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      • Facts about Riots will tell you about a form of civil disorder. The activities identified in riots include the destruction of private, public, and property. Vandalism also occurs in riots. The violent public disturbance is launched against the people, property or authority.
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  2. 10 Facts about Riots | Facts of World

    www.factsofworld.com › 10-facts-about-riots

    Jun 05, 2017 · Facts about Riots will tell you about a form of civil disorder. The activities identified in riots include the destruction of private, public, and property. Vandalism also occurs in riots. The violent public disturbance is launched against the people, property or authority.

  3. 25 Kickass and Interesting Facts About Riots | KickassFacts.com

    www.kickassfacts.com › 25-kickass-and-interesting

    Jul 14, 2015 · 1-5 Interesting Facts About Riots 1. During the London riots of 2011, looting and vandalism which took place throughout the city was almost totally avoided by bookshops. One man said his store would probably stay open during the unrest, stating: “If they steal some books, they might actually learn something.”

  4. Los Angeles Riots Fast Facts - CNN

    www.cnn.com › 2013/09/18 › us

    Sep 18, 2013 · Facts The riots over five days in the spring of 1992 left more than 50 people dead, and more than 2,000 injured. The rioting destroyed or damaged over 1,000 buildings in the Los Angeles area. The...

  5. 7 Surprising Facts About the Stonewall Riots and the Fight ...

    www.history.com › news › stonewall-riots-facts-gay
    • 4 min
    • The first documented U.S. gay rights organization was founded in Chicago in 1924. Henry Gerber, a German immigrant, founded the Society for Human Rights, the first documented gay rights organization in the United States.
    • The pink triangle was co-opted from the Nazis and reclaimed as a badge of pride. Before the pink triangle became a worldwide symbol of gay power, it was intended as a badge of shame.
    • Three years before Stonewall, a protest for gay rights started in another New York City bar. In 1966, three members of the Mattachine Society, an early organization dedicated to fighting for gay rights, staged a “sip-in”—a twist on the “sit-in” protests of the 1960s.
    • The Mafia ran gay bars in NYC in the 1960s. It was an unlikely partnership. But between New York’s LGBTQ community in the 1960s being forced to live on the outskirts of society and the Mafia’s disregard for the law, the two became a profitable, if uneasy, match.
  6. It's Interesting How the Violent Riots of 2020 Ended Right ...

    www.theorganicprepper.com › 2020-riots
    • May. Minneapolis immediately erupted into violent riots that turned deadly. Rioters set the police station on fire. Within a week of Mr. Floyd’s death, demonstrations had spread to 30 cities across the United States, many turning from peaceful protests to riots.
    • June. The National Guard was deployed to cities across the country in an attempt to quell the violence. Seattle: Atlanta: Los Angeles and Hollywood: In this article, a National Guardsman shared a personal account of what was really going on during the Seattle riots.
    • July. In July, police and rioters in cities across the country were engaged in violent clashes. Federal police squared off with rioters in Portland.
    • August. On August 23, fuel was added to the raging inferno when Jacob Blake was shot by police in Kenosha, Wisconsin. At this point, the facts of the shootings were no longer relevant – any police violence against a black suspect was going to result in riots.
  7. The Five Strangest Riots That Actually Happened

    allthatsinteresting.com › strangest-riots

    Mar 29, 2016 · The first recorded riot occurred in 44 BC, after the assassination of Julius Caesar, but you can be certain that they were already a well-established part of human life by that point. While violence is never a laughing matter, the motives behind some riots are just plain bizarre. Ever heard the expression, “People have rioted over less?”

  8. 10 Facts About The Stonewall Riots | KickassFacts.com

    www.kickassfacts.com › stonewall-riots-facts
    • The Stonewall Riot Began In 1969. Police started raiding the Stonewall Inn on June 28th of 1969. The Stonewall Inn was a club located in Greenwich Village, New York City, that supported the LGBTQ (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer) community.
    • The Raid Sparked The First Riot. Police roughly hauled employees and patrons out of the bar, leading to six days of protests and violent clashes with law enforcement outside the bar.
    • Clubs And Bars Were Places Of Refuge. For LGBTQ individuals bars and clubs were a place of refuge, where they could express themselves openly and socialize without worry.
    • The People Weren’t Pleased With The Police’s Behavior (To Say The Least). Officers allegedly targeted Stonewall for its lack of a liquor license and owners’ possible blackmail attempts on gay attendees.
  9. Stonewall Riots Facts | Mental Floss

    www.mentalfloss.com › 583074 › stonewall-riots-facts
    • The Stonewall Inn was operated by an organized crime organization. In the 1960s, homosexuality was under fire from all directions. Because it was perceived as being amoral, individuals caught engaging in so-called "lewd behavior" were arrested and their names and home addresses were published in their local newspapers.
    • Police had to lock themselves inside the Stonewall Inn to barricade themselves from the crowd. During the June 28 raid, police (who were alleged to have targeted Stonewall for its lack of a liquor license and the owners' possible blackmail attempts on gay attendees) confiscated alcohol and arrested 13 people in total, some for violating the statute on inappropriate gender apparel.
    • The situation got worse on the second night of the Stonewall riots. After getting the crowd to disperse, police likely thought the worst of their problems was over.
    • Protestors set their sights on The Village Voice. Tempers flared again days later when The Village Voice published two articles using homophobic slurs to describe the scene at the Stonewall Inn.
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