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  1. Japanese language - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japanese_language

    Japanese (日本語, Nihongo [ɲihoŋɡo] (listen)) is an East Asian language spoken by about 128 million people, primarily in Japan, where it is the national language. It is a member of the Japonic (or Japanese- Ryukyuan) language family, and its relation to other languages, such as Korean, is debated.

    • ~128 million (2020)
    • Japan
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  3. Languages of Japan - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Languages_of_Japan

    The most widely spoken language in Japan is Japanese, which is separated into several dialects with Tokyo dialect considered standard Japanese. Languages of Japan OfficialNone MainJapanese RegionalRyukyuan MinorityAinu, Bonin English, Nivkh and Orok ImmigrantKorean, Chinese ForeignEnglish, Russian, German, French, Portuguese, Spanish, Chinese, Dutch SignedJapanese Sign Language Amami Oshima Sign Language Miyakubo Sign Language Keyboard layout JIS In addition to the Japanese language, Ryukyuan la

  4. Japanese language - Simple English Wikipedia, the free ...

    simple.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japanese_language

    Japanese ( 日本語 "Nihon-go" in Japanese) is the official language of Japan, in East Asia. Japanese belongs to the Japonic language family, which also includes the endangered Ryukyuan languages. One theory says Japanese and Korean are related, but most linguists no longer think so.

    • /nihoɴɡo/: [ɲihoŋɡo], [ɲihoŋŋo]
    • Japan
  5. Japanese Wikipedia - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japanese_Wikipedia

    The Japanese Wikipedia is the Japanese-language edition of Wikipedia, a free, open-content encyclopedia. Started on 11 May 2001, the edition attained the 200,000 article mark in April 2006 and the 500,000 article mark in June 2008. As of November 2020, it has over 1,239,000 articles with 14,378 active contributors, ranking fourth behind the English, Spanish and Russian editions. As of June 2020, it is the world's most visited language Wikipedia after the English Wikipedia.

    • May 11, 2001; 19 years ago
    • Japanese
  6. Classification of the Japonic languages - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japanese_language...

    The Hachijō language is sometimes classificated as fourth branch of the Japonic language family but currently seen as a very divergent dialect of Eastern Japanese. [7] [8] It is suggested that the linguistic homeland of Japonic is located somewhere in south-eastern or eastern China before the proto-Japanese migrated to the Korean Peninsula and ...

  7. Japanese Sign Language - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japanese_sign_language

    Japanese Sign Language, also known by the acronym JSL, is the dominant sign language in Japan and is a natural language, like the spoken Japanese language. Japanese Sign Language 日本手話 Nihon Shuwa Native toJapan Native speakers 320,000 Language family Japanese Sign Language family Japanese Sign Language Official status Regulated byJapanese Federation of the Deaf Language codes ISO 639-3jsl Glottologjapa1238

  8. Japanese Wikipedia - Simple English Wikipedia, the free ...

    simple.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japanese_Wikipedia

    The Japanese Wikipedia (Japanese: ウィキペディア日本語版') is the Japanese-language edition of Wikipedia. This edition was started in September 2002. It is the 13th largest edition by article count. As of November 5, 2016, it has over 1,036,000 articles.

  9. Japanese pitch accent - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japanese_pitch_accent

    Japanese pitch accent (高低アクセント, kōtei akusento) is a feature of the Japanese language that distinguishes words by accenting particular morae in most Japanese dialects. The nature and location of the accent for a given word may vary between dialects.

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    www.wikipedia.org

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