless alveolar retracted sibilant affricate [t͡s̺], also called apico-alveolar or grave, has a weak hushing sound reminiscent of retroflex affricates.

    • 103 132
    • U+02A6
  5. Voiceless alveolar affricate — Wikipedia Republished // WIKI 2

    wiki2.org/en/Voiceless_alveolar_affricate

    The voiceless alveolar sibilant affricate [t͡s] is the most common type and has an abrupt hissing sound, as the ts in English cats. The voiceless alveolar retracted sibilant affricate [t͡s̺], also called apico-alveolar or grave, has a weak hushing sound reminiscent of retroflex affricates.

  6. Alveolar consonant - Simple English Wikipedia, the free ...

    simple.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alveolar_consonant

    An alveolar consonant is a consonant with the tongue close to the alveolar ridge, which is the part just behind our teeth.Alveolar consonants that are pronounced with the tip of the tongue, like in English, are called apical consonants while those pronounced using the blade of the tongue which is the flat part of the tongue behind the tip, are called laminal consonants.

  7. Voiceless alveolar affricate - WikiMili, The Best Wikipedia ...

    wikimili.com/en/Voiceless_alveolar_affricate

    A voiceless alveolar affricate is a type of affricate consonant pronounced with the tip or blade of the tongue against the alveolar ridge (gum line) just behind the teeth. This refers to a class of sounds, not a single sound. There are several types with significant perceptual differences:

  8. Voiceless postalveolar affricate — Wikipedia Republished ...

    wiki2.org/en/Voiceless_postalveolar_affricate

    The voiceless palato-alveolar sibilant affricate or voiceless domed postalveolar sibilant affricate is a type of consonantal sound used in some spoken languages. The sound is transcribed in the International Phonetic Alphabet with t͡ʃ , t͜ʃ or tʃ (formerly the ligature ʧ ). It is familiar to English speakers as the "ch" sound in "chip".

  9. File:Voiceless alveolar sibilant affricate.oga - Wikimedia ...

    commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Voiceless...

    Pronunciation of a voiceless alveolar affricate, [ʦ] between two [a]s. [aʦa] Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License , Version 1.2 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation ; with no Invariant Sections, no Front-Cover Texts, and no Back ...

  10. Modulo:Simbolo ti IPA/datos - Wikipedia, ti nawaya nga ...

    ilo.wikipedia.org/wiki/Modulo:Simbolo_ti_IPA/datos

    Modulo:Simbolo ti IPA/datos. Darsen a mapan iti pagdaliasatan Darsen a mapan agbiruk. Dokumentasion ti ... {name = "Voiceless apico-alveolar affricate", symbols = ...

  11. Voiceless alveolar fricative - WikiVisually

    wikivisually.com/wiki/Voiceless_alveolar_fricative

    A voiceless alveolar fricative is a type of fricative consonant pronounced with the tip or blade of the tongue against the alveolar ridge (gum line) just behind the teeth. This refers to a class of sounds, not a single sound.