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    • What is new wave music?

      • New wave music. New wave is a genre of rock music popular in the late 1970s and the 1980s with ties to mid-1970s punk rock. New wave moved away from blues and rock and roll sounds to create rock music (early new wave) or pop music (later) that incorporated disco, mod, and electronic music.
      en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_wave_music#:~:text=New%20wave%20music.%20New%20wave%20is%20a%20genre,%28later%29%20that%20incorporated%20disco%2C%20mod%2C%20and%20electronic%20music.
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  2. New wave music - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_wave_music

    New wave is a music genre that encompasses numerous pop-oriented styles from the late 1970s and the 1980s. It was originally used as a catch-all for the music that emerged after punk rock, including punk itself, but may be viewed retrospectively as a more accessible counterpart of post-punk.

  3. New Wave Music Genre Overview | AllMusic

    www.allmusic.com/style/new-wave-ma0000002750

    During the late '70s and early '80s, New Wave was a catch-all term for the music that directly followed punk rock; often, the term encompassed punk itself, as well. In retrospect, it became clear that the music following punk could be divided, more or less, into two categories -- post-punk and new wave.

  4. New wave | music | Britannica

    www.britannica.com/art/new-wave-music

    New wave music encompassed a wide variety of styles, which often shared a quirky insouciance and sense of humour. In the United States this broad spectrum included the B-52s, leading lights of an emerging music scene in Athens, Georgia, whose hybrid dance music mixed girl group harmonies with vocal experimentation such as that of Yoko Ono; Blondie, with its sex-symbol vocalist Deborah Harry ...

  5. New Wave - Music Genres - Rate Your Music

    rateyourmusic.com/genre/New+Wave

    New wave bands' quirky, irreverent, and self-conscious approach was a novel contrast to the underground rock movements formed in the wake of punk as well as corporate mainstream pop music in the 1970s, which helped the genre quickly establish itself as a major force in 1980s pop culture in both the West, where it originated, and abroad.

  6. New wave music | Rock Music Wiki | Fandom

    rock.fandom.com/wiki/New_wave_music
    • Overview
    • The term "new wave"[edit]
    • Styles and subgenres[edit]

    New wave music is a genre of rock music for several late-1970s to mid-1980s pop/rock styles with ties to punk rock. Initially ā€“ as with the later pub rock and pop rock ā€“ new wave was broadly analogous to most modern punk rock before branching as a distinctly identified music genre, incorporating electronic music, progressive rock, country rock, disco, art rock and pop music. It subsequently engendered subgenres and fusions, including Indie rock and Alternative rock. New wave differs...

    New wave is much more closely tied to punk and came and went more quickly in the United Kingdom than in the United States. At the time punk began, it was a major phenomenon in the United Kingdom and a minor one in the United States. Thus when new wave acts started getting ...

    "Bit by bit the last traces of Punk were drained from New Wave, as New Wave went from meaning Talking Heads to meaning the Cars to Squeeze to Duran Duran to, finally, Wham! "

    The new wave sound of the late 1970s represented a break from the smooth-oriented blues and rock & roll sounds of late 1960s to mid-1970s rock music. According to music journalist Simon Reynolds, the music had a twitchy, agitated feel to it. New wave musicians often played choppy rhythm guitars with fast tempos. Keyboards were common as were stop-and-start song structures and melodies. Reynolds noted that new wave vocalists sounded high-pitched, geeky and suburban. Theo Cateforis, an assistant p...

    • late 1970s and early-1980s UK and USA
    • Indie rock
    • Synthpunk
    • Alternative rock
  7. New Wave - Music Genres - Rate Your Music

    rateyourmusic.com/genre/new wave

    New wave is a genre that appeared in the late 1970s, influenced by Punk Rock and Electronic music. It's characterized by agitated and busy guitar melodies alongside jerky rhythm guitars, an heavy reliance on synthesizers, "stop-and-go" composition structures, and a typical use of intricated percussive sections, sometimes with the help of drum machines.

  8. New Wave Music | Encyclopedia.com

    www.encyclopedia.com/.../new-wave-music

    Moreover, new wave is the music of 1980s brat pack genre films, like The Breakfast Club (1985), Valley Girl (1983), and Sixteen Candles (1984). Defining which artist or which song fits into a genre is always a difficult proposition, but new wave presents a particular challenge because of the multiple definitions and the music industry's ...

  9. Wave Music: Why You Need This Genre In Your Life Right Now

    www.highsnobiety.com/p/soundcloud-wave-music

    Wave Music: Why You Need This New Genre In Your Life Right Now. 2020-06-03 16:20 in Music Words By Contributor . Highsnobiety. Every once in a while, a genre will rise from the murky musical swamp ...

  10. History of New Wave Music: Then and Now - Lexicon Magazine

    www.lexiconmagazine.com/history-of-new-wave

    New wave music is a well-known category of rock music. It was mainly popular in the 1970s to the early 1980s. The genre was tied to the punk rock music of the 1970s. A remarkable difference of new wave music is that it moved away from the conventional rock and roll rhythms and blues to come up with pop music. The newly developed pop music was ...

  11. List of new wave artists - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_new_wave_artists

    The following is a list of artists and bands associated with the new wave music genre during the late 1970s and early-to-mid 1980s. The list does not include acts associated with the resurgences and revivals of the genre that have occurred from the 1990s onward.