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  1. Aquinas Students | Aquinas College

    www.aquinas.edu › discover-aq › aquinas-students

    Aquinas students receive a four year liberal arts education with over 100 majors and minors, which prepares them for employment, lifelong learning, and critical thinking. Students make real the vision of the college: Aquinas College is an exceptional Catholic liberal arts college that prepares individuals for careers of leadership and service ...

  2. Aquinas students receive a four year liberal arts education with over 100 majors and minors, which prepares them for employment, lifelong learning, and critical thinking. Students make real the vision of the college: Aquinas College is an exceptional Catholic liberal arts college that prepares individuals for careers of leadership and service ...

  3. Life at AQ | Aquinas College

    www.aquinas.edu › life-aq

    Aquinas students receive a four year liberal arts education with over 100 majors and minors, which prepares them for employment, lifelong learning, and critical thinking. Students make real the vision of the college: Aquinas College is an exceptional Catholic liberal arts college that prepares individuals for careers of leadership and service ...

  4. A Private Liberal Arts Education | Aquinas College

    aquinas.edu › discover-aq › private-liberal-arts-education

    Students make real the vision of the college: Aquinas College is an exceptional Catholic liberal arts college that prepares individuals for careers of leadership and service in developing a sustainable and just global community.

  5. College Policies | Aquinas College

    aquinas.edu › discover-aq › college-policies

    Aquinas students receive a four year liberal arts education with over 100 majors and minors, which prepares them for employment, lifelong learning, and critical thinking. Students make real the vision of the college: Aquinas College is an exceptional Catholic liberal arts college that prepares individuals for careers of leadership and service ...

  6. Aquinas College (Fees & Reviews): Michigan, United States

    www.edarabia.com › 31089 › aquinas-college

    Students make real the vision of the college: Aquinas College is an exceptional Catholic liberal arts college that prepares individuals for careers of leadership and service in developing a sustainable and just global community. Aquinas College will give you the time and space to ponder new ideas, to dream boldly and without limit.

    • (2)
    • (616) 632-8900
    • 1700 Fulton St E, Grand Rapids
  7. Archives - LibGuides at Aquinas College

    aquinas.libguides.com › library › archives

    Jul 06, 2021 · Aquinas students receive a four year liberal arts education with over 100 majors and minors, which prepares them for employment, lifelong learning, and critical thinking. Students make real the vision of the college: Aquinas College is an exceptional Catholic liberal arts college that prepares individuals for careers of leadership and service ...

  8. Students – The Advantage | Aquinas College

    aqadvantage.aquinas.edu › channels › student

    The AQ Advantage Center services as a guidepost for students, housing Career Services and Internships, Study Away, and Student Research. The best way to schedule a meeting is to make an appointment online. Visit aquinas.joinhandshake.com and if you are a first time user, use your Aquinas email. Click on Career Center – Appointments ...

  9. Computer Recommendations | Aquinas College

    www.aquinas.edu › its › computer-recommendations

    Aquinas students receive a four year liberal arts education with over 100 majors and minors, which prepares them for employment, lifelong learning, and critical thinking. Students make real the vision of the college: Aquinas College is an exceptional Catholic liberal arts college that prepares individuals for careers of leadership and service ...

  10. Academic Integrity and Plagiarism - LibGuides at Aquinas College

    aquinas.libguides.com › library › plagiarism
    • What Exactly Is Plagiarism?
    • Plagiarism Short-Circuits Learning.
    • Plagiarism Destroys The Relationship of Trust Between Faculty and Students.
    • Plagiarism Is Unfair to classmates.
    • Plagiarism Destroys Independent Creative and Critical Thinking.
    • Plagiarism Carries Serious consequences.
    • What Are The Penalties?
    • Why Is Plagiarism Such A Big Deal?
    • How Do You Know If You're plagiarizing?
    • How Does A Professor Find Plagiarism? Do Professors Check The Sources?

