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    • Risk factors that increase the likelihood of developing scarlet fever include:

      • Age - being between the ages of two and 10 years;
      • An untreated streptococcal sore throat infection or school sores;
      • Exposure to a family or household member who has a streptococcal infection;
      • Crowded conditions, such as a day care center or school, and;
      • Being prone to having Streptococcus bacteria living in your throat.
      healthand.com/us/topic/general-report/scarlet-fever#:~:text=Risk%20factors%20that%20increase%20the%20likelihood%20of%20developing,to%20having%20Streptococcus%20bacteria%20living%20in%20your%20throat.
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    What is the cause of scarlet fever?

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  2. Scarlet fever - Symptoms and causes - Mayo Clinic

    www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/scarlet...
    • Overview
    • Symptoms
    • Causes
    • Risk Factors
    • Complications
    • Prevention

    Scarlet fever is a bacterial illness that develops in some people who have strep throat. Also known as scarlatina, scarlet fever features a bright red rash that covers most of the body. Scarlet fever is almost always accompanied by a sore throat and a high fever.Scarlet fever is most common in children 5 to 15 years of age. Although scarlet fever was once considered a serious childhood illness, antibiotic treatments have made it less threatening. Still, if left untreated, scarlet fever can re...

    The signs and symptoms that give scarlet fever its name include: 1. Red rash. The rash looks like a sunburn and feels like sandpaper. It typically begins on the face or neck and spreads to the trunk, arms and legs. If pressure is applied to the reddened skin, it will turn pale. 2. Red lines. The folds of skin around the groin, armpits, elbows, knees and neck usually become a deeper red than the surrounding rash. 3. Flushed face. The face may appear flushed with a pale ring around the mouth. 4...

    Scarlet fever is caused by the same type of bacteria that cause strep throat. In scarlet fever, the bacteria release a toxin that produces the rash and red tongue.The infection spreads from person to person via droplets expelled when an infected person coughs or sneezes. The incubation period — the time between exposure and illness — is usually two to four days.

    Children 5 to 15 years of age are more likely than are other people to get scarlet fever. Scarlet fever germs spread more easily among people in close contact, such as family members or classmates.

    If scarlet fever goes untreated, the bacteria may spread to the: 1. Tonsils 2. Lungs 3. Skin 4. Kidneys 5. Blood 6. Middle earRarely, scarlet fever can lead to rheumatic fever, a serious condition that can affect the: 1. Heart 2. Joints 3. Nervous system 4. Skin

    There is no vaccine to prevent scarlet fever. The best prevention strategies for scarlet fever are the same as the standard precautions against infections: 1. Wash your hands. Show your child how to wash his or her hands thoroughly with warm soapy water. 2. Don't share dining utensils or food. As a rule, your child shouldn't share drinking glasses or eating utensils with friends or classmates. This rule applies to sharing food, too. 3. Cover your mouth and nose. Tell your child to cover his o...

  3. Causes and Risk Factors of Scarlet Fever - Verywell Health

    www.verywellhealth.com/scarlet-fever-causes-and...
    • Common Causes
    • Risk Factors
    • Prevention

    Although there are any number of reasons a person may develop a rash, only Group A streptococcus causes scarlet fever.1 Group A Streptococcus is a bacteria that commonly causes strep throat in school-age children and adults. It can also cause impetigo, which is a bacterial infection on the skin. Very rarely, some people with Group A strep infections may develop post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis—a kidney disease that occurs after strep throat, scarlet fever, or impetigo.2 The rash appears on the torso—more specifically, the chest and abdomen—and consists of fine, red bumps that appear similar to sandpaper. In fact, it is often referred to as a "sandpaper rash."

    There are no known genetic risk factors that make a person more likely than others to get scarlet fever, but age and exposure to others with the illness are the known risk factors for getting it.1 Contact and Exposure Scarlet fever (and strep throat) are most common in children between the ages of 5 and 15. Teachers and caregivers of children in this age range are also more likely to get it—if you are frequently exposed to school-age children, your chances of getting scarlet fever are higher than they would be otherwise.3 Scarlet fever and strep throat are spread through contact with infected people. They are passed through respiratory droplets, shared when someone infected with the bacteria coughs or sneezes and another person breathes those droplets in. It is also passed through shared drinks and utensils that may have saliva from an infected person on them. The CDC reports that it is possible, but rare, for Group A strep to be passed through food if it is handled improperly.3...

    Taking care to wash your hands, or use hand sanitizer if soap and water are not available, can reduce the chances that you will get scarlet fever if you are around someone that has it. Try to avoid contact with people that are known to have scarlet fever until they have been on antibiotics for 24 hours. Encourage children to wash their hands frequently and not share drinks or other items that they may put in their mouths.

