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  1. Guitar - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guitar

    The guitar is a fretted musical instrument that usually has six strings. It is typically played with both hands by strumming or plucking the strings with either a guitar pick or the fingers/fingernails of one hand, while simultaneously fretting (pressing the strings against the frets) with the fingers of the other hand.

    • 321.322, (Composite chordophone)
  2. The guitar may have come from older instruments known as the sitara from ancient India and central Asia. The oldest known picture of a guitar-like instrument is a 3300 year old stone carving of a Hittite bard. The oldest guitar-like instrument that is still complete is the "Warwick Gittern" in the British Museum.

    • String instrument (plucked, nylon stringed guitars usually played with fingerpicking, and steel-, etc. usually with a pick.)
  3. Acoustic guitar - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acoustic_guitar

    An acoustic guitar is a musical instrument in the guitar family. Its strings vibrate a sound board on a resonant body to project a sound wave through the air. The original, general term for this stringed instrument is guitar, and the retronym 'acoustic guitar' distinguishes it from an electric guitar, which relies on electronic amplification.

    • 13th century
    • 321.322, (Composite Chordophone)
  4. Electric guitar - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electric_guitar

    An electric guitar is a guitar that requires external amplification in order to be heard at typical performance volumes. It uses one or more pickups to convert the vibration of its strings into electrical signals, which ultimately are reproduced as sound by loudspeakers.

    • Guitar, solid-body guitar
    • 321.322, (Composite chordophone)
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  6. Tablature - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tablature

    Tablature (or tabulature, or tab for short) is a form of musical notation indicating instrument fingering rather than musical pitches.. Tablature is common for fretted stringed instruments such as the lute, vihuela, or guitar, as well as many free reed aerophones such as the harmonica.

  7. Guitar solo - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guitar_solo

    A guitar solo is a melodic passage, instrumental section, or entire piece of music written for a classical guitar, electric guitar or an acoustic guitar.In 20th and 21st century traditional music and popular music such as blues, swing, jazz, jazz fusion, rock and metal, guitar solos often contain virtuoso techniques and varying degrees of improvisation.

  8. Guitar picking - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guitar_picking

    Guitar picking is a group of hand and finger techniques a guitarist uses to set guitar strings in motion to produce audible notes. These techniques involve plucking, strumming, brushing, etc. Picking can be done with:

  9. Capo - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Capo

    A common example is a capo that covers the top five strings of a guitar and omitting the bass E string. When played at the second fret, this appears to create a drop D tuning (in which the bass E string is detuned to a D) raised one full tone in pitch.

  10. G&L Musical Instruments - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/G&L_Musical_Instruments

    G&L is an American guitar manufacturing company founded by Leo Fender, George Fullerton, and Dale Hyatt in the late 1970s.. G&L produces electric guitars and basses with designs based on some classic Fender instruments.

  11. guitar | History, Types, & Facts | Britannica

    www.britannica.com/art/guitar

    Guitar, plucked stringed musical instrument that probably originated in Spain early in the 16th century. In popular music the guitar is usually amplified, and ensembles frequently include more than one instrument, a ‘lead’ guitar for solos, another for rhythm, and a ‘bass’ guitar to play bass lines.

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