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  1. Horse theft - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Horse_theft

    Horse theft is the crime of stealing horses. A person engaged in stealing horses is known as a horse thief. Historically, punishments were often severe for horse theft, with several cultures pronouncing the sentence of death upon actual or presumed thieves.

    • History

      Horse theft was a well-known crime in medieval and early...

    • Present day

      Horse theft is still relatively common, with an estimated...

  2. Horse theft is the crime of stealing a horse. A person accused of stealing a horse is known as a horse thief. Horse theft was fairly common throughout the world prior to widespread car ownership. Punishments were often severe for horse theft. In several places the sentence of death was carried out. This was seen as a deterrent against horse theft.

  3. Grand Theft Horse - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grand_Theft_Horse

    For the video game similar to Grand Theft Auto, see Red Dead Redemption. For horse theft in general, see Horse theft. Grand Theft Horse is a 2018 graphic novel written by Greg Neri and illustrated by Corban Wilkin. The book is published by Lee & Low and is a biography of the horse trainer, Gail Ruffu.

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  5. The Society in Dedham for Apprehending Horse Thieves - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Society_in_Dedham_for...

    The last time the Society investigated a horse theft was in 1909, although though a number of pranks between members set off false alarms after that. In days when vigilante justice was a major component of the Society, "not a few horse thieves were apprehended by the organization of the long name."

  6. Talk:Horse theft - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Talk:Horse_theft

    The original caption on the page here was "The hanging of a horse thief in Oregon, c.1900," at https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Horse_theft&oldid=616348765. The other editor changed the caption to "Dramatization of the hanging of a horse thief in Oregon, c.1900," which is attested nowhere.

  7. Shergar - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shergar

    An investigation by The Sunday Telegraph concluded that the horse was shot four days after the theft. No arrests have ever been made in relation to the theft. Shergar's body has never been recovered or identified; it is likely that the body was buried near Aughnasheelin, near Ballinamore , County Leitrim .

  8. Horses in the Middle Ages - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Horses_in_the_Middle_Ages

    Horse dealers (frequently called "horse coursers" in England) bought and sold horses, and frequently had a reputation as dishonest figures, responsible for the brisk trade in stolen horses. Others, such as the "hackneymen" offered horses for hire, and many formed large establishments on busy roads, often branding their horses to deter theft.

  9. When horse theft is not a “crime” - The Horse Owner's Resource

    equusmagazine.com/horse-care/horse-theft-crime-29323

    Jun 17, 2020 · Civil theft” is, legally speaking, quite different than criminal theft, which is the type of crime that occurs when someone cuts your fence and removes a horse from your property without permission. In the latter, there is a clear delineation between the criminal and the victim.

  10. Protect Your Horse From Theft - Equine Wellness Magazine

    equinewellnessmagazine.com/protect-horse-theft

    Horse theft is big business for thieves, who will steal a horse right out of your pasture; or for con artists, who use laws to their advantage in fraudulent contracts and verbal agreements. In the late 1990s, a study completed in Texas stated that approximately 40,000 horses were stolen each year.

  11. Identity theft - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Identity_theft

    Identity theft is the deliberate use of someone else's identity, usually as a method to gain a financial advantage or obtain credit and other benefits in the other person's name, and perhaps to the other person's disadvantage or loss.