  4. A Group A Streptococcal Infection | CDC

    www.cdc.gov/.../diseases-public/scarlet-fever.html

    Bacteria called group A Streptococcus or group A strep cause scarlet fever. The bacteria sometimes make a poison (toxin), which causes a rash — the “scarlet” of scarlet fever. How You Get Scarlet Fever Group A strep live in the nose and throat and can easily spread to other people.

  5. Scarlet Fever: Symptoms, Causes, Complications, and Treatment

    www.healthline.com/health/scarlet-fever

    Mar 21, 2019 · Cause of scarlet fever Scarlet fever is caused by group A Streptococcus, or Streptococcus pyogenes bacteria, which are bacteria that can live in your mouth and nasal passages. Humans are the main...

  6. Scarlet Fever - Symptoms, Causes, Treatments

    www.healthgrades.com/.../scarlet-fever

    Jan 02, 2019 · Risk factors for scarlet fever include: Contact with an infected person Failing to wash your hands after contact with an infected person or droplets of mucus or saliva from an infected person Living in a community that has experienced an outbreak

  7. Scarlet Fever- Causes, Symptoms and Treatment

    diseasesdic.com/scarlet-fever-causes-symptoms...

    Risk factors that increase the likelihood of developing scarlet fever include: Age – being between the ages of two and 10 years; An untreated infection; Exposure to a family or household member who has a streptococcal infection; Crowded conditions, such as a daycare center or school, and; Being prone to having Streptococcus bacteria living in your throat; Causes of Scarlet Fever

  8. Scarlet fever: Causes, symptoms, treatment, and complications

    www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/176242

    Oct 12, 2017 · Scarlet fever is caused by a toxin released by the bacteria Streptococcus pyogenes (S. pyrogenes), the same organism that causes strep throat. A small percentage of patients with strep infections,...

  9. Group A Strep | Scarlet Fever | For Clinicians | GAS | CDC

    www.cdc.gov/.../diseases-hcp/scarlet-fever.html
    • Etiology
    • Clinical Features
    • Transmission
    • Risk Factors
    • Diagnosis and Testing
    • Treatment
    • Prognosis and Complications
    • Prevention
    • Epidemiology and Surveillance
    • Resources

    Scarlet fever is an illness caused by pyrogenic exotoxin-producing S. pyogenes. S. pyogenes are gram-positive cocci that grow in chains (see figure 1). They exhibit β-hemolysis (complete hemolysis) when grown on blood agar plates. They belong to group A in the Lancefield classification system for β-hemolytic Streptococcus, and thus are called group A streptococci.

    Scarlet fever, also called scarlatina, is characterized by a scarlatiniform rash and usually occurs with group A strep pharyngitis. It can also follow group A strep pyoderma or wound infections.Characteristics of the rash typically include: 1. Erythematous rash that blanches on pressure 2. Sandpaper quality 3. Accentuation of the red rash in flexor creases (i.e., under the arm, in the groin), termed “Pastia’s lines” 4. Begins on the trunk, then quickly spreads outward, usually sparing the pal...

    Group A strep infections, including scarlet fever, are most commonly spread through direct person-to-person transmission. Typically transmission occurs through saliva or nasal secretions from an infected person. People with scarlet fever are much more likely to transmit the bacteria to others than asymptomatic carriers. Crowded conditions — such as those in schools, daycare centers, or military training facilities — facilitate transmission. Although rare, spread of group A strep infections ma...

    Scarlet fever can occur in people of all ages. It is most common among children 5 through 15 years of age. It is rare in children younger than 3 years of age.The most common risk factor is close contact with another person with scarlet fever. Crowding, such as found in schools, military barracks, and daycare centers, increases the risk of disease spread.

    The differential diagnosis of scarlet fever with pharyngitis includes multiple viral pathogens that can cause acute pharyngitis with a viral exanthema. Clinicians need to use either a rapid antigen detection test (RADT) or throat culture to confirm scarlet fever with pharyngitis. RADTs have high specificity for group A strep but varying sensitivities when compared to throat culture. Throat culture is the gold standard diagnostic test. Clinicians should follow up a negative RADT in a child wit...

    The use of a recommended antibiotic regimen to treat scarlet fever: 1. Shortens the duration of symptoms 2. Reduces the likelihood of transmission to family members, classmates, and other close contacts 3. Prevents the development of complications, including acute rheumatic feverPenicillin or amoxicillin is the antibiotic of choice to treat scarlet fever. There has never been a report of a clinical isolate of group A strep that is resistant to penicillin. For patients with a penicillin allerg...

    Rarely, complications can occur after scarlet fever. Scarlet fever can have the same suppurative and non-suppurative complications as group A strep pharyngitis. Suppurative complications result from local or hematogenous spread of the organism. They can include: 1. Peritonsillar abscesses 2. Retropharyngeal abscess 3. Cervical lymphadenitis 4. Invasive group A strep diseaseAcute rheumatic fever is a nonsuppurative sequelae of group A strep pharyngitis. Post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis is...

    Good hand hygiene and respiratory etiquette can reduce the spread of all types of group A strep infection. Hand hygiene is especially important after coughing and sneezing and before preparing foods or eating. Good respiratory etiquette involves covering your cough or sneeze. Treating an infected person with an antibiotic for 24 hours or longer generally eliminates their ability to transmit the bacteria. Thus, people with scarlet fever should stay home from work, school, or daycare until: 1....

    Humans are the only reservoir for group A strep. It is most common among children 5 through 15 years of age. It is rare in children younger than 3 years of age. In the United States, scarlet fever is most common during the winter.CDC does not track the incidence of scarlet fever or other non-invasive group A strep infections. CDC tracks invasive group A strep infections through the Active Bacterial Core surveillance (ABCs) program. For information on the incidence of invasive group A strep in...

    1. Shulman ST, Bisno AL, Clegg HW, Gerber MA, Kaplan EL, Lee G, et al. Clinical practice guideline for the diagnosis and management of group A streptococcal pharyngitis: 2012 update by the Infectious Diseases Society of AmericaExternal. Clin Infect Dis. 2012;55(10):1279–82. 2. Committee on Infectious Diseases. Group A streptococcal infectionsExternal. In Kimberlin DW, Brady MT, Jackson MA, Long SS, editors. 30th ed. Red Book: 2015 Report of the Committee on Infectious Diseases. Elk Grove Vil...

  10. What causes scarlet fever Scarlet fever is caused by the same type of bacteria that cause strep throat. In scarlet fever, the bacteria release a toxin that produces the rash and red tongue. The infection spreads from person to person via droplets expelled when an infected person coughs or sneezes.

  11. Rheumatic fever - Symptoms and causes - Mayo Clinic

    www.mayoclinic.org/.../symptoms-causes/syc-20354588
    • Overview
    • Symptoms
    • Causes
    • Risk Factors
    • Complications
    • Prevention

    Rheumatic fever is an inflammatory disease that can develop as a complication of inadequately treated strep throat or scarlet fever. Strep throat and scarlet fever are caused by an infection with streptococcus bacteria.Rheumatic fever is most common in 5- to 15-year-old children, though it can develop in younger children and adults. Although strep throat is common, rheumatic fever is rare in the United States and other developed countries. However, rheumatic fever remains common in many devel...

    Rheumatic fever symptoms vary. You can have few symptoms or several, and symptoms can change during the course of the disease. The onset of rheumatic fever usually occurs about two to four weeks after a strep throat infection. Rheumatic fever signs and symptoms — which result from inflammation in the heart, joints, skin or central nervous system — can include: 1. Fever 2. Painful and tender joints — most often in the knees, ankles, elbows and wrists 3. Pain in one joint that migrates to anoth...

    Rheumatic fever can occur after an infection of the throat with a bacterium called group A streptococcus. Group A streptococcus infections of the throat cause strep throat or, less commonly, scarlet fever. Group A streptococcus infections of the skin or other parts of the body rarely trigger rheumatic fever.The link between strep infection and rheumatic fever isn't clear, but it appears that the bacterium tricks the immune system. The strep bacterium contains a protein similar to one found in...

    Factors that can increase the risk of rheumatic fever include: 1. Family history. Some people carry a gene or genes that might make them more likely to develop rheumatic fever. 2. Type of strep bacteria. Certain strains of strep bacteria are more likely to contribute to rheumatic fever than are other strains. 3. Environmental factors. A greater risk of rheumatic fever is associated with overcrowding, poor sanitation and other conditions that can easily result in the rapid transmission or mult...

    Inflammation caused by rheumatic fever can last a few weeks to several months. In some cases, the inflammation causes long-term complications.Rheumatic heart disease is permanent damage to the heart caused by rheumatic fever. It usually occurs 10 to 20 years after the original illness. Problems are most common with the valve between the two left chambers of the heart (mitral valve), but the other valves can be affected. The damage can result in: 1. Valve stenosis. This narrowing of the valve...

    The only way to prevent rheumatic fever is to treat strep throat infections or scarlet fever promptly with a full course of appropriate antibiotics.