    Plagiarism is a form of cheating and a form of lying. Usually it's a way of trying to complete an assignment without doing all of the necessary work. A writer plagiarizes when he or she turns in a paper that contains passages or important ideas written by someone else and doesn't give credit to the original author. At Aquinas, we see a difference between two kinds of plagiarism. The rules and regulations for quoting and citing material in college-level work are fairly complicated, and students new to this work can sometimes make mistakes that technically result in plagiarism. We call this unintentional plagiarism, and although it's serious, almost always professors will give you a chance to remedy the problem and learn from your mistakes. But there's a more serious kind of plagiarism that involves a deliberate lie and an effort to cheat. Intentional plagiarism is a flagrant attempt to take the easy way out of an assignment by presenting a whole paper or parts of one that were writte...

    Professors assign papers to provide opportunities to deepen and enrich your learning in a course. When you write a paper, you go beyond what's been said in the textbook or in the classroom, and make the learning your own. When a student plagiarizes a paper, the student misses the chance to learn.

    Students need to be able to trust their professors. They need confidence that professors are up-to-date in the information they present, accurate in their portrayal of texts and theories, reliably fair in their evaluations of students' work. Likewise, professors need to trust their students. They have to have confidence in the truthfulness of students' statements in class, the honesty of their efforts to learn, and their trustworthiness in the papers and projects they submit for grading. Academic work at the college level depends on the give and take of ideas in the classroom, on the discussion and debates we carry on with one another, and on the honest presentation of ideas in written papers, articles, and books. In order for us to do our daily work in college, we need to have confidence in the truthfulness of our colleagues in this work - both professors and students.

    A paper assignment requires all the members of a class to do a significant amount of work. When one person plagiarizes, classmates who do honest work are likely to feel betrayed and angry.

    A primary purpose of higher education is to guide students in becoming independent, original thinkers. Creative and critical thought are subverted when a student plagiarizes, and a basic reason for being in college is undermined.

    Plagiarism carries severe disciplinary and financial consequences. When a student is proven to have plagiarized a paper, he or she faces serious penalties, ranging from failure on the assignment to failure in the course. These penalties will be reported to the college's Dean of Students, who will enter the offense in the student's record. Repeated acts of plagiarism will lead to dismissal from the college. Plagiarism in the professional world can also lead to serious consequences, including professional disgrace, loss of position, and lawsuits.

    Aquinas gives professors some choices about how to deal with students who plagiarize. If a professor believes that a student commits plagiarism because he or she is trying to do honest work but doesn't know all of the rules and regulations about how to cite sources, the professor will usually impose some kind of penalty and require the student to redo the work. The penalty might be a lower grade or even failure for the assignment, but usually the student will still be able to pass the course if the other work in the semester is good enough. When a professor believes a student has intended to lie about the source of ideas and words, and has tried to cheat on an assignment, the penalties are much stiffer. The professor can fail the student for the assignment and can also fail the student for the course. In fact, the usual penalty for this kind of plagiarism is failure for the course.

    You'd think that authors would want us to use their ideas. It's not as if we're taking credit for them-we're just harmless college students. When you turn in someone else's work as your own, you are indeed taking credit for ideas that aren't yours, even if you aren't publishing those ideas. When you plagiarize, you also undermine your own learning experience. And you compromise your personal integrity. Plagiarism is a big deal not only because of the ethical implications, but also because it is on the rise in the United States. With so many students plagiarizing, it becomes increasingly important to think about why we come to college.

    You are plagiarizing if you: 1. cut-and-paste without acknowledging your source 2. borrow an idea without acknowledging your source 3. turn in a paper purchased online or written by a friend 4. turn in a paper that you have already received credit for in another class

    Aquinas professors read student work very carefully. Consequently, professors notice telltale shifts and irregularities-an abrupt change in vocabulary, style, or syntax; a reference to ideas that seem contextually surprising; a paper that seems slightly off-topic. Aquinas professors check sources in a variety of ways. Some professors ask students to turn in copies of sources. Some collaborate with research librarians. Many professors keep abreast of the "study guides" marketed to students. Finally, professors make judicious use of search engines and other electronic tools.