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  1. White British - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/White_British

    White British is an ethnicity classification used in the 2011 United Kingdom Census.In the 2011 census, the White British population was 51,736,290, 86.1% of the UK total population (NB: This total includes the population estimate for Northern Ireland, where only the term 'White' is used in ethnic classification.

    • 42,279,236 (79.8%) (2011)
    • 2,855,450 (93.2%) (2011)
    • 4,863,000 (91.8%) (2011)
  2. British White cattle - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/British_White_cattle

    The British White is a naturally polled British cattle breed, white with black or red points, used mainly for beef. It has a confirmed history dating back to the 17th century. It has a confirmed history dating back to the 17th century.

  3. Mark White (British musician) - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mark_White_(British_musician)

    Mark Andrew White (born 1 April 1961) is an English singer, songwriter, composer, musician and record producer.. Born in Sheffield, England, White first entered the music industry in the late 1970s as lead singer and keyboardist of the electronic band Vice Versa.

  4. White people - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/White_people

    The terms white British, White Irish, White Scottish and White Other are used. These classifications rely on individuals' self-identification, since it is recognised that ethnic identity is not an objective category. Socially, in the UK white usually refers only to people of native British, Irish and European origin.

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  6. George White (British Army officer) - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_White_(British_Army...

    Field Marshal Sir George Stuart White, VC, GCB, OM, GCSI, GCMG, GCIE, GCVO (6 July 1835 – 24 June 1912) was an officer of the British Army.He was stationed at Peshawar during the Indian Mutiny and then fought at the Battle of Charasiab in October 1879 and at the Battle of Kandahar in September 1880 during the Second Anglo-Afghan War.

  7. White Rock, British Columbia - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/White_Rock,_British_Columbia

    White Rock is a city in British Columbia, Canada, and a member municipality of Metro Vancouver. It borders Semiahmoo Bay to the south and is surrounded on three sides by South Surrey . To the southeast across a footbridge lies the Semiahmoo First Nation , which is within the borders of Surrey .

  8. English people - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/English_people

    They found that while 58% of white people in England described their nationality as "English", the vast majority of non-white people called themselves "British". Relationship to Britishness. It is unclear how many British people consider themselves English. The words "English" and "British" may be used interchangeably, especially outside the UK.

  9. T. H. White - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/T._H._White

    Early life. He was born in Bombay, British India, to English parents Garrick Hanbury White, a superintendent in the Indian police, and Constance Edith Southcote Aston. White had a troubled childhood, with an alcoholic father and an emotionally cold mother, and his parents separated when he was 14.

  10. British people - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/British_people

    The indigenous people of the British Isles have a combination of Celtic, Anglo-Saxon, Norse and Norman ancestry.. Between the 8th and 11th centuries, "three major cultural divisions" had emerged in Great Britain: the English, the Scots and the Welsh, the earlier Brittonic Celtic polities in what are today England and Scotland having finally been absorbed into Anglo-Saxon England and Gaelic ...

  11. Dominion - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dominion

    A dominion was one of the semi-independent polities under the British Crown that constituted the British Empire, beginning with Canadian Confederation in 1867. A "dominion status" was a constitutional term of art used to signify a semi-independent Commonwealth realm; they included Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Newfoundland, South Africa, and the Irish Free State.