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    What are the Malayo-Polynesian languages?

    What is the difference between Malayo-Polynesian and Proto-Oceanic?

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    How many Polynesian languages are there?

  2. The Malayo-Polynesian languages are a subgroup of the Austronesian languages, with approximately 385.5 million speakers. The Malayo-Polynesian languages are spoken by the Austronesian peoples outside of Taiwan , in the island nations of Southeast Asia ( Indonesian and Philippine Archipelago ) and the Pacific Ocean , with a smaller number in continental Asia in the areas near the Malay Peninsula .

  3. There are 38 Polynesian languages, representing 7 percent of the 522 Oceanic languages, and 3 percent of the Austronesian family. While half of them are spoken in geographical Polynesia (the Polynesian triangle ), the other half – known as Polynesian outliers – are spoken in other parts of the Pacific: from Micronesia to atolls scattered in Papua New Guinea , the Solomon Islands or Vanuatu .

  4. The Malayo-Polynesian languages are a subgroup of the Austronesian languages. [1] There are about 385.5 million people who speak these languages. The Malayo-Polynesian languages are spoken by the Austronesian people of the island nations of Southeast Asia and the Pacific Ocean. There are a smaller number in continental Asia.

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    The Central Malayo-Polynesian languages are spoken in the Lesser Sunda and Maluku Islands of the Banda Sea, in an area corresponding closely to the Indonesian provinces of East Nusa Tenggara and Maluku and the nation of East Timor (excepting the Papuan languages of Timor and nearby islands), but with the Bima language extending to the eastern half ...

    In the original proposal, CEMP is divided into Central Malayo-Polynesian (CMP) and Eastern Malayo-Polynesian(EMP). However, CMP is generally understood to be a cover term for the non-EMP languages within CEMP, which form a linkage at best rather than a valid clade. The Central Malayo-Polynesian languages may form a linkage. They are for the most pa...

    Fay Wouk and Malcolm Ross (ed.), The history and typology of western Austronesian voice systems. Australian National University, 2002. hdl:1885/146136 doi:10.15144/PL-518
    K. Alexander Adelaar and Nikolaus Himmelmann, The Austronesian languages of Asia and Madagascar.Routledge, 2005.
  5. The languages are spoken in the Lesser Sunda and Maluku Islands of the Banda Sea, in an area corresponding closely to the Indonesian provinces of East Nusa Tenggara and Maluku and the nation of East Timor (excepting the Papuan languages of Timor and nearby islands), but with the Bima language extending to the eastern half of Sumbawa Island in the province of West Nusa Tenggara and the Sula languages of the Sula archipelago in the southwest corner of the province of North Maluku.

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