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  1. Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) has been a nationally notifiable condition since the 1920s. As of January 1, 2010, cases of RMSF are reported under a new category called Spotted Fever Rickettsiosis (SFR). This category captures cases of RMSF, Rickettsia parkeri rickettsiosis, Pacific Coast tick fever, and rickettsialpox.

  2. Rocky Mountain spotted fever - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rocky_Mountain_spotted_fever

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) is a bacterial disease spread by ticks. It typically begins with a fever and headache , which is followed a few days later with the development of a rash . [3] The rash is generally made up of small spots of bleeding and starts on the wrists and ankles. [10]

    • 2 to 14 days after infection
    • Early: Fever, headache, Later: Rash
  3. May 07, 2019 · Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) is a bacterial disease spread through the bite of an infected tick. Most people who get sick with RMSF will have a fever, headache, and rash. RMSF can be deadly if not treated early with the right antibiotic.

  4. MOUNTAIN FEVER IN THE 1847 MORMON PIONEER COMPANIES Jay A. Aldous

    mormonhistoricsites.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/05/NJ9.2...

    MOUNTAIN FEVER IN THE 1847 MORMON PIONEER COMPANIES Jay A. Aldous The cause of mountain fever has been debated for years, but this query has additional interest because of the sesquicentennial year of the arrival of the Mormon pioneers in the Salt Lake Valley. Indeed, one may ask what effect this disease had on the 1847 Mormon pioneer companies.

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  5. Mountain fever Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatments and Causes ...

    www.rightdiagnosis.com/m/mountain_fever/intro.htm

    Mountain fever: A viral disease transmitted through the bite of ticks (Rocky Mountain wood tick and American dog tick) who are infected with the virus. Because the virus infects blood cells including erythrocytes, transmission can also occur through transfusion with infected blood but this is uncommon.

  6. Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever. History of a Twentieth-Century ...

    www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2589483

    Full text Full text is available as a scanned copy of the original print version. Get a printable copy (PDF file) of the complete article (259K), or click on a page image below to browse page by page.

  7. Rocky Mountain spotted fever | Britannica

    www.britannica.com/.../Rocky-Mountain-spotted-fever

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever Child's hand with characteristic rash of Rocky Mountain spotted fever. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) (Image ID: 1962) In western North America , the carrier species is the wood tick , Dermacentor andersoni , which is widely distributed in the adult form on large mammals, particularly cattle and sheep.

  8. Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever in the United States, 2000–2007 ...

    www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2912596

    Jan 01, 2000 · Introduction. Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) is a tick-borne disease caused by the intracellular bacterium Rickettsia rickettsii. 1, 2 Rocky Mountain spotted fever has long been considered one of the most severe tick-borne rickettsial infections, with pre-antibiotic case-fatality rates reported as high as 65–80% in some case series 1 – 4;contemporary estimates from 1981 to 1998 placed ...

    • John J. Openshaw, David L. Swerdlow, John W. Krebs, Robert C. Holman, Eric Mandel, Alexis Harvey, Da...
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    • 2010
  9. History of Rocky Mountain Labs (RML) | NIH: National ...

    www.niaid.nih.gov/about/rocky-mountain-history

    Ricketts identified the causative agent of Rocky Mountain spotted fever. Among the first was Dr. Howard Ricketts, a young pathologist from the University of Chicago, who in 1906, showed that the disease was transmitted by the bite of the Rocky Mountain wood tick ( Dermacentor andersoni ).

  10. Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever | Home

    dshs.texas.gov/.../Rocky-Mountain-Spotted-Fever.aspx

    Infectious Disease Prevention Section Mail Code: 1927 PO BOX 149347 - Austin, TX 78714-9347 1100 West 49th Street, Suite G401 Austin, TX 78714. Phone: (512) 776-